Special Issue "Developing the Evidence Base for Rural Development Policies and Interventions to Address Novel and Emerging Societal Problems"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Economics, Policies and Rural Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Francesco Caracciolo
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Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, 80055 Naples, Italy
Interests: development economics; food economics; ecosystem services; rural development; sustainable consumption
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Danilo Bertoni
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Science and Policy, University of Milan, Milano, Italy
Interests: environmental economics; rural development; sustainable agriculture; agricultural economics; agricultural policies
Prof. Dr. Raffaele Cortignani
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural and Forest Sciences, Tuscia University, Viterbo, Italy
Interests: economic modeling; sustainable agriculture; forecasts; environmental analysis; mathematical programming; farm management; climate change; agricultural policies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The COVID-19 pandemic is emphasizing the importance of a resilient food system that ensures affordable food for consumers and helps to uncover the existing critical interrelations between ecosystem preservation, food system characteristics, and health. The need for a transition toward a more sustainable food system maximizing environmental, health, and social benefits while supporting economic growth is therefore particularly needed.

To foster this transition, countries are asked to orient their policy interventions in agriculture to improve their response to societal demands on food and health, including safe, nutritious, and sustainable food. Agricultural policies need to adapt to the current challenges, which leads to two relevant and related research gaps. Empirical evidence on the fitness and suitability of traditional measures and interventions in agriculture in achieving the expected outcomes and impact is particularly limited with regard to novel expectations and requests. The latter requires a better understanding of farm responses, of farmers’ willingness and capacity to adhere to the policy measures, and how these might impact the environmental and economic farming dimensions. Secondly, the need for the development of new methodologies and tools to analyze and deeply understand the impact of policy decisions on the novel spheres has been accelerated.

The Special Issue aims to include both empirical research articles and conceptual pieces covering (but not limited to) all stages of the agri-food system, from production to distribution, marketing, and consumption, which may contribute to develop an evidence base for rural development policies and interventions to address novel, emerging societal problems in both developed and developing countries.

Prof. Dr. Francesco Caracciolo
Prof. Dr. Danilo Bertoni
Prof. Dr. Raffaele Cortignani
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Rural development programs
  • Agri-environmental policies
  • Sustainable agriculture.
  • Ecosystem services
  • Sustainable development
  • Agri-environmental measures
  • Policy evaluation
  • Impact assessment
  • Environmental laws and policy
  • Ecological intensification

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Feminization of Agriculture: Do Female Farmers Have Higher Expectations for the Value of Their Farmland?—Empirical Evidence from China
Agriculture 2022, 12(1), 60; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture12010060 - 04 Jan 2022
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Abstract
An individual’s expectations for the value of farmland are a manifestation of his or her awareness of farmland rights and interests. Differences between male and female farmers in their use of farmland, employment, education, and rights protection may ultimately lead to differences in [...] Read more.
An individual’s expectations for the value of farmland are a manifestation of his or her awareness of farmland rights and interests. Differences between male and female farmers in their use of farmland, employment, education, and rights protection may ultimately lead to differences in the evaluation of land value between the two groups. Clarifying such gender differences in the valuation of farmland and the reasons for them is of great significance for the formulation of policies and scientific research in areas such as the protection of rural women’s rights, nonagricultural employment, and land transfer. In the context of the global “feminization of agriculture”, we start with individuals’ psychological expectations for the value of farmland. We use data on farmland from the 2015 China Household Finance Survey (CHFS) and estimate an OLS regression model. The moderating effects model identifies the impact of gender differences on such expectations and the underlying mechanism. We find that (1) rural female farmers’ psychological expectations for the value of farmland are much lower than those of males due to their disadvantages in receiving information through policy publicization and their greater willingness to transfer into nonagricultural employment, and (2), according to the heterogeneity analysis, better educated female farmers and those living in areas with greater economic and social development expect farmland to be more valuable. These conclusions show that female farmers are currently less aware of their economic rights in rural China than male farmers, and that education, policy propaganda, and economic and social underdevelopment hinder their awareness of women’s rights. We propose policy suggestions to ensure women’s educational rights, promote the adjustment of the industrial structure and of policy propaganda, and balance regional economic and social development. Full article
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Article
Study on Livelihood Vulnerability and Adaptation Strategies of Farmers in Areas Threatened by Different Disaster Types under Climate Change
Agriculture 2021, 11(11), 1088; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11111088 - 03 Nov 2021
Viewed by 502
Abstract
The intensification of global climate change leads to frequent mountain torrents, landslides, debris flows and other disasters, which seriously threaten the safety of residents’ lives and property. However, few studies have compared and analyzed the livelihood vulnerability and adaptation strategies of farmers in [...] Read more.
The intensification of global climate change leads to frequent mountain torrents, landslides, debris flows and other disasters, which seriously threaten the safety of residents’ lives and property. However, few studies have compared and analyzed the livelihood vulnerability and adaptation strategies of farmers in different disaster-threatened areas under the background of climate change. Based on survey data of 327 households in the areas threatened by mountain floods, landslides and debris flow in Sichuan Province, this study analyzed the characteristics of livelihood vulnerability and adaptation strategies of households in the areas threatened by different disaster types and constructed multinomial logistic regression models to explore their correlations. The findings show that: (1) The livelihood vulnerability indices of farmers in different hazard types showed different characteristics. Among them, the livelihood vulnerability index of farmers in landslide-threatened zones is the highest, followed by the livelihood vulnerability index of farmers in debris-flow-threatened zones, and finally the livelihood vulnerability index of farmers in flash flood threat zones. At the same time, all three natural hazards show a trend of higher vulnerability in the sensitivity dimension than in the exposure and livelihood resilience dimensions. (2) The nonfarming livelihood strategy is the main livelihood strategy for farmers in different disaster-type-threatened areas. At the same time, the vulnerability of farmers choosing the nonfarming livelihood strategy is much higher than that of farmers choosing the part-time livelihood strategy and pure farming livelihood strategy, and the vulnerability of sensitivity dimension is higher than that of the exposure dimension and livelihood resilience dimension. (3) For farmers in landslide- and debris-flow-threatened areas, livelihood resilience is an important factor affecting their livelihood strategy. There was a positive correlation between livelihood resilience and farmers’ choice of pure agricultural livelihood strategies in these two natural-disaster-threatened areas. This study deepens our understanding of the characteristics and relationships of farmers’ livelihood vulnerability and adaptation strategies under different disaster types in the context of climate change, and then provides the reference basis for the formulation of livelihood-adaptive capacity promotion-related policy. Full article
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Article
Risk Perception of Rural Land Supply Reform in China: From the Perspective of Stakeholders
Agriculture 2021, 11(7), 646; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11070646 - 09 Jul 2021
Viewed by 677
Abstract
The reform of rural land supply market has a profound impact on the rural management and agricultural development. In this article, we want to explore risk perception of multi-subject land supply reform in China. The perception of potential risks from the perspective of [...] Read more.
The reform of rural land supply market has a profound impact on the rural management and agricultural development. In this article, we want to explore risk perception of multi-subject land supply reform in China. The perception of potential risks from the perspective of stakeholders can evaluate the effect of a certain behavioral decision and provide a convincing explanation for further risk control. Based on theoretical analysis and practical investigation, we define the five stakeholders, namely collective economic organizations, farmers, local government, banks and land users, as the respondents of our questionnaire survey. Through in-depth interviews and literature review, we obtained the categories of risks with stakeholders. Data were obtained through questionnaire survey, a total of 307 surveys were conducted to analyze the probability of risk occurrence and the severity of consequences. Frequency analysis, risk matrix method, and Borda count method were used to analyze the survey results in order to determine the risk level and key risk. The research finds that the information asymmetry risk perceived by farmers and the market risk perceived by banks are key risks. In terms of stakeholders, famers and banks perceived the highest overall risks. It implies that the information-disadvantaged stakeholder is usually the one with a strong sense of risk. Full article
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