Special Issue "The Complex Roles of Viruses in Agroecosystems"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Pest and Disease Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Laura Miozzi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute For Sustainable Plant Protection, National Research Council, Strada Delle Cacce 73, 10135 Torino, Italy
Interests: plant virology; bioinformatics; plant–virus interactions; virus biodiversity; virome characterization; RNA interference
Dr. Gian Paolo Accotto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute For Sustainable Plant Protection, National Research Council, Strada Delle Cacce 73, 10135 Torino, Italy
Interests: plant virology; geminivirus; plant–virus interactions; plant virus evolution; diagnostic methods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In agriculture, viruses are still perceived essentially as plant pathogens, with a strongly negative connotation: they cause devastating losses in crop production worldwide, thus representing a serious threat to global food security.

Nevertheless, with the advent of “omics” in all fields of biology, it has become clear that viruses are ubiquitous and that their diversity was grossly underestimated as well as their implications for food security. As a consequence, attitudes towards viruses in agriculture are gradually evolving, because we now recognize that, besides directly infecting crops, they can impact the agroecosystem at different trophic levels, above and below ground. There are cases where viruses have a positive role, helping plants to better deal with biotic or abiotic stresses. Furthermore, viruses can interact with insects, symbiotic and pathogenic fungi, bacteria, weeds, and any other living being, thus contributing positively or negatively to the final crop yield. The role of viruses on soil microorganism populations, for example, is largely unexplored.

This Special Issue welcomes contributions that improve our understanding of plant–virus interactions and explore the complex role of viruses in agroecosystems, with the ultimate aim of improving the sustainability of agronomic practices. Studies that approach this issue from molecular, physiological, or agroecological points of view will be considered.

Dr. Laura Miozzi
Dr. Gian Accotto
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • viruses
  • agroecosystems
  • plant–virus interactions
  • virus–host interactions
  • molecular crosstalk
  • multitrophic interactions
  • RNA interference
  • sustainable agriculture
  • biological control

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Communication
A Survey of Five Plant Viruses in Weeds and Tobacco in Poland
Agronomy 2021, 11(8), 1667; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agronomy11081667 - 21 Aug 2021
Viewed by 456
Abstract
Weeds may contribute to the spread of plant virus epidemics by acting as reservoirs of viruses or/and their vectors. The aim of this research was to study the prevalence of five viral pathogens in weeds in the fields of solanaceous crops in six [...] Read more.
Weeds may contribute to the spread of plant virus epidemics by acting as reservoirs of viruses or/and their vectors. The aim of this research was to study the prevalence of five viral pathogens in weeds in the fields of solanaceous crops in six provinces in Poland differing with soil and climate conditions. Most of the sampled sites were associated with tobacco production. The total number of 157 samples of tobacco and 600 samples of weeds were subjected to DAS-ELISA detection of tomato spotted wilt orthotospovirus (TSWV), cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), potato virus Y (PVY), tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV). Twenty nine percent of samples of weeds were infected with at least one virus. TSWV and TMV were the most frequently detected in 17.5% and 14.7% of samples, respectively. In most provinces where infected tobacco was found, the same virus was also detected in weeds. Results of this survey are discussed in the context of the current status of virus epidemics in tobacco fields in Poland. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Complex Roles of Viruses in Agroecosystems)
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Article
Incidence of GLMD-Like Symptoms on Grapevines Naturally Infected by Grapevine Pinot gris virus, Boron Content and Gene Expression Analysis of Boron Metabolism Genes
Agronomy 2021, 11(6), 1020; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agronomy11061020 - 21 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 527
Abstract
Grapevine Pinot gris virus (GPGV) is considered to be a causal agent of Grapevine Leaf Mottling and Deformation (GLMD) disease that has been reported worldwide through the grapevine-growing regions. Seven grapevines that were collected from a vineyard in the Czech Republic were tested [...] Read more.
Grapevine Pinot gris virus (GPGV) is considered to be a causal agent of Grapevine Leaf Mottling and Deformation (GLMD) disease that has been reported worldwide through the grapevine-growing regions. Seven grapevines that were collected from a vineyard in the Czech Republic were tested for the presence of GPGV in leaf and phloem tissues. Each of the seven grapevines was infected by GPGV, from which sic symptoms were mostly shown without a typical mottling. The phylogeny based on RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and movement/coat protein sequences indicated the same origin of the GPGV isolates. The GPGV titer was the highest in the grapevines with the highest GLMD-like symptoms; however, some of the grapevines with milder GLMD-like symptoms had a lower GPGV titer than the asymptomatic grapevine. Soil analysis showed uneven boron content in the direct vicinity of the grapevines, while the boron content in the grapevines was more, even showing no boron deficiency. The quantitative analysis of selected gene expressions associated with boron efflux and transport only partially explained the boron content in the soil and grapevines and only in the grapevines growing in soils with the highest or lowest boron contents. The VvBor2 and VvNIP5 genes had a higher expression and VvNIP6 had a lower expression in the grapevine growing in the soil with the lowest boron content, while a low expression of VvBor1 and VvBor2 was observed in the grapevine that was grown in the soil with the highest boron content. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Complex Roles of Viruses in Agroecosystems)
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