Special Issue "Transforming AgriFood Systems under a Changing Climate"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ajit Govind
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Cairo, Egypt
2. Institut National de Recherche pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement (INRAE), Villenave-d'Ornon, France
Interests: climate mitigation and adaptation; biogeochemical modeling; ecohydrological modeling; crop productivity and biophysical environment; remote sensing & geoinformatics
Dr. Chandrashekhar M. Biradar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Cairo, Egypt
Interests: digital augmentation for sustainable intensification; excellence in agronomy; agroecology; system level solutions for agri-food system transformation; geospatial application; precision agriculture for small-holders; water productivity and landscape restoration

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Global agriculture is highly vulnerable to a changing climate especially in resource-limited and climate-dependent (e.g. rainfed) contexts. Agriculture remains the livelihood of small holder farmers in most of the developing nations and the agri-food systems remain fragile. Climate change induced vulnerability on agrifood systems has a strong impact on increasing socio-economic challenges as well. Therefore, a radical agrifood transformation is necessary. A dedicated compendium of knowledge products focused on this domain is limited. This special issue of Agronomy is specifically dedicated to addressing transformational perspective of the agri-food systems in resource limited contexts under a changing climate. All the papers need to have that spirit rather than the routine type of study. Thus, the papers need to explicitly discuss how their research studies, tools, technology, etc. contribute or has potential to contribute to agri-food transformation under climate and land use changes. We invite contributions that address the topic at all scales (plot, farm, landscape, and regional). Some example topics are (but not limited to):

  • Integrated and system level solutions for agronomic and agro-ecological gains.
  • Studies on soil and water for sustainable intensification.
  • Studies on enhancing land and crop water productivities.
  • Systems modeling (agronomic gains, vulnerability assessment, identifying adaptation options, foresight breeding).
  • Approaches to achieving climate smart agronomy (Bigdata, ICTs, enabling environments).
  • Studies on digital advisories and early warning systems (digital augmentation, platforms and applications).
  • Crop diversification and crop–livestock–tree mixture.
  • Studies on reducing (or reversing) land degradation and desertification.
  • Studies on spatial modeling and geospatial studies on agriculture.
  • Studies on socioeconomic and ecological issues affecting agriculture.

We encourage all forms of knowledge contributions such as research articles, reviews, short communications, technical notes and opinion papers. We look forward to receiving your submissions to this special issue.

Dr. Ajit Govind
Dr. Chandrashekhar M. Biradar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Climate adaptation in agroecosystems by enhancing water productivity at all scales
  • Decarbonization of agroecosystems (carbon sequestration and reducing GHG fluxes)
  • Designing early warning systems and advisories towards enhancing climate smartness
  • Development of digital tools (ICTs) in agricultural and AgriFood transformation and NRM
  • Capacity development in climate adaptation and mitigation in global drylands
  • Fostering multi-institutional dialogues in large climate initiatives.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Simulation of Staple Crop Yields for Determination of Regional Impacts of Climate Change: A Case Study in Chonnam Province, Republic of Korea
Agronomy 2021, 11(12), 2544; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agronomy11122544 - 15 Dec 2021
Viewed by 403
Abstract
This study sought to simulate regional variation in staple crop yields in Chonnam Province, Republic of Korea (ROK), in future environments under climate change based on the calibration of crop models in the Decision Support System for Agricultural Technology Transfer 4.6 package. We [...] Read more.
This study sought to simulate regional variation in staple crop yields in Chonnam Province, Republic of Korea (ROK), in future environments under climate change based on the calibration of crop models in the Decision Support System for Agricultural Technology Transfer 4.6 package. We reproduced multiple-year yield data for paddy rice (2013–2018), barley (2000–2018), and soybean (2004–2018) grown in experimental fields at Naju, Chonnam Province, using the CERES-Rice, CERES-Barley, and CROPGRO-Soybean models. A geospatial crop simulation modeling (GCSM) system developed using the crop models was then applied to simulate the regional impacts of climate change on the staple crops according to the Representative Concentration Pathway 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios. Simulated crop yields agreed with the corresponding measured crop yields, with root means square deviations of 0.31 ton ha−1 for paddy rice, 0.29 ton ha−1 for barley, and 0.27 ton ha−1 for soybean. We also demonstrated that the GCSM system could effectively simulate spatiotemporal variations in the impact of climate change on staple crop yield. The CERES and CROPGRO models seem to reproduce the effects of climate change on region-wide staple crop production in a monsoonal climate system. Added advancements of the GCSM system could facilitate interpretations of future food resource insecurity and establish a sustainable adaption strategy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transforming AgriFood Systems under a Changing Climate)
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Article
Global Sensitivity Analysis for CERES-Rice Model under Different Cultivars and Specific-Stage Variations of Climate Parameters
Agronomy 2021, 11(12), 2446; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agronomy11122446 - 30 Nov 2021
Viewed by 262
Abstract
Global sensitivity analysis (SA) has become an efficient way to identify the most influential parameters on model results. However, the effects of cultivar variation and specific-stage variations of climate conditions on model outputs still remain unclear. In this study, 30 indica hybrid rice [...] Read more.
Global sensitivity analysis (SA) has become an efficient way to identify the most influential parameters on model results. However, the effects of cultivar variation and specific-stage variations of climate conditions on model outputs still remain unclear. In this study, 30 indica hybrid rice cultivars were simulated in the CERES-Rice model; then the Sobol’ method was used to perform a global SA on 16 investigated parameters for three model outputs (anthesis day, maturity day, and yield). In addition, we also compared the differences in the sensitivity results under four specific-stage variations (vegetative phase, panicle-formation phase, ripening phase, and the whole growth season) of climate conditions. The results indicated that (1) parameter Tavg, G4, and P2O are the most influential parameters for all model outputs across cultivars during the whole growth season; (2) under the vegetative-phase variation of climate parameters; the variability of model outputs is mainly controlled by parameter P2O and Tavg; (3) under the panicle-formation-phase or ripening-phase variation of climate parameters, parameter P2O was the dominant variable for all model outputs; (4) parameter PORM had a considerable effect (the total sensitivity index, STi; STi>0.05) on yield regardless of the various specific-stage variations of the climate parameters. Findings obtained from this study will contribute to understanding the comprehensive effects of crop parameters on model outputs under different cultivars and specific-stage variations of climate conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transforming AgriFood Systems under a Changing Climate)
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Article
Socio-Economic Implications and Potential Structural Adaptations of the Tunisian Agricultural Sector to Climate Change
Agronomy 2021, 11(11), 2112; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agronomy11112112 - 21 Oct 2021
Viewed by 391
Abstract
Climate change is expected to have serious economic and social impacts on Tunisian rural farmers. The extent of these impacts will largely depend on the level of political and structural adaptations. This study aims to evaluate the effect of increasing water shortages on [...] Read more.
Climate change is expected to have serious economic and social impacts on Tunisian rural farmers. The extent of these impacts will largely depend on the level of political and structural adaptations. This study aims to evaluate the effect of increasing water shortages on agricultural income and employment. It also analyzes structural adaptation strategies implemented by farmers in response to this challenge. We have therefore developed a regionally disaggregated supply model to simulate three types of scenarios concerning (i) decreasing quantities of irrigation water at the regional level; (ii) enhanced irrigation water use efficiency; and (iii) higher production prices. Observed crop production data for 21 crops and 24 districts of Tunisia have been used. Districts have been aggregated into five regions based on bioclimatic homogeneity. Results show that climate change will lead to the reduction of irrigated areas and an increased importance of rainfed agriculture. It will also have a negative impact on farm income and employment. This negative effect can be fully mitigated by improving water use efficiency, at farm and perimeter levels, and can be reversed by offering more attractive producer prices to farmers through enhanced value chain integration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transforming AgriFood Systems under a Changing Climate)
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