Special Issue "Fluorescence Techniques: Understanding Crop Performance"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Innovative Cropping Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Uwe Rascher
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
IBG-2: Plant Sciences, Institute of Bio- und Geosciences, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich, Germany
Interests: ecophysiology of photosynthesis; plant stress physiology; field phenotyping; optical remote sensing; understanding of sun-induced fluorescence; high-resolution imaging spectroscopy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Onno Muller
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
IBG-2: Plant Sciences, Institute of Bio- und Geosciences, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich, Germany

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fluorescence techniques have been widely used in laboratory and greenhouse studies to non-invasively measure the actual status of photosynthetic light reactions. Nowadays, the recent developments in sensor technology facilitate the quantification of the fluorescence signal under field conditions, and we are experiencing a greatly increasing number of sensors and measurement approaches that are developed for field applications in agriculture. Modern plant phenotyping and the rapidly expanding capabilities of remote sensing are currently opening fundamental new paths to understand the dynamic nature of crop adaptation to their changing environment. These fluorescence techniques are well-suited to quantify the fast acclimation of crop photosynthesis to the rapidly changing environmental conditions, as well as to quantify the seasonal dynamics of crop performance under various stress conditions.

In this Special Issue, we welcome publications that use established and novel fluorescence approaches to better understand the dynamics of photosynthetic traits in crops. Topics may cover but are not limited to:

  • Description of new fluorescence sensors and measurement approaches that are designed for agricultural systems
  • Active and passive fluorescence approaches to better understand the dynamic nature of crop photosynthesis
  • Field phenotyping studies that include fluorescence approaches
  • Remote sensing studies that use ground, airborne, or satellite fluorescence approaches to monitor plant photosynthesis

Prof. Dr. Uwe Rascher
Dr. Onno Muller
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Active and passive fluorescence techniques
  • Solar-induced fluorescence
  • Laser-induced fluorescence
  • Dynamic acclimation of photosynthesis
  • Crop energy metabolism
  • Dynamics of light reaction in crops

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Chlorophyll α Fluorescence Parameters as an Indicator to Identify Drought Susceptibility in Common Bush Bean
Agronomy 2019, 9(9), 526; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agronomy9090526 - 09 Sep 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 742
Abstract
The common bean is susceptible to drought conditions and the evaluation of plant responses to low water availability can be difficult. The quantification of chlorophyll fluorescence as a sensitive trait to environmental stresses is an important alternative in the characterization of drought-susceptible genotypes. [...] Read more.
The common bean is susceptible to drought conditions and the evaluation of plant responses to low water availability can be difficult. The quantification of chlorophyll fluorescence as a sensitive trait to environmental stresses is an important alternative in the characterization of drought-susceptible genotypes. The objective of this study was to evaluate mainly the use of chlorophyll α fluorescence (maximum efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm), photochemical quenching (qP), non-photochemical quenching (NPQ)) and rapid light-response curves (RLCs) (initial slope of the curve (α), minimum saturation irradiance (Ik) and maximum relative electron transport rate (ETRmax)) parameters as tools for the identification of susceptible or tolerant bush bean cultivars to water deficit stress conditions in two different phenological stages. Using a randomized block design in a factorial arrangement, five bush bean cultivars (Cerinza, Bachue, NUA35, Bacata and Bianca) were evaluated under water deficit conditions by the suspension of irrigation for 15 days from 40 to 55 Days after Emergence (DAE) (vegetative stage) or 50 to 65 DAE (reproductive stage). The results showed that Fv/Fm and NPQ recorded the highest variation due to water deficit conditions, especially in the vegetative stage. The greatest reductions in Fv/Fm (0.67) and NPQ (0.71) were evidenced in cultivar NUA35 compared to its control plants (0.78 and 1.07, respectively). The parameters obtained from RLCs showed that cultivar Bacata registered the lowest α (0.17) and Ik (838.19 μmol∙m−2∙s−1) values compared to its control plants (α 0.23; Ik 769.99 μmol∙m−2∙s−1). Differences were only obtained in ETRmax in the reproductive stage (50–65 DAE) in which cultivar NUA35 reached values of 158.5 in stressed plants compared to control plants (251.22). In conclusion, the parameters derived from RLCs such as α and Ik can be used as tools to identify drought susceptibility in the vegetative stage, whereas ETRmax can be used in the reproductive stage. In addition, PSII photochemistry (Fv/Fm and NPQ) can also help to understand the agronomic responses of common bush bean cultivars to drought conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescence Techniques: Understanding Crop Performance)
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Article
Physiological, Biochemical and Chlorophyll Fluorescence Parameters of Physalis Peruviana L. Seedlings Exposed to Different Short-Term Waterlogging Periods and Fusarium Wilt Infection
Agronomy 2019, 9(5), 213; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agronomy9050213 - 26 Apr 2019
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 1338
Abstract
Cape gooseberry has coped with abiotic and biotic stresses such as prolonged waterlogging periods and vascular wilt in recent years. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of four waterlogging periods on stomatal conductance (gs), leaf water potential [...] Read more.
Cape gooseberry has coped with abiotic and biotic stresses such as prolonged waterlogging periods and vascular wilt in recent years. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of four waterlogging periods on stomatal conductance (gs), leaf water potential (Ψwf), plant growth, leaf photosynthetic pigments, malondialdehyde (MDA) production, proline content and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters in cape gooseberry plants infected with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. physali (Foph). Two-month-old ecotype “Colombia” plants were arranged in a completely randomized factorial design in eight treatments: plants without waterlogging (control), plants with waterlogging for 4, 6 and 8 d with and without Foph, respectively. The area under the disease progress curve was higher in inoculated plants subjected to 6 and 8 d of waterlogging (55.25 and 64.25) compared to inoculated plants but without waterlogging (45.25). The results also showed a lower plant growth, gs, Ψwf, leaf photosynthetic pigments and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters (Fv/Fm, electron transport rate (ETR), Y (II) and qP) as waterlogging periods in plants with Foph increased. However, this group of plants showed a greater proline and malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulation and a higher NPQ. In conclusion, cape gooseberry shows a low acclimation to waterlogging conditions of more than 6 d in soils with Foph. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescence Techniques: Understanding Crop Performance)
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Article
Seasonal Variation in Diurnal Photosynthesis and Chlorophyll Fluorescence of Four Genotypes of Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) under Irrigation Conditions in a Tropical Savanna Climate
Agronomy 2019, 9(4), 206; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agronomy9040206 - 23 Apr 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1760
Abstract
Photosynthesis performance during early vegetative growth is an important physiological trait determining yield of cassava, but limited information is currently available for the tropical savanna climate of Asia. Diurnal photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence of the three-month-old plants of four commercial cassava genotypes (Rayong [...] Read more.
Photosynthesis performance during early vegetative growth is an important physiological trait determining yield of cassava, but limited information is currently available for the tropical savanna climate of Asia. Diurnal photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence of the three-month-old plants of four commercial cassava genotypes (Rayong 9, RY9; Rayong 11, RY11; Kasetsart 50, KU50 and CMR38-125-77) grown under irrigation, were investigated in three seasons i.e., rainy, cool and hot. The mean daily net photosynthetic rate (Pn) across genotypes in the rainy season (11.75 µmolCO2/m2/s) was significantly lower than that in the cool season (14.60 µmolCO2/m2/s). Daily mean Pn in the hot season was 14.32 µmolCO2/m2/s. In the rainy season, maximum photochemical quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm) and effective quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (ΦPSII) were significantly higher than the other seasons, while electron transfer rate (ETR) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) were significantly lower. Genotypic variation was observed during the hot season in which RY11 had the highest and CMR38-125-77 the lowest mean daily Pn. The prominent mechanism to avoid damages from stress during afternoon in the hot season was to reduce leaf temperature by enhancing transpiration for RY11; to close stomata early for RY9, and to increase NPQ for CMR38-125-77. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescence Techniques: Understanding Crop Performance)
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