Special Issue "Industrial Waste for Crops Production: Effects on Soil Nutrient Dynamics, Crop Growth and Food Quality"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Soil and Plant Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mumtaz Cheema
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Science and the Environment, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Corner Brook, NL A2H 5G4, Canada
Interests: Integrated nutrient management; nutrient cycling; sustainable cropping systems; boreal climate; agronomic crops; horticultural crops; growth media/formulations; soil amendments; industrial waste; wood ash; wood sludge; dairy digestate; rock dust; fish waste; abiotic stresses management strategies; stress tolerance; GHG emission monitoring; GHG emission mitigation; crop rotation/cover crops; biochar; nitrification inhibitors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Muhammad Nadeem
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Science and the Environment, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Corner Brook, NL A2H 5G4, Canada
Interests: sustainable agroecosystem; crop production; forage crops; forage quality; grain crops; inter and monocropping; soil fertility; soil health; integrated nutrient management; soil nutrient dynamics; industrial waste; soil amendments; podzolic soils; mitigating GHG emissions; abiotic stress; plant lipidomics; boreal climate

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Feeding the burgeoning world population, 7.79 billion in 2020 and projected to increase to 9.5 billion by 2050, necessitates an increase in agricultural production of about 70% between 2020 and 2050. Soil degradation, characterized by a decline in quality and health, is a major constraint for achieving the required increase in agricultural production. To attain sustainable crop production and soil health without damaging the environment under a climate change scenario, it is important to explore the potential of industrial wastes as a liming and mineral nutrient source. For example, livestock and dairy industries, forestry, fisheries, mining, and pulp and paper industries produce an enormous amount of waste products each year. Disposing of such large amounts could cause environmental degradation and a great financial burden. There is a need to explore alternate options to efficiently utilize these waste products to enhance soil fertility for sustainable crop production and reduce carbon footprints. Investigating the effects of waste products as a soil amendment on soil physiochemical properties, heavy-metal contamination risks, active microbial communities, nutrient dynamics, soil enzyme activities, plant growth, crop production under controlled environmental and field conditions is imperative to improve soil and crop quality and health. For this Special Issue, submissions on the following topics (but not limited to) are invited:

  • Industrial waste as a soil amendment and potting media
  • Effect of soil amendments on soil physiochemical properties
  • Effect of soil amendments on soil quality and health
  • Soil nutrient dynamics and soil fertility
  • Effects of soil amendment on crop growth, yield and produce quality
  • Heavy metal contamination risk assessment

Dr. Mumtaz Cheema
Dr. Muhammad Nadeem
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Soil amendments
  • Organic soil amendments
  • Soil fertility
  • Nutrient cycling
  • Industrial waste
  • Agro-industrial waste
  • Crop growth
  • Crop quality
  • Nutrient uptake
  • Cropping systems
  • Sustainable agroecosystem

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Comparative Effects of Bio-Wastes in Combination with Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria on Growth and Productivity of Okra
Agronomy 2021, 11(10), 2065; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agronomy11102065 - 14 Oct 2021
Viewed by 454
Abstract
Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria with multiple growth-promoting traits play a significant role in soil to improve soil health, crop growth and yield. Recent research studies have focused on the integration of organic amendments with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) to enhance soil fertility and reduce [...] Read more.
Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria with multiple growth-promoting traits play a significant role in soil to improve soil health, crop growth and yield. Recent research studies have focused on the integration of organic amendments with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) to enhance soil fertility and reduce the hazardous effects of chemical fertilizers. This study aims to evaluate the integrated application of biochar, compost, fruit and vegetable waste, and Bacillus subtilis (SMBL 1) to soil in sole application and in combined form. The study comprises eight treatments—four treatments without inoculation and four treatments with SMBL 1 inoculation in a completely randomized design (CRD), under factorial settings with four replications. The results indicate that the integrated treatments significantly improved okra growth and yield compared with sole applications. The integration of SMBL 1 with biochar showed significant improvements in plant height, root length, leaf chlorophyll a and b, leaf relative water content, fruit weight, diameter and length by 29, 29, 50, 53.3, 4.3, 44.7 and 40.4%, respectively, compared with control. Similarly, fruit N, P and K contents were improved by 33, 52.7 and 25.6% and Fe and Zn in shoot were 37.1 and 35.6%, respectively, compared with control. The results of this study reveal that the integration of SMBL 1 with organic amendments is an effective approach to the sustainable production of okra. Full article
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