Special Issue "Innovative Technologies for Conservation, Protection and Quality of Vegetables and Fruits in a Post-Harvest Period - Series II"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Horticultural and Floricultural Crops".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Anna Kocira
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Agricultural Sciences, State School of Higher Education in Chełm, Pocztowa 54, 22-100 Chełm, Poland
Interests: abiotic stress; biostimulants; crop production; plant physiology; plant pathology; plant protection; nutritional and nutraceutical quality; vegetables; legumes
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Katarzyna Panasiewicz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Agronomy Department, Poznań University of Life Sciences, Dojazd 11, 60-632 Poznań, Poland
Interests: agronomy; irrigation and water management; tillage system; legumes; seed quality; seed vigor; plant protection
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Ewa Szpunar-Krok
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Natural Sciences, University of Rzeszow, Zelwerowicza 4, 35-601 Rzeszów, Poland
Interests: crop production; abiotic stress; plant physiology; plant fertilization; plant protection; vegetables; legumes; plant product quality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Taking into account that the first edition of our Special Issue aroused great interest among researchers from different research centers, we would like to propose its continuation. Multifaceted research presented in this Special Issue indicates the need for a continuous search for innovative technological solutions that will improve the quality of vegetables, fruits and other plants used in human nutrition. Usage of proper agricultural technology, including fertilization and plant protection, is important for obtaining high yields of good quality in plant production. Protective treatments are also important post-harvest and during the storage and processing of these plant materials, as they are still exposed to abiotic factors and/or the action of agrofags (pathogens and pests). The United Nations General Assembly also stressed the importance of promoting plant health with motto "Protecting plants, protecting life", promoting the use of innovative protective treatments that are safe for humans and the environment, also in the post-harvest period.

The new Special Issue promotes technologies used for conservation and protection of vegetables, fruits and other plants important in human nutrition, which contribute to improvement of their post-harvest quality, including processing, consumption and health-promoting values. Research articles cover topics related to management of vegetables, fruits and other plants that meet human nutritional needs, including handling during harvesting and storage, and protective treatments applied in their storage to better use new post-harvest biotechnology. Applications of methods of preserving fruit, vegetables or other plants used in human nutrition, which also protect them against pathogens and pests in order to preserve their nutritional value and organoleptic properties, is also emphasized. Research articles dealing with pre-harvest agrotechnical treatments that have a significant impact on the durability and quality of stored plant products are also welcome in this issue. All types of articles, such as original research, opinions and reviews are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Anna Kocira
Prof. Dr. Katarzyna Panasiewicz
Prof. Dr. Ewa Szpunar-Krok
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • vegetables, fruits and herbs
  • post-harvest technology and durability, quality and organoleptic evaluation
  • new technologies for conservation, storage and processing
  • post-harvest stability
  • nutritional, organoleptic and health properties
  • product quality and safety
  • disorders, diseases and post-harvest protection
  • non chemical and chemical control
  • factors before harvest affecting post-harvest quality

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
The Effect of Microwave Treatment on Germination and Health of Carrot (Daucus carota L.) Seeds
Agronomy 2021, 11(12), 2571; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agronomy11122571 - 17 Dec 2021
Viewed by 327
Abstract
The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of microwave treatment on seed germination and health of carrot seeds using two seed lots naturally infected with the pathogens Alternaria dauci and A. radicina. Seeds of cv. Amsterdam and cv. Berlikumer [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of microwave treatment on seed germination and health of carrot seeds using two seed lots naturally infected with the pathogens Alternaria dauci and A. radicina. Seeds of cv. Amsterdam and cv. Berlikumer varied in seed germination at the final count (50% and 29%, respectively), and seed infestation with A. radicina (38% and 5%, respectively). For treatment, seeds were placed in a Petri dish (dry treatment) or in a beaker with distilled water (wet treatment) and irradiated at power output levels 500, 650 and 750 W for 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 s. Germination and health were determined in treated and untreated (control) seed samples. Wet treatment controlled seed-borne fungi more efficiently than dry treatment. However, the exposure duration longer than 60 s frequently resulted in deterioration of seed germination. The highest seed germination in cv. Amsterdam was observed after microwave wet treatment at power output levels of 500 W for 75 s (81%), 650 W for 45 s (85%), and 750 W for 60 s (77%), whereas in the case of cv. Berlikumer this occurred when wet seeds were treated at 500 and 650 W for 60 s (46% and 43% respectively). Treating seeds soaked in water with microwaves for a period longer than 30 s, regardless of the power output, significantly decreased seed infestation with Alternaria spp. in both samples. Full article
Article
Chemical Composition of Fir, Pine and Thyme Essential Oils and Their Effect on Onion (Allium cepa L.) Seed Quality
Agronomy 2021, 11(12), 2445; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agronomy11122445 - 30 Nov 2021
Viewed by 380
Abstract
Botrytis allii and B. cinerea are important seed-transmitted pathogens of onion. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical compositions of fir, pine and thyme essential oils and evaluate their effects on the germination, vigour and health of onion seeds. Gas [...] Read more.
Botrytis allii and B. cinerea are important seed-transmitted pathogens of onion. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical compositions of fir, pine and thyme essential oils and evaluate their effects on the germination, vigour and health of onion seeds. Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy was used for the analysis of the oils’ chemical compositions. Seed germination, vigour and health tests were performed on untreated seeds and on seeds treated with volatile compounds of the oils applied at a concentration of 0.2 µL cm−3 for 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h or at a concentration of 0.4 µL cm−3 for 3, 6 and 12 h. The main components of fir oil were bornyl acetate (55.5%) and α-pinene (15.6%), pine oil contained mostly α-pinene (35.5%) and β-pinene (18.6%), and thymol (34.2%) and p-cymene (26.2%) prevailed in thyme oil. Almost all treatments significantly reduced seed infestation with Alternaria alternata and Fusarium spp., and some effectively controlled Botrytis spp., however, seed health improvement was usually associated with deterioration of seed germination and vigour. Only treatment with fir oil at a concentration of 0.2 µL cm−3 for 6 h effectively controlled seed-borne pathogens and positively affected seed germination. Considering the beneficial effect of the oils on seed health, further studies are necessary in order to establish the optimal conditions for onion seed treatment. Full article
Article
Effect of Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Concentration on the Quality of Minikiwi Fruits after Storage
Agronomy 2021, 11(11), 2251; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agronomy11112251 - 07 Nov 2021
Viewed by 365
Abstract
The rapid increase in the production of hardy kiwi fruit (A. arguta) since the beginning of the 21st century has required the development of new cultivation technologies and postharvest handling procedures in order to extend the supply and transport of the [...] Read more.
The rapid increase in the production of hardy kiwi fruit (A. arguta) since the beginning of the 21st century has required the development of new cultivation technologies and postharvest handling procedures in order to extend the supply and transport of the fruit to distant markets. Fruit storage focuses on the inhibition of ripening processes regulated by ethylene activity or respiration. Both of these are effectively regulated by appropriate concentrations of O2 and CO2 in the atmosphere surrounding the fruit. In this study, the effect of the concentration of both gases in the cold room on the physico-chemical indices of fruit quality, i.e., mass loss, firmness, soluble solids and monosaccharides content, titratable acidity and acid content, and color of the peel was evaluated. Studies have shown that high CO2 concentrations inhibit ripening processes more effectively than low O2 concentrations. Softening of berries as well as an increase in soluble solid contents was recorded during the first 4 weeks of storage in the fruit. However, the increase in monosaccharides was fairly stable throughout the study period. The increase in soluble solids content as well as the loss of acidity were more strongly determined by CO2 than O2, although the acid content in a 10% CO2 atmosphere did not change. Additionally, the fruits were greener after storage in 10% CO2, but the weakness was skin dulling and darkening. The results indicate that the use of high CO2 concentrations (5–10%) effectively inhibits ripening processes in fruit. After 12 weeks of storage, the fruit was still not suitable for direct consumption, which suggests that the storage period can be extended further. Full article
Article
Cold Stress during Flowering Alters Plant Structure, Yield and Seed Quality of Different Soybean Genotypes
Agronomy 2021, 11(10), 2059; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agronomy11102059 - 13 Oct 2021
Viewed by 378
Abstract
The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of cold stress at flowering stage on plant structure, yield and chemical composition of seeds of 15 soybean cultivars. The study was conducted in 2019–2020, using the complete randomization method, in three replications. [...] Read more.
The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of cold stress at flowering stage on plant structure, yield and chemical composition of seeds of 15 soybean cultivars. The study was conducted in 2019–2020, using the complete randomization method, in three replications. Fifteen soybean cultivars belonging to three maturity groups: early (EC), middle-early (MC) and late (LC) cultivars were included. Weekly cold stress (17/13 °C day/night) was applied at plant flowering stage. In the control treatment, plants were kept under natural conditions (24/17 °C day/night). Our research showed that cold stress negatively influenced the elements of plant structure: height, number of nodes, stem dry mass, number and weight of pods, number and weight of seeds per plant, as well as yield of soybean seeds, reducing it on average by 24%, as compared to the control treatment. The highest yield decrease was found in LC cultivars (31.2%), while a smaller and similar one in EC and MC cultivars (by 19.7 and 20.1%, respectively). Significant varietal differences were found for plant biometric traits and seed yield. EC cultivars had the lowest set first pod, as well as the lowest number of nodes, number of pods and seeds, pod and seed weight per plant, and seed yield. MC cultivars had the highest set first pod, and the smallest stem DM and seed yield average by 29.2% higher compared to EC cultivars. LC cultivars had the highest stem DM, number of pods and seeds, and pod and seed weight per plant compared to the other cultivar groups, and yield by 22.8% higher compared to EC cultivars. The experimental factors significantly affected crude protein, crude fat, and crude ash content, while they did not differentiate water-soluble carbohydrate and crude fiber content. Cold stress at the flowering stage caused a significant increase in protein content (by 4.1% on average) and ash content (by 3.8%) and a decrease in fat concentration (by 6.9%) in soybean seeds. Differences in nutrient content among cultivars were a genetic trait not related to cultivar maturity. Full article
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