Special Issue "Parasitic Diseases in Canine and Feline and Their Vectors"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Companion Animals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 December 2022 | Viewed by 1528

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Rodrigo Morchón
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Zoonotic Disease and One Heatlh Group, Faculty of Pharmacy, Campus Miguel Unamuno, University of Salamanca, 37007 Salamanca, Spain
Interests: zoonosis; pets; host/parasite relationship; pathology; vector-borne disease; One Health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Simona Gabrielli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro, 5, 00185 Rome, Italy
Interests: tropical diseases; parasitic diseases; infectious disease epidemiology; PCR; molecular biology; antibodies; ELISA; genetics; DNA; infection
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Fabio Macchioni
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Pisa, 56124 Pisa, Italy
Interests: parasite diagnostic tools; parasites
Dr. Elena Carretón
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Research Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences (IUIBS), University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35413 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
Interests: zoonosis; host/parasite relationship; cardiorespiratory medicine; small animals; vector-borne disease; One Health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Parasitic diseases in dogs and cats, both domestic and wild, are one of the most important problems for these living creatures. They are caused by various parasites, including protozoa, trematodes, cestodes, nematodes, and arthropods. These diseases cause severe and potentially fatal damage to their hosts, many of them being cosmopolitan diseases. Moreover, they cause important economic losses, both for the administration in the case of wild or stray animals, and for the owners in the case of domestic animals. Knowledge of the biology, the current epidemiological status in any region, parasite diagnosis and antiparasitic treatments, and control measures have an important role to play in society. In addition, it should be noted that many of these diseases are zoonotic, meaning that people can be affected, as well as the health care system, which is important from a One Health perspective; controlling these diseases and their consequences has a direct impact on the environment and human health.

We invite you to share your recent findings through this Special Issue, focused on all kinds of parasitic diseases in dogs and cats.

Dr. Rodrigo Morchón
Dr. Simona Gabrielli
Dr. Fabio Macchioni
Dr. Elena Carretón
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • parasitic diseases
  • dogs
  • cats
  • protozoa
  • trematodes
  • cestodes
  • nematodes
  • arthropods
  • vectors
  • One Health

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Expansion of Canine Heartworm in Spain
Animals 2022, 12(10), 1268; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ani12101268 - 14 May 2022
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Abstract
The climate of Spain has favourable characteristics for the development of D. immitis in dogs, being an endemic country. Given that vector-borne diseases are spreading rapidly through Europe, due to factors such as climate change, the expansion of vectors and the increased mobility [...] Read more.
The climate of Spain has favourable characteristics for the development of D. immitis in dogs, being an endemic country. Given that vector-borne diseases are spreading rapidly through Europe, due to factors such as climate change, the expansion of vectors and the increased mobility of reservoir animals, the aim was to update the epidemiology of heartworm in dogs and analyse the results based on climate and other epidemiological and geo-environmental factors. To this aim, 9543 blood samples from dogs from all provinces and autonomous cities of Spain were analysed for the detection of antigens of D. immitis, obtaining a prevalence of 6.47%. The northwestern and southern provinces showed the highest prevalences, as well as in the Balearic and Canary Islands. Prevalences were higher in dogs outdoors. Furthermore, most of the positive dogs were found in regions with high humidity and water availability. This study shows, for the first time, positive cases in provinces and islands where no cases had previously been described and demonstrates the continuous expansion and consolidation of heartworm in Spain. Considering its zoonotic character, the implementation of control and awareness programmes for the prevention of D. immitis in pets is necessary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Parasitic Diseases in Canine and Feline and Their Vectors)
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Communication
Molecular Survey of Dirofilaria and Leishmania Species in Dogs from Central Balkan
Animals 2022, 12(7), 911; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ani12070911 - 02 Apr 2022
Viewed by 558
Abstract
Dirofilariosis and leishmaniosis are severe parasitic diseases in dogs, and their causative agents can also be pathogenic to humans. In this study, we conducted a multicentric survey in the regions of Serbia and North Macedonia with the goal to establish an epidemiological scenario [...] Read more.
Dirofilariosis and leishmaniosis are severe parasitic diseases in dogs, and their causative agents can also be pathogenic to humans. In this study, we conducted a multicentric survey in the regions of Serbia and North Macedonia with the goal to establish an epidemiological scenario of dirofilariosis and leishmaniosis in the territory of Central Balkan. Using molecular analyses, a total of 535 dogs from Northern Serbia (NS), Southern Serbia (SS) and North Macedonia (NM) were screened for the presence of Dirofilaria spp. and Leishmania spp. We confirmed that Central Balkan is an endemic region for Dirofilaria (D.) immitis, as it was found to be the dominant species in this area, with the highest prevalence of 8.75% in NM, followed by NS (6.68%) and a significantly lower prevalence in SS (1.51%). Two dogs (2.5%) from NM were positive for Leishmania (L.) infantum infection. None of the dogs from Serbia tested positive for Leishmania spp. High prevalence and dominance of D. immitis species, and the rising threat of L. infantum spread to the territory of Serbia, suggest that preventive measures are of a great necessity to combat the spread of these vector-borne zoonoses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Parasitic Diseases in Canine and Feline and Their Vectors)
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