Special Issue "Antimicrobials and Antimicrobial Resistance: Current and Future Prospects"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Mechanism and Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Roman Kozlov
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, Smolensk State Medical University, 214019 Smolensk, Russia
Interests: antibiotics; antimicrobial resistance; mechanism of resistance; epidemiology of resistance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As everyone is aware, antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the biggest public health challenges of our time. It has been estimated that each year, at least 700,000 people across the world died from antibiotic-resistant infections. If nothing is done to combat this problem, the figure might reach 10 million people a year by 2050. Fighting this threat is a public health priority that requires a global collaborative approach across different sectors, including medicine, agriculture, and the veterinary sector.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared that AMR is one of the top 10 global public health threats facing humanity. The misuse and overuse of antimicrobials are considered the main drivers of the development and spread of drug-resistant pathogens. In addition, lack of clean water and effective infection control measures lead to the further enumeration of microorganisms that are potentially resistant to different antimicrobials. Moreover, the direct and indirect economic losses associated with AMR are significant.

We need to understand that without effective antimicrobials, the success of modern medicine varying from simple interventions (e.g., cesarean section) to complicated ones (major surgery, organ transplantations, etc.) is under increasing risk. Therefore, this Special Issue welcomes submissions related to different aspects of AMR, including epidemiology, surveillance, and analysis of consumption data. Submissions of effective interventions to combat AMR are especially welcome.

Prof. Dr. Roman Kozlov
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antibiotics
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • surveillance
  • epediomoly
  • consumption data

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Current Antimicrobial Stewardship Practice and Education in Russian Hospitals: Results of a Multicenter Survey
Antibiotics 2021, 10(8), 892; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10080892 - 22 Jul 2021
Viewed by 317
Abstract
Proper antibiotic usage education and training of medical students and healthcare professionals is the cornerstone to implement antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programs worldwide. We conducted this voluntary and anonymous survey on current and preferred educational provision of AMS in Russia. Among 1358 polled respondents [...] Read more.
Proper antibiotic usage education and training of medical students and healthcare professionals is the cornerstone to implement antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programs worldwide. We conducted this voluntary and anonymous survey on current and preferred educational provision of AMS in Russia. Among 1358 polled respondents from six participating Centers located in geographically remote Federal Districts of Russia, the majority were nurses (52.8%) and doctors (42.0%). Results of the survey demonstrated better coverage of education in AMS on an undergraduate level (57.1%). More than half of respondents in total (52.4%) stated they had not received any postgraduate training. Those 38.4% respondents who received postgraduate teaching in AMS stated that it had been provided substantially by an employing hospital (28.4%) or by a medical university/college (22.3%). According to the conducted survey, the methods of education in AMS in Russian Federation mainly include traditional face-to-face lectures, presentations and provision with clinical guidelines, recommendations and printed materials. The involvement of e-learning and web-based online approaches was lacking. The survey allowed us the identify the key problems associated with training of healthcare workers in this field, in particular the varying availability of under- and postgraduate education in different parts of Russia. Full article
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