Special Issue "New Biomolecules and Drug Delivery Systems as Alternatives to Conventional Antibiotics"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Novel Antimicrobial Agents".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

New approaches to deal with the growing concern associated with antibiotic-resistant bacteria are in great demand. For many years, antibiotics have been widely employed to treat infections. However, their excessive consumption and misuse have accelerated the rise of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms, which constitute one of the dominant challenges to global health. The antibiotic crisis is now a general concern and alternative biomolecules or drug delivery systems to treat infections are, therefore, urgently needed. From natural extracts to traditional medicine remedies, to newly engineered nanocapsules and nanoparticles to bio-based, biodegradable delivery platforms, many systems to fight infections have been proposed.

This Special Issue seeks manuscript submissions that further our understanding of the antimicrobial action of specialized biomolecules, recently engineered or chemically modified from their ancient origins, as alternatives to conventional antibiotics. Submissions on the response of microorganisms to these agents, their contribution to infection control, and prevention of serious conditions/illnesses from occurring or evolving, are especially encouraged. Publications that aim at a deeper understanding of the synergistic effects between different biomolecules and/or biomaterials (as delivery platforms) in infected wound care and establish their advantageous performance as a new step towards the resolution of the antibiotic crisis are also very welcome.

Dr. Helena P. Felgueiras
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial agents
  • Infection control
  • Baceria resistance
  • Natural extracts
  • Biomaterials functionalization
  • Biological delivery systems
  • Local and systemic drug administration
  • Antibiotics world crisis

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Bioactivity and Control Efficacy of the Novel Antibiotic Tetramycin against Various Kiwifruit Diseases
Antibiotics 2021, 10(3), 289; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10030289 - 10 Mar 2021
Viewed by 542
Abstract
Tetramycin, a novel polyene agriculture antibiotic, has excellent antimicrobial activity against many plant pathogens. In this study, the antimicrobial activities of tetramycin and conventional antibiotics on eight common pathogens and their field control efficacies against four serious diseases in kiwifruit were investigated. The [...] Read more.
Tetramycin, a novel polyene agriculture antibiotic, has excellent antimicrobial activity against many plant pathogens. In this study, the antimicrobial activities of tetramycin and conventional antibiotics on eight common pathogens and their field control efficacies against four serious diseases in kiwifruit were investigated. The results show that 0.3% tetramycin aqueous solutions (AS) exhibited the superior antibacterial and antifungal activity against Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae, Pseudomonas fulva, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Botryosphaeriadothidea, Phomopsis sp., Alternaria tenuissima, Armillariella mellea and Phytophthora cactorum of kiwifruit pathogens with EC50 values of 1.21, 1.24, 0.72, 0.14, 0.09, 0.16, 0.06 and 0.17 mg kg−1, respectively. These EC50 values of tetramycin were much higher than those of conventional kasugamycin, zhongshengmycin or polyoxin. Meanwhile, 0.3% tetramycin AS possessed the good field control efficacies for canker, soft rot, blossom blight and brown spot disease of kiwifruit with 74.45, 83.55, 84.74 and 89.62%. Moreover, 0.3% tetramycin AS application notably increased fruit resistance substances contents, activated fruit superoxide dismutase and polyphenoloxidase activities, as well as remarkably enhanced fruit growth, improved fruit quality and storability. This study highlights that tetramycin can be used as a preferred alternative to conventional antibiotics in kiwifruit production. Full article
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Article
Grapefruit Seed Extract as a Natural Derived Antibacterial Substance against Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria
Antibiotics 2021, 10(1), 85; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10010085 - 18 Jan 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1157
Abstract
Multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria are increasing due to the abuse and misuse of antibiotics, and nosocomial infections by MDR bacteria are also increasing. The aim of this study was to identify new substances that can target MDR bacteria among 12 plant extracts that are [...] Read more.
Multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria are increasing due to the abuse and misuse of antibiotics, and nosocomial infections by MDR bacteria are also increasing. The aim of this study was to identify new substances that can target MDR bacteria among 12 plant extracts that are known to have antibacterial effects. The experiments were performed by the disk diffusion test and microdilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) test, as described by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). By screening against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), grapefruit seed extract (GSE) was selected from 12 plant extracts for subsequent experiments. GSE showed antibacterial effects against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) in the disk diffusion test. Even at the lowest concentration, GSE showed antibacterial activity in the microdilution MIC test. As a result, we can conclude that GSE is a naturally derived antibacterial substance that exhibits a favorable antibacterial effect even at a very low concentration, so it is a good candidate for a natural substance that can be used to prevent or reduce nosocomial infections as coating for materials used in medical contexts or by mixing a small amount with other materials. Full article
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Article
Green Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles and Evaluation of Their Antibacterial Activity against Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria and Wound Healing Efficacy Using a Murine Model
Antibiotics 2020, 9(12), 902; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics9120902 - 13 Dec 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 892
Abstract
Green nanotechnology has significant applications in various biomedical science fields. In this study, green-synthesized silver nanoparticles, prepared by using Catharanthus roseus and Azadirachta indica extracts, were characterized using UV–Vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Silver [...] Read more.
Green nanotechnology has significant applications in various biomedical science fields. In this study, green-synthesized silver nanoparticles, prepared by using Catharanthus roseus and Azadirachta indica extracts, were characterized using UV–Vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) synthesized from leaf extracts of C. roseus and A. indica effectively inhibited the growth of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria isolated from patients with septic wound infections. The maximum bacteriolytic activity of the green-synthesized Ag NPs of C. roseus and A. indica against the MDR bacterium K. Pneumoniae was shown by a zone of inhibition of 19 and 16 mm, respectively. C. roseus Ag NPs exhibited more bacteriolytic activity than A. indica Ag NPs in terms of the zone of inhibition. Moreover, these particles were effective in healing wounds in BALB/c mice. Ag NPs of C. roseus and A. indica enhanced wound healing by 94% ± 1% and 87% ± 1%, respectively. Our data suggest that Ag NPs from C. roseus and A. indicia ameliorate excision wounds, and wound healing could be due to their effective antimicrobial activity against MDR bacteria. Hence, these Ag NPs could be potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of wounds. Full article
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Article
Poly-ε-caprolactone Nanoparticles Loaded with 4-Nerolidylcatechol (4-NC) for Growth Inhibition of Microsporum canis
Antibiotics 2020, 9(12), 894; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics9120894 - 11 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 481
Abstract
Dermatophyte fungal infections are difficult to treat because they need long-term treatments. 4-Nerolidylcatechol (4-NC) is a compound found in Piper umbellatum that has been reported to demonstrate significant antifungal activity, but is easily oxidizable. Due to this characteristic, the incorporation in nanostructured systems [...] Read more.
Dermatophyte fungal infections are difficult to treat because they need long-term treatments. 4-Nerolidylcatechol (4-NC) is a compound found in Piper umbellatum that has been reported to demonstrate significant antifungal activity, but is easily oxidizable. Due to this characteristic, the incorporation in nanostructured systems represents a strategy to guarantee the compound’s stability compared to the isolated form and the possibility of improving antifungal activity. The objective of this study was to incorporate 4-NC into polymeric nanoparticles to evaluate, in vitro and in vivo, the growth inhibition of Microsporum canis. 4-NC was isolated from fresh leaves of P. umbellatum, and polymer nanoparticles of polycaprolactone were developed by nanoprecipitation using a 1:5 weight ratio (drug:polymer). Nanoparticles exhibited excellent encapsulation efficiency, and the antifungal activity was observed in nanoparticles with 4-NC incorporated. Polymeric nanoparticles can be a strategy employed for decreased cytotoxicity, increasing the stability and solubility of substances, as well as improving the efficacy of 4-NC. Full article
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Review

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Review
Recent Advances in Fiber–Hydrogel Composites for Wound Healing and Drug Delivery Systems
Antibiotics 2021, 10(3), 248; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10030248 - 02 Mar 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 866
Abstract
In the last decades, much research has been done to fasten wound healing and target-direct drug delivery. Hydrogel-based scaffolds have been a recurrent solution in both cases, with some reaching already the market, even though their mechanical stability remains a challenge. To overcome [...] Read more.
In the last decades, much research has been done to fasten wound healing and target-direct drug delivery. Hydrogel-based scaffolds have been a recurrent solution in both cases, with some reaching already the market, even though their mechanical stability remains a challenge. To overcome this limitation, reinforcement of hydrogels with fibers has been explored. The structural resemblance of fiber–hydrogel composites to natural tissues has been a driving force for the optimization and exploration of these systems in biomedicine. Indeed, the combination of hydrogel-forming techniques and fiber spinning approaches has been crucial in the development of scaffolding systems with improved mechanical strength and medicinal properties. In this review, a comprehensive overview of the recently developed fiber–hydrogel composite strategies for wound healing and drug delivery is provided. The methodologies employed in fiber and hydrogel formation are also highlighted, together with the most compatible polymer combinations, as well as drug incorporation approaches creating stimuli-sensitive and triggered drug release towards an enhanced host response. Full article
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