Special Issue "Antibiotic Use in the Communities"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Antibiotics Use and Antimicrobial Stewardship".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Timo Juhani Lajunen
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway
Interests: antibiotic use in community, cultural differences, behavioural change, personality, attitudes, risk
Prof. Mark Sullman
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Social Sciences, University of Nicosia, Nicosia 2417, Cyprus
Interests: Public health, Applied Psychology, Traffic Psychology, Industrial & Organisational Psychology

Special Issue Information

Antimicrobial resistance has rapidly increased and become a major threat to global public health. Antimicrobial resistance is accelerated by the reckless use of antibiotics in health care by health care workers and the public as well as in agriculture. Hence, the reason for the increase in antimicrobial resistance is, to a large degree, behavioral. In addition to appropriate prescription and use of antibiotics, other behavioral measures to prevent infections, such as maintaining vaccines and hygiene, help to prevent antibiotic resistance.

This Special Issue, “Antibiotic Use in the Community”, focuses on behavioral aspects of antibiotic use and infection prevention in the community. Papers addressing the great variety of behavioral aspects in antibiotic use and infection control are welcome. These can include socioeconomic, cultural, educational, and psychological studies, and can be based on any research design from quantitative to qualitative studies and macro-level indicators.

We kindly invite original research articles as well as review papers. All articles will be peer reviewed. 

Prof. Timo Juhani Lajunen
Prof. Mark Sullman
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antibiotic use
  • community
  • behavior
  • socioeconomic factors
  • culture
  • values

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Antibiotic Prescribing Practices in Endodontic Infections: A Survey of Dentists in Serbia
Antibiotics 2021, 10(1), 67; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10010067 - 12 Jan 2021
Abstract
The study goal was to provide an overview of antibiotic prescribing practices of Serbian dentists when treating endodontic infections and to disseminate the current ESE (European Society of Endodontology) recommendations to the study participants. A link to an online questionnaire was sent to [...] Read more.
The study goal was to provide an overview of antibiotic prescribing practices of Serbian dentists when treating endodontic infections and to disseminate the current ESE (European Society of Endodontology) recommendations to the study participants. A link to an online questionnaire was sent to 628 Serbian dentists whose email addresses were publicly available on the Internet, 158 of whom responded to the survey, resulting in a 25.16% response rate. The significance of possible associations was assessed via the Chi-squared test and Cramer’s V measure of association, with p < 0.05 considered as statistically significant. According to the study findings, 55.7% of respondents prescribed a 5-day antibiotic course. Moreover, Amoxicillin 500 mg was the first-choice antibiotic for 55.1% of the respondents, followed by Clindamycin 600 mg (18.4%). For patients allergic to penicillin, 61.4% of respondents prescribed Clindamycin. Statistically significant differences emerged only in relation to acute apical abscess with systemic involvement, whereby dentists aged 46–55 were least likely to prescribe antibiotics in these clinical situations (p = 0.04). Analyses further revealed that recommendations for safe antibiotic prescribing practices were not always followed, as in certain cases, patients were given antibiotics even when this was not indicated. These findings highlight the need for additional education on responsible antibiotic use to prevent bacterial resistance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibiotic Use in the Communities)
Open AccessArticle
Is Early Oral Antimicrobial Switch Useful for Less Critically Ill Adults with Community-Onset Bacteraemia in Emergency Departments?
Antibiotics 2020, 9(11), 807; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics9110807 - 13 Nov 2020
Abstract
To compare prognoses and adverse events between bacteraemic patients in the emergency department (ED) who received an early antimicrobial IV-to-PO switch and those treated with late or no IV-to-PO switch, an 8-year multicentre cohort consisting of adults with community-onset bacteraemia was conducted. The [...] Read more.
To compare prognoses and adverse events between bacteraemic patients in the emergency department (ED) who received an early antimicrobial IV-to-PO switch and those treated with late or no IV-to-PO switch, an 8-year multicentre cohort consisting of adults with community-onset bacteraemia was conducted. The clinical characteristics and outcomes were compared in matched cohorts by the closest propensity score calculated based on the independent determinants of 30-day mortality identified by the multivariate regression model. Of the 6664 hospitalised patients who received no or late IV-to-PO switch, 2410 were appropriately matched with 482 patients treated with early IV-to-PO switch and discharged from the ED. There were no significant differences between the two matched groups in their baseline characteristics, including the patient demographics, severity and types of comorbidities, severity and sources of bacteraemia, and the 15- and 30-day mortality rates. Notably, in addition to the shorter lengths of intravenous antimicrobial administration and hospital stay, less phlebitis and lower antimicrobial costs were observed in patients who received an early IV-to-PO switch. Similarity was observed in the clinical failure rates between the two groups. Furthermore, the inappropriate administration of empirical antibiotics and inadequate source control were identified as the only independent determinants of the post-switch 30-day crude mortality in patients who received an early IV-to-PO switch. In conclusion, for less critically ill adults with community-onset bacteraemia who received appropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy and adequate source control, an early IV-to-PO switch might be safe and cost-effective after a short course of intravenous antimicrobial therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibiotic Use in the Communities)
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