Special Issue "Antibiotic Resistance: In the Perspective of Mechanism and Reverting"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Mechanism and Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Xuanxian Peng
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for Proteomics and Metabolomics, State Key Laboratory of Bio-Control, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, University City, Guangzhou 510006, China
Interests: functional metabolomics for antibiotic resistance

Special Issue Information

Dear Collogues,

The surge of antibiotic-resistant bacteria brings huge challenges to modern medicine, threatening human health and causing huge economic loss. Understanding the mechanism conferring antibiotic resistance is essential for developing strategies to overcome resistance. Tremendous progress has been made over past decades in deciphering the key determinants of antibiotic resistance. A comprehensive understanding of the action of antibiotics also sheds light on the traits of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, preventive and control measures are still lacking. It is noteworthy that many studies have focused on how, for example, certain genes, efflux pumps, and antibiotic modification enzymes contribute to the antibiotic response and how the inhibitors to counteract such effects have been designed. However, an important aspect that is always being ignored is how we can reverse antibiotic resistance or re-sensitize antibiotic-resistant bacteria to current available antibiotics based on the identified mechanism. With this consideration in mind, we have proposed a Special Issue that will specifically address the mechanism that can be harnessed to reverse antibiotic resistance. Besides classical studies on genes, efflux pumps, and antibiotic modification enzymes, we therefore encourage submissions from a broad perspective that enhance our understanding of the resistant mechanism and its use for reversing antibiotic resistance.

Prof. Xuanxian Peng
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Antibiotic resistance
  • Antibiotic resistance reverting
  • Antibiotic resistance mechanisms
  • Metabolomics
  • Proteomics
  • Metabolome-reprogramming

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Molecular Characterization of Cephalosporin and Fluoroquinolone Resistant Salmonella Choleraesuis Isolated from Patients with Systemic Salmonellosis in Thailand
Antibiotics 2021, 10(7), 844; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10070844 - 12 Jul 2021
Viewed by 334
Abstract
The antimicrobial resistance of nontyphoidal Salmonella has become a major clinical and public health problem. Southeast Asia has a high level of multidrug-resistant Salmonella and isolates resistant to both fluoroquinolone and third-generation cephalosporins. The incidence of co-resistance to both drug classes is a [...] Read more.
The antimicrobial resistance of nontyphoidal Salmonella has become a major clinical and public health problem. Southeast Asia has a high level of multidrug-resistant Salmonella and isolates resistant to both fluoroquinolone and third-generation cephalosporins. The incidence of co-resistance to both drug classes is a serious therapeutic problem in Thailand. The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance patterns, antimicrobial resistance genes and genotypic relatedness of third-generation cephalosporins and/or fluoroquinolone-resistant Salmonella Choleraesuis isolated from patients with systemic salmonellosis in Thailand. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the agar disk diffusion method, and ESBL production was detected by the combination disc method. A molecular evaluation of S. Choleraesuis isolates was performed using PCR and DNA sequencing. Then, a genotypic relatedness study of S. Choleraesuis was performed by pulse field gel electrophoresis. All 62 cefotaxime-resistant S. Choleraesuis isolates obtained from 61 clinical specimens were multidrug resistant. Forty-four isolates (44/62, 71.0%) were positive for ESBL phenotypes. Based on the PCR sequencing, 21, 1, 13, 23, 20 and 6 ESBL-producing isolates harboured the ESBL genes blaCTX-M-14, blaCTX-M-15, blaCTX-M-55, blaCMY-2, blaACC-1 and blaTEM-1, respectively. This study also found that nine (9/62, 14.5%) isolates exhibited co-resistance to ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime. All of the co-resistant isolates harboured at least one PMQR gene. The qnr genes and the aac(6′)-Ib-cr gene were the most prevalent genes detected. The QRDR mutation, including the gyrA (D87Y and D87G) and parC (T57S) genes, was also detected. PFGE patterns revealed a high degree of clonal diversity among the ESBL-producing isolates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibiotic Resistance: In the Perspective of Mechanism and Reverting)
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