Special Issue "Antibacterial Resistance and Novel Strategies to Eradicate Bacterial Biofilms"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Mechanism and Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Theerthankar Das
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, School of Medical Sciences, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW 2006, Australia
Interests: microbiology; microscopy/imaging; biochemistry; biomedical engineering; physical-chemistry; cell biology; bacterial biofilm biology and antibiotic resistance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bacterial resistance to existing and commonly used antibiotics, disinfectants, and detergents have raised a global alarm in regards to public health and economy. Bacteria which prefer to exist in biofilm state have greater resistance to antibacterial agents in comparison to those in planktonic state. Understanding the exact mechanisms by which bacteria develop resistance to antibacterial agents and the development of novel and innovative strategies to eradicate bacteria/biofilms and their associated infections are of the highest priority.

The Special Issue will primarily focus on antibacterial resistance mechanisms in bacteria and the development of new antibacterial agents targeting biofilm disruption. This Issue will consist of manuscripts, including original research articles, review articles, case series, and opinion papers. Specifically, work from the following fields of research will be included in this Issue:

Antibiotic resistance mechanisms in bacteria;

Antibiotic stewardship—use and misuse;

Bacterial virulence factors and their role in pathogenicity and infection;

Bacterial extracellular substances and their role in biofilm formation;

Host immunological response against bacteria;

Novel molecules targeting quorum-sensing inhibition in bacteria;

New antibacterial agents and their mode of action against bacterial biofilms;

Antibacterial coatings for biomedical applications;

Enzymatic degradation of bacterial biofilms;

Biofilm removal from the environment (e.g., water sources);

Food pathogens and control strategies.

Dr. Theerthankar Das
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
N-Acetylcysteine Protects Bladder Epithelial Cells from Bacterial Invasion and Displays Antibiofilm Activity against Urinary Tract Bacterial Pathogens
Antibiotics 2021, 10(8), 900; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10080900 - 23 Jul 2021
Viewed by 239
Abstract
Introduction: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) affect more than 150 million individuals annually. A strong correlation exists between bladder epithelia invasion by uropathogenic bacteria and patients with recurrent UTIs. Intracellular bacteria often recolonise epithelial cells post-antibiotic treatment. We investigated whether N-acetylcysteine (NAC) could prevent [...] Read more.
Introduction: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) affect more than 150 million individuals annually. A strong correlation exists between bladder epithelia invasion by uropathogenic bacteria and patients with recurrent UTIs. Intracellular bacteria often recolonise epithelial cells post-antibiotic treatment. We investigated whether N-acetylcysteine (NAC) could prevent uropathogenic E. coli and E. faecalis bladder cell invasion, in addition to its effect on uropathogens when used alone or in combination with ciprofloxacin. Methods: An invasion assay was performed in which bacteria were added to bladder epithelial cells (BECs) in presence of NAC and invasion was allowed to occur. Cells were washed with gentamicin, lysed, and plated for enumeration of the intracellular bacterial load. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by exposing BECs to various concentrations of NAC and quantifying the metabolic activity using resazurin at different exposure times. The effect of NAC on the preformed biofilms was also investigated by treating 48 h biofilms for 24 h and enumerating colony counts. Bacteria were stained with propidium iodide (PI) to measure membrane damage. Results: NAC completely inhibited BEC invasion by multiple E. coli and E. faecalis clinical strains in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.01). This was also evident when bacterial invasion was visualised using GFP-tagged E. coli. NAC displayed no cytotoxicity against BECs despite its intrinsic acidity (pH ~2.6), with >90% cellular viability 48 h post-exposure. NAC also prevented biofilm formation by E. coli and E. faecalis and significantly reduced bacterial loads in 48 h biofilms when combined with ciprofloxacin. NAC visibly damaged E. coli and E. faecalis bacterial membranes, with a threefold increase in propidium iodide-stained cells following treatment (p < 0.05). Conclusions: NAC is a non-toxic, antibiofilm agent in vitro and can prevent cell invasion and IBC formation by uropathogens, thus providing a potentially novel and efficacious treatment for UTIs. When combined with an antibiotic, it may disrupt bacterial biofilms and eliminate residual bacteria. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Novel Nitro-Heteroaromatic Antimicrobial Agents for the Control and Eradication of Biofilm-Forming Bacteria
Antibiotics 2021, 10(7), 855; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10070855 - 14 Jul 2021
Viewed by 371
Abstract
The synthesis and biological activity of several novel nitrothiazole, nitrobenzothiazole, and nitrofuran containing antimicrobial agents for the eradication of biofilm-forming Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens is described. Nitazoxanide (NTZ), nitrofurantoin, and furazolidone are commercial antimicrobials which were used as models to show how structural [...] Read more.
The synthesis and biological activity of several novel nitrothiazole, nitrobenzothiazole, and nitrofuran containing antimicrobial agents for the eradication of biofilm-forming Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens is described. Nitazoxanide (NTZ), nitrofurantoin, and furazolidone are commercial antimicrobials which were used as models to show how structural modification improved activity toward planktonic bacteria via minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays and biofilms via minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) assays. Structure–activity relationship (SAR) studies illustrate the ways in which improvements have been made to the aforementioned antimicrobial agents. It is of particular interest in this regard that the introduction of a chloro substituent at the 5-position of NTZ (analog 1b) resulted in marked activity enhancement, as did the replacement of the 2-acetoxy substituent in the latter compound with a basic amine group (analog 7b). It is also of importance that analog 4a, which is a simple methacrylamide, displayed noteworthy activity against S. epidermidis biofilms. These lead compounds identified to have high activity towards biofilms provide promise as starting points in future pro-drug studies. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Anti-Biofilm Molecules Targeting Functional Amyloids
Antibiotics 2021, 10(7), 795; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10070795 - 29 Jun 2021
Viewed by 370
Abstract
The choice of an effective therapeutic strategy in the treatment of biofilm-related infections is a significant issue. Amyloids, which have been historically related to human diseases, are now considered to be prevailing structural components of the biofilm matrix in a wide range of [...] Read more.
The choice of an effective therapeutic strategy in the treatment of biofilm-related infections is a significant issue. Amyloids, which have been historically related to human diseases, are now considered to be prevailing structural components of the biofilm matrix in a wide range of bacteria. This assumption creates the potential for an exciting research area, in which functional amyloids are considered to be attractive targets for drug development to dissemble biofilm structures. The present review describes the best-characterized bacterial functional amyloids and focuses on anti-biofilm agents that target intrinsic and facultative amyloids. This study provides a better understanding of the different modes of actions of the anti-amyloid molecules to inhibit biofilm formation. This information can be further exploited to improve the therapeutic strategies to combat biofilm-related infections. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop