Special Issue "Adaptive Evolution of Bacterial Pathogens in Response to Antibiotic Therapy"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 May 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. David Cameron
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Inselspital, University Hospital of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
Interests: Microevolution; Antibiotic tolerance; Antibiotic resistance; Persister cells; Pathogenesis; Phage therapy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bacterial pathogens have developed numerous methods to circumvent antibiotic therapy and cause long-term infections. In many instances, adaptations that occur during infection are pleiotropic and affect physiology, host-immune interactions, and pathogenesis.

Next-generation genome sequencing provides a technical platform to map and characterize adaptive mutations that are selected for during infection. The current Special Issue focuses on new mechanisms that alter treatment efficacy, immune responses, and/or bacterial virulence for the common nosocomial ‘ESKAPE’ pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter spp), as well as for less-typical pathogens that may infrequently cause long-term human disease.

Dr. David Robert Cameron
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Comparative genomics
  • functional genomics
  • microbial evolution
  • antibiotic resistance
  • pathogenesis

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessCommunication
The Resistance to Host Antimicrobial Peptides in Infections Caused by Daptomycin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Antibiotics 2021, 10(2), 96; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10020096 - 20 Jan 2021
Viewed by 484
Abstract
Daptomycin is an important antibiotic for the treatment of infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus. The emergence of daptomycin resistance in S. aureus is associated with treatment failure and persistent infections with poor clinical outcomes. Here, we investigated host innate immune responses against [...] Read more.
Daptomycin is an important antibiotic for the treatment of infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus. The emergence of daptomycin resistance in S. aureus is associated with treatment failure and persistent infections with poor clinical outcomes. Here, we investigated host innate immune responses against clinically derived, daptomycin-resistant (DAP-R) and -susceptible S. aureus paired isolates using a zebrafish infection model. We showed that the control of DAP-R S. aureus infections was attenuated in vivo due to cross-resistance to host cationic antimicrobial peptides. These data provide mechanistic understanding into persistent infections caused by DAP-R S. aureus and provide crucial insights into the adaptive evolution of this troublesome pathogen. Full article
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