Special Issue "Bacterial Metabolic Reprograming and Antibiotic Susceptibility during Infection"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Mechanism and Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Stephen Dolan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Hopkins Building, Downing Site, Cambridge CB2 1QW, UK
Interests: Pseudomonas; central carbon metabolism; biosynthesis; antibiotic targets; natural products; antibiotic resistance; antimicrobial development; host responses to bacterial infection
Dr. Michael Kohlstedt
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Systems Biotechnology, Saarland University, Campus A1 5, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany
Interests: Bacterial metabolism; central carbon metabolism; bacterial physiology; infection; antibiotics; biosynthesis; redox

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Many notable bacterial pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Mycobacterium tuberculosis  and Staphylococcus aureus display intrinsic resistance to many antibiotics or are known to rapidly acquire genetic mutations for further resistance, limiting treatment options.

Recent work has shown that antibiotic resistance in bacteria is regularly coupled with specific modifications in microbial metabolism. This metabolic reprogramming includes alterations in the electron transport chain, carbon flux and in the metabolism of amino acids, fatty acids or nucleotides. Indeed, the metabolic state of a bacterial population is known to be a strong determinant of antibiotic susceptibility. Understanding how the metabolic regulation of antibiotic susceptibility is orchestrated in bacteria may be the key to developing new antimicrobial strategies.

In this special issue, we will focus on the link between bacterial metabolism and antibiotic susceptibility during infection. Potential topics for primary research manuscripts and review articles include (but are not limited to) antimicrobials targeting core metabolic processes, mechanisms of antibiotic resistance, studies describing how bacterial metabolism responds to antibiotic exposure and how the host environment during infection constrains bacterial metabolism.

Dr. Stephen Dolan
Dr. Michael Kohlstedt
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Bacterial metabolism
  • central carbon metabolism
  • bacterial physiology
  • infection
  • antibiotics
  • biosynthesis
  • redox

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Post-Antibiotic Effect of Ampicillin and Levofloxacin to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus Based on Microscopic Imaging Analysis
Antibiotics 2020, 9(8), 458; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics9080458 - 29 Jul 2020
Viewed by 1406
Abstract
Post-antibiotic effect (PAE) is the continued suppression of bacterial growth following a limited exposure to an antimicrobial agent. The presence of PAE needs consequential consideration in designing antibiotic dosage regimens. To understand the behavior of bacteria, PAE provides information on how long antibiotics [...] Read more.
Post-antibiotic effect (PAE) is the continued suppression of bacterial growth following a limited exposure to an antimicrobial agent. The presence of PAE needs consequential consideration in designing antibiotic dosage regimens. To understand the behavior of bacteria, PAE provides information on how long antibiotics are applied to the bacteria. Conventional methods of measuring PAE depend on population detection and have limitations for understanding the individual behavior of bacteria. To observe the PAE, we utilized an imaging technique with the use of microscopy. Here, we discuss the microscopic image analysis system we used to study the PAE at a single-colony level. The size and number of colonies of bacteria were measured prior to and following antibiotic removal. We could count a single colony, see the development of the settlement prior to and following exposure of antibiotics and track the colony by microscopy according to the incubation time and the image processed by our own image processing program. The PAE of antibiotics was quantified by comparing bacteria size and number based on their exposure time. In our study, we discovered that the longer exposure of antibiotics causes the bacteria to be suppressed—even after washing the antibiotics from the solution. This finding suggests that microscopic imaging detection provides a new method for understanding PAE. In addition, the behavior of the cell in response to drugs and chemicals and their removal can be examined with the use of single colony analysis. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Acinetobacter baumannii Resistance: A Real Challenge for Clinicians
Antibiotics 2020, 9(4), 205; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics9040205 - 23 Apr 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2623
Abstract
Acinetobacter baumannii (named in honor of the American bacteriologists Paul and Linda Baumann) is a Gram-negative, multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogen that causes nosocomial infections, especially in intensive care units (ICUs) and immunocompromised patients with central venous catheters. A. baumannii has developed a broad spectrum [...] Read more.
Acinetobacter baumannii (named in honor of the American bacteriologists Paul and Linda Baumann) is a Gram-negative, multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogen that causes nosocomial infections, especially in intensive care units (ICUs) and immunocompromised patients with central venous catheters. A. baumannii has developed a broad spectrum of antimicrobial resistance, associated with a higher mortality rate among infected patients compared with other non-baumannii species. In terms of clinical impact, resistant strains are associated with increases in both in-hospital length of stay and mortality. A. baumannii can cause a variety of infections; most involve the respiratory tract, especially ventilator-associated pneumonia, but bacteremia and skin wound infections have also been reported, the latter of which has been prominently observed in the context of war-related trauma. Cases of meningitis associated with A. baumannii have been documented. The most common risk factor for the acquisition of MDR A baumannii is previous antibiotic use, following by mechanical ventilation, length of ICU/hospital stay, severity of illness, and use of medical devices. Current efforts focus on addressing all the antimicrobial resistance mechanisms described in A. baumannii, with the objective of identifying the most promising therapeutic scheme. Bacteriophage- and artilysin-based therapeutic approaches have been described as effective, but further research into their clinical use is required Full article
Back to TopTop