Special Issue "Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities of Natural Compounds and Synthetic Derivatives: Pharmacological Screening and Mechanism of Action"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Novel Antimicrobial Agents".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Elisabetta Buommino
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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy, University of Naples Federico II, 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: natural and synthetic compounds; antimicrobial and antimycotic properties; molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance; antibiofilm compounds; Malassezia and Candida spp; carbapemenase resistance; MRSA
Prof. Maria Rosaria Catania
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: bacterial and fungal mechanisms of persistence in the host; molecular epidemiology and characterization of antibiotic resistance determinants in bacteria of clinical interest; antibacterial and antifungal effects of unconventional antimicrobial agents
Prof. Dr. Marina DellaGreca
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo, 80126 Naples, Italy
Interests: isolation and structure elucidation of natural compounds from microorganisms and plants; synthesis and derivatization of natural products; chromatographic techniques; analytical and spectroscopic techniques
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Antimicrobial agents have represented a very powerful tool in the clinical management of infectious diseases since their first discovery in the early 20th century. However, the growing number of multi-drug resistant microorganisms has drastically reduced antibiotic efficacy, due also to their not always appropriate or excessive use. In the last few decades, only a few new antibiotics have been introduced, leading to depleted antibiotic reserves and, thus, reduced possibility to manage multi-resistant infections. This new scenario has forced worldwide research into the screening of new antimicrobials.

Oxidative stress occurs when there is an imbalance between free radical activity and antioxidant defence activity. When functioning properly, free radicals can help fight off pathogens, but if in excess they can contribute to the pathophysiology of several chronic diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. In recent years, it has been shown that some infections also cause oxidative stress.

Natural products from plants, fungi and bacteria have been successfully used in the past for their antimicrobial and antioxidant activity. Many bacteria or yeast metabolites have been used as starting chemical skeletons for the generation of semi-synthetic drugs with improved biological activity. However, the search for new compounds with antimicrobial and antioxidant properties remains an area still largely to be explored.

The goal of this Special Issue is the exploration of new compounds of natural origin, but also their analogues of synthesis, to develop new and urgently needed antimicrobial and antioxidant therapies.

Prof. Elisabetta Buommino
Prof. Maria Rosaria Catania
Prof. Marina DellaGreca
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • New natural antimicrobial compounds
  • Synthetic natural product derivatives
  • Antimicrobial effects (included anti biofilm activity)
  • Joint antimicrobial and antioxidant properties
  • Molecular mechanisms of novel compounds
  • Activity as disinfectants
  • Clinical applications
  • Multidrug resistant strains
  • Discovery of novel therapies to overcome known antimicrobial resistance mechanisms and/or to restore susceptibility to conventional antibiotics (synergistic effect)

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Synergistic Effect of Abietic Acid with Oxacillin against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius
Antibiotics 2021, 10(1), 80; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10010080 - 15 Jan 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 694
Abstract
Resin acids are valued in traditional medicine for their antiseptic properties. Among these, abietic acid has been reported to be active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. In veterinary healthcare, the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) strain is an important reservoir of antibiotic resistance [...] Read more.
Resin acids are valued in traditional medicine for their antiseptic properties. Among these, abietic acid has been reported to be active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. In veterinary healthcare, the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) strain is an important reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes including mecA. The incidence of MRSP has been increasing, and treatment options in veterinary medicine are partial. Here, we investigated the antimicrobial and antibiofilm properties of abietic acid against three MRSP and two methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MSSP) strains, isolated from diseased pet animals and human wound samples. Abietic acid showed a significant minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value ranging from 32 to 64 μg/mL (MRSPs) and 8 μg/mL (MSSP). By checkerboard method we demonstrated that abietic acid increased oxacillin susceptibility of MRSP strains, thus showing a synergistic interaction with oxacillin. Abietic acid was also able to contrast the vitality of treated MSSP and MRSP1 biofilms at 20 μg/mL and 40 μg/mL, respectively. Finally, the compound moderately reduced mecA, mecR1 and mec1 gene expression. In conclusion, the results here reported demonstrate the antimicrobial activity of abietic acid against MRSP and support the use of this compound as a potential therapeutic agent to be used in combinatorial antibiotic therapy. Full article
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Article
Novel Antimicrobial Peptide from Temporin L in The Treatment of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Malassezia pachydermatis in Polymicrobial Inter-Kingdom Infection
Antibiotics 2020, 9(9), 530; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics9090530 - 22 Aug 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 851
Abstract
Interkingdom polymicrobial diseases are caused by different microorganisms that colonize the same niche, as in the case of yeast-bacteria coinfections. The latter are difficult to treat due the absence of any common therapeutic target for their elimination, both in animals and humans. Staphylococcus [...] Read more.
Interkingdom polymicrobial diseases are caused by different microorganisms that colonize the same niche, as in the case of yeast-bacteria coinfections. The latter are difficult to treat due the absence of any common therapeutic target for their elimination, both in animals and humans. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Malassezia pachydermatis belong to distinct kingdoms. They can colonize the same skin district or apparatus being the causative agents of fastidious pet animals’ pathologies. Here we analysed the antimicrobial properties of a panel of 11 peptides, derived from temporin L, against Malassezia pachydermatis. Only peptide 8 showed the best mycocidal activity at 6.25 μM. Prolonged application of peptide 8 did not cause M. pachydermatis drug-resistance. Peptide 8 was also able to inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, regardless of methicillin resistance, at 1.56 μM for methicillin-susceptible S. pseudintermedius (MSSP) and 6.25 μM for methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP). Of interest, peptide 8 increased the susceptibility of MRSP to oxacillin. Oxacillin MIC value reduction was of about eight times when used in combination with peptide 8. Finally, the compound affected the vitality of bacteria embedded in S. pseudintermedius biofilm. In conclusion, peptide 8 might represent a valid therapeutic alternative in the treatment of interkingdom polymicrobial infections, also in the presence of methicillin-resistant bacteria. Full article
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