Special Issue "Development and Application of Plant Antimicrobial Substance"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant-Derived Antibiotics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Gianna Tempera
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical and Biotechnological Sciences, University of Catania, 95124 Catania CT, Italy
Interests: in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial activity of natural and synthetic substances; drug delivery; biofilm; urogynaecological infections
Dr. Carlo Genovese
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical and Biotechnological Sciences, Microbiology Section, University of Catania, 95124 Catania CT, Italy
Interests: in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial activity of natural and synthetic substances; drug delivery; biofilm; urogynaecological infections
Prof. Dr. Antonia Nostro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical, Biological, Pharmaceutical and Environmental Sciences, University of Messina, Messina, Italy
Interests: antimicrobials; biofilm; natural and conventional compounds; antimicrobial materials; antimicrobial delivery systems

Special Issue Information

From ancient times to today, we have known the therapeutic properties of plants, so much so that for a long period of time plants have been considered an important source of natural products able to maintain human well-being. Especially in the last decade, many studies of natural therapies have been published.

In particular, numerous studies have been published in the field of infectious diseases, which confirm the ability of plant extracts to inhibit in vitro the multiplication of many human pathogens. Many studies also describe the phytochemical analysis of biologically active substances and their mechanisms of action, but there are few studies related to their development and therapeutic applicability, probably because they possess an intrinsic power too low to be usable in clinical practice without the risk of harmful side effects.

We would therefore first of all like to focus this Special Issue on the possibility of increasing their antimicrobial activity by examples such as the following:

  • Technologies by which plant antimicrobials can be delivered (liposomes, nanoparticles, etc.)
  • Developing natural products as potential anti-biofilm agents
  • Plant Antimicrobial Peptides (Laboratory and clinical studies have determined that resistance to AMPs is less likely than resistance to conventional antibiotics. This is due to the way their membrane-targeting mechanisms of action find it more difficult to develop resistance to antibiotics, which generally target macromolecular synthesis (DNA, RNA, and protein).

In addition to applications in human therapy, it would be interesting to include studies on their application in the food industry, such as the development of antimicrobial food packaging systems.        These are just examples, but there may be other proposals, so manuscripts that cover other fields of application of substances extracted from plants are welcome.

Prof. Gianna Tempera
Dr. Carlo Genovese
Prof. Dr. Antonia Nostro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Plant extracts
  • Drug delivery
  • Biofilm inhibition
  • Plant Antimicrobial Peptides
  • Antimicrobial food packaging systems

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Phytochemical Profile and Microbiological Activity of Some Plants Belonging to the Fabaceae Family
Antibiotics 2021, 10(6), 662; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10060662 - 01 Jun 2021
Viewed by 707
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the chemical composition and the activity against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (ATCC 25923), Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes) (ATCC 19615), Escherichia coli (E. coli) (ATCC 25922), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) (ATCC 27853), Shigella flexneri (S. flexneri) (ATCC 12022), Salmonella [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate the chemical composition and the activity against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (ATCC 25923), Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes) (ATCC 19615), Escherichia coli (E. coli) (ATCC 25922), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) (ATCC 27853), Shigella flexneri (S. flexneri) (ATCC 12022), Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) (ATCC 14028), Haemophillus influenzae (H. influenza) type B (ATCC 10211) and two fungal strains: Candida albicans (C. albicans) (ATCC 10231) and Candida parapsilopsis (C. parapsilopsis) (ATCC 22019) of the extracts obtained from Melilotus officinalis (MO), Coronilla varia (CV); Ononis spinosa (OS) and Robinia pseudoacacia (RP) (Fabaceae), and to identify the chemical compounds responsible for the antimicrobial effect against the tested strains. The extracts were obtained by conventional hydroalcoholic extraction and analyzed in terms of total polyphenols using the spectrophotometric method and by liquid chromatography (LC). The results have shown that the highest polyphenols content was recorded in the RP sample (16.21 mg gallic acid equivalent GAE/g), followed by the CV (15.06 mg GAE/g), the OS (13.17 mg GAE/g), the lowest value being recorded for the MO sample (11.94 mg GAE/g). The antimicrobial testing of plant extracts was carried out using the microdilution method. The most sensitive strains identified were: E. coli, S. typhimurium, P. aeruginosa and S. pyogenes, while protocatechuic acid, gallic acid, caffeic acid, quercetin, rutin, and kaempferol were identified as the chemical compounds responsible for the antibacterial effect. The analysis of the correlation between the chemical composition and the antimicrobial effect proved a moderate (r > 0.5) positive correlation between rosmarinic acid and S. pyogenes (r = 0.526), rosmarinic acid and S. typhimurium (r = 0.568), quercetin and C. albicans (r = 0.553), quercetin and S. pyogenes (r = 0.605). Therefore, it suggested possible antimicrobial activity generated by these chemical components. The results recommend the Fabaceae plants as promising candidates for further research to develop novel natural antimicrobial drugs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Development and Application of Plant Antimicrobial Substance)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Rapid Screening of Essential Oils as Substances Which Enhance Antibiotic Activity Using a Modified Well Diffusion Method
Antibiotics 2021, 10(4), 463; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10040463 - 20 Apr 2021
Viewed by 564
Abstract
Antimicrobial resistance is recognized as one of the major global health challenges of the 21st century. Synergistic combinations for antimicrobial therapies can be a good strategy for the treatment of multidrug resistant infections. We examined the ability of a group of 29 plant [...] Read more.
Antimicrobial resistance is recognized as one of the major global health challenges of the 21st century. Synergistic combinations for antimicrobial therapies can be a good strategy for the treatment of multidrug resistant infections. We examined the ability of a group of 29 plant essential oils as substances which enhance the antibiotic activity. We used a modified well diffusion method to establish a high-throughput screening method for easy and rapid identification of high-level enhancement combinations against bacteria. We found that 25 essential oils possessed antibacterial activity against Escherichia Coli ATCC 25922 and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) 43300 with MICs that ranged from 0.01% to 2.5% v/v. We examined 319 (11 × 29) combinations in a checkerboard assay with E. Coli ATCC 25922 and MRSA 43300, and the result showed that high-level enhancement combinations were 48 and 44, low-level enhancement combinations were 214 and 211, and no effects combinations were 57 and 64, respectively. For further verification we randomly chose six combinations that included orange and Petitgrain essential oils in a standard time-killing assay. The results are in great agreement with those of the well diffusion assays. Therefore, the modified diffusion method was a rapid and effective method to screen high-level enhancement combinations of antibiotics and essential oils. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Development and Application of Plant Antimicrobial Substance)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
In Vitro Antibacterial, Anti-Adhesive and Anti-Biofilm Activities of Krameria lappacea (Dombey) Burdet & B.B. Simpson Root Extract against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains
Antibiotics 2021, 10(4), 428; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10040428 - 13 Apr 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 561 | Correction
Abstract
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) represents a serious threat to public health, due to its large variety of pathogenetic mechanisms. Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate the anti-MRSA activities of Krameria lappacea, a medicinal plant native to South America. Through Ultra-High-Performance Liquid [...] Read more.
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) represents a serious threat to public health, due to its large variety of pathogenetic mechanisms. Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate the anti-MRSA activities of Krameria lappacea, a medicinal plant native to South America. Through Ultra-High-Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled with High-Resolution Mass spectrometry, we analyzed the chemical composition of Krameria lappacea root extract (KLRE). The antibacterial activity of KLRE was determined by the broth microdilution method, also including the minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration and minimum biofilm eradication concentration. Besides, we evaluated the effect on adhesion and invasion of human lung carcinoma A549 cell line by MRSA strains. The obtained results revealed an interesting antimicrobial action of this extract, which efficiently inhibit the growth, biofilm formation, adhesion and invasion of MRSA strains. Furthermore, the chemical analysis revealed the presence in the extract of several flavonoid compounds and type-A and type-B proanthocyanidins, which are known for their anti-adhesive effects. Taken together, our findings showed an interesting antimicrobial activity of KLRE, giving an important contribution to the current knowledge on the biological activities of this plant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Development and Application of Plant Antimicrobial Substance)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, and Cytotoxic Activities of Juglans regia L. Pellicle Extract
Antibiotics 2021, 10(2), 159; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10020159 - 04 Feb 2021
Viewed by 889
Abstract
The difficulty to treat resistant strains-related hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) promoted the study of phytoextracts, known sources of bioactive molecules. Accordingly, in the present study, the pharmacological activities of Juglans regia (L.) pellicle extract (WPE) were investigated. The antiviral effect was tested against Herpes [...] Read more.
The difficulty to treat resistant strains-related hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) promoted the study of phytoextracts, known sources of bioactive molecules. Accordingly, in the present study, the pharmacological activities of Juglans regia (L.) pellicle extract (WPE) were investigated. The antiviral effect was tested against Herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2, Poliovirus 1, Adenovirus 2, Echovirus 9, Coxsackievirus B1 through the plaque reduction assay. The antibacterial and antifungal activities were evaluated against medically important strains, by the microdilution method. DPPH and superoxide dismutase (SOD)s-like activity assays were used to determine the antioxidant effect. Besides, the extract was screened for cytotoxicity on Caco-2, MCF-7, and HFF1 cell lines by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The total phenolic and flavonoid contents were also evaluated. Interestingly, WPE inhibited Herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) replication, bacterial and fungal growth. WPE showed free radical scavenging capacity and inhibited superoxide anion formation in a dose-dependent manner. These effects could be attributed to the high content of phenols and flavonoids, which were 0.377 ± 0.01 mg GE/g and 0.292 ± 0.08 mg CE/g, respectively. Moreover, WPE was able to reduce Caco-2 cell viability, at both 48 h and 72 h. The promising results encourage further studies aimed to better elucidate the role of WPE in the prevention of human infectious diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Development and Application of Plant Antimicrobial Substance)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop