Special Issue "Natural Products in Crop Protection, Post-harvest Disease Control and Food Contamination Management"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Marcello Iriti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Milan State University, Milan, Italy
Interests: environmental pollution; agrochemicals; mycotoxins; biomonitoring
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Directive 2009/128/EC establishes the sustainable use of pesticides by reducing the risks and impacts of pesticide use on human health and the environment and promoting the use of integrated pest management, and alternative approaches or techniques, such as nonchemical alternatives to pesticides. These measures are complementary to Regulation (EC) No 396/2005, which declares that a high level of consumer protection needs to be ensured, with provisions relating to maximum levels of pesticide residues in food and feed of plant and animal origin. Pesticide residues include active substances, metabolites, and/or breakdown or reaction products of active substances currently or formerly used in plant protection products. Accordingly, maximum residue level (MRL) refers to the upper legal level of a concentration for a pesticide residue in food or feed set by the Codex Alimentarius Commission and depending on good agricultural practice, and to the lowest consumer exposure necessary to protect vulnerable consumers. Of course, these issues are relevant worldwide, and not only in a European context, and every country adopts its own legislation. Mycotoxin contamination of food and feed represents a global threat for human and animal health because of their hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, genotoxicity and carcinogenicity in addition to being immunosuppressant agents and endocrine disruptors. Mycotoxins enter the food chain as a result of pre- and/or post-harvest fungal infections of crops and are typically found in cereals, dried fruits, nuts, spices, and some beverages such as wine, coffee, and beer. The most common mycotoxins that pose a risk to human and animal health include aflatoxins, ochratoxins, and Fusarium toxins (trichothecenes, fumonisins, and zearalenone), mainly produced by Aspergillus spp., Penicillium spp. and Fusarium spp. with the role of secondary metabolites.

In this very wide context, we invite investigators to submit both original research and review articles that explore all these aspects. Potential topics include but are not limited to innovative natural products potentially exploited in crop protection and control of post-harvest disease and food contaminations.

Prof. Dr. Marcello Iriti
Dr. Sara Vitalini
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biopesticides
  • Plant extracts
  • Bioactive phytochemicals
  • Marine organisms
  • Plant health
  • Food security
  • Food safety
  • Sustainable crop protection

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Allelopathic Interactions between Seeds of Portulaca oleracea L. and Crop Species
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(8), 3539; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app11083539 - 15 Apr 2021
Viewed by 418
Abstract
Allelopathy is described as the interference to plant growth resulting from chemical interactions among plants and other organisms mediated through the release of bioactive secondary metabolites. Since only a few studies have been reported about the role of seed allelopathy, an experiment was [...] Read more.
Allelopathy is described as the interference to plant growth resulting from chemical interactions among plants and other organisms mediated through the release of bioactive secondary metabolites. Since only a few studies have been reported about the role of seed allelopathy, an experiment was designed to evaluate the interactions among seeds of Portulaca oleracea L. and the crop species common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), onion (Allium cepa L.), sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.), broad bean (Vicia faba L.), and pea (Pisum sativum L.) on seed and seedling growth parameters. The results indicated that P. oleracea seeds had a negative effect on the germination of P. vulgaris and A. cepa. Conversely, germination of P. oleracea in the presence of P. vulgaris, A. cepa, and B. vulgaris seeds was strongly reduced with a higher inhibitory effect found for the seeds of A. cepa. The highest negative effect on root and shoot length was observed in P. vulgaris. Seedling vigor of all crop species decreased in the presence of P. oleracea. Our results suggest that seeds of P. vulgaris, A. cepa, and B. vulgaris exhibited high allelopathic effects against seeds of P. oleracea and can be used as potential bio-herbicides in future screening programs. Full article
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Review

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Review
Antimicorbial Potency of Major Functional Foods’ Essential Oils in Liquid and Vapor Phases: A Short Review
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(22), 8103; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app10228103 - 16 Nov 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 628
Abstract
Due to the increasing risk of chemical contaminations in the application of synthetic fungicides, the use of plant essential oils and extracts has recently been increased. In the present review, the antimicrobial potential of the most active plant-food essential oils in liquid and [...] Read more.
Due to the increasing risk of chemical contaminations in the application of synthetic fungicides, the use of plant essential oils and extracts has recently been increased. In the present review, the antimicrobial potential of the most active plant-food essential oils in liquid and vapor phases has been reviewed. The volatile isothiocyanates, aldehydes, and phenols, including allyl isothiocyanate, carvacrol, thymol, and eugenol, are considered to be the predominant components of essential oils, possessing significant antimicrobial activities. These components alone or in mixture can be effective. Overall, the antimicrobial activity of aroma compounds depends on the plant species, concentration, and method of application. This review provides useful information about the inhibitory application of the most common plant-foods’ essential oils in liquid and vapor phases against the growth of pathogenic microorganisms. Essential oils (EOs) are promising natural antimicrobial alternatives in food processing facilities. Although the food industry primarily uses spices and herbs to impart flavor, aroma, and pungency to foods, potent EOs represent interesting sources of natural products for food preservation. Full article
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