Special Issue "Applied Sciences in Oral Health and Clinical Dentistry"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Dentistry and Oral Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Zohaib Khurshid
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Dr. Sompop Bencharit
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Philips Institute for Oral Health Research, School of Dentistry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
Interests: digital dentistry; guided implant surgery; structural biology; protein structure; salivary biomarkers; salivary proteomics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Jithendra Ratnayake
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Oral Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Otago, Dunedin 9016, New Zealand
Interests: biomaterials; regenerative medicine
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Applied Sciences features high-impact articles on oral health and clinical dentistry. It covers all novel treatment strategies and oral health programs for the betterment of healthier lifestyles. Applied sciences in oral health and clinical dentistry cover broad principles and applications of material sciences towards developing novel drugs for therapeutic strategies in clinical dentistry that will improve oral health status. The main objective of this Special Issue is to publish novel research associated with new diagnostic and therapeutic methods in oral health and clinical dentistry, current and future challenges, the growing field of biomaterials, as well as new policies, education, protocols, and guidelines in oral health and clinical dentistry practice.

This Special Issue will cover the following keywords;

  • oral health education;
  • dental education;
  • special care dentistry;
  • COVID-19 surveys;
  • knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) analyses for oral health;
  • biomaterials;
  • bone cements;
  • dental composites;
  • CAD-CAM;
  • digital dentistry;
  • prosthodontics;
  • periodontology;
  • endodontics;
  • restorative dentistry;
  • orthodontics;
  • pedodontics;
  • infection control advancements;
  • antimicrobial drugs;
  • regenerative dentistry

Dr. Zohaib Khurshid
Prof. Dr. Muhammad Sohail Zafar
Dr. Sompop Bencharit
Dr. Jithendra Ratnayake
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Clinical versus Dental Laboratory Survey Regarding Modern Fixed Implant Supported Prosthetic in Romania
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(1), 472; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app12010472 - 04 Jan 2022
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Abstract
(1) Background: The success of prosthetic treatment with implant support depends on the combined effort of the team doctor-technician, each of them being responsible for the validation of execution stages. (2) Methods: we composed an online questionnaire with 18 multiple choice questions, using [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The success of prosthetic treatment with implant support depends on the combined effort of the team doctor-technician, each of them being responsible for the validation of execution stages. (2) Methods: we composed an online questionnaire with 18 multiple choice questions, using the Google Forms application. It was filled out by an equal number of prosthodontic specialists and dental technicians. Differences and associations were evaluated by Likelihood Ratio test, Linear by Linear association test, Kruskal-Wallis H test, Pearson Chi-Square test and the Fisher’s Exact test. (3) Results: Differences and similarities were found between the statements of prosthodontic specialists and dental technicians. Years of experience are correlated with the number of restorations, impression techniques and types of restoration (p ≤ 0.05). Similar answers for both groups were registered for preferred screw retained type of prosthetic abutment and most frequently reported complications. (4) Conclusions: The different perspectives of the two members of the prosthodontic team regarding the leading role in the treatment plan, type of abutment, impression technique and prosthetic design of implant fixed restorations has been revealed in our study. Similar education curricula and standards for continuing training courses after graduation are necessary for prosthodontic specialists and technicians in Romania. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Sciences in Oral Health and Clinical Dentistry)
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Article
Root Resorption of Adjacent Teeth Associated with Maxillary Canine Impaction in the Saudi Arabian Population: A Cross-Sectional Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Study
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(1), 334; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app12010334 - 30 Dec 2021
Viewed by 121
Abstract
This study aimed to identify the location of root resorption in relation to an impacted maxillary canine and grade its severity using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the Saudi Arabian population. Materials and Methods: CBCT scans of 169 patients with maxillary canine impaction [...] Read more.
This study aimed to identify the location of root resorption in relation to an impacted maxillary canine and grade its severity using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the Saudi Arabian population. Materials and Methods: CBCT scans of 169 patients with maxillary canine impaction were evaluated. The location and the severity of root resorption of the affected tooth in relation to the impacted maxillary canine were recorded for each patient. Results: a total 204 impacted maxillary canines caused root resorption in 218 adjacent teeth. Maximum root resorption was present in 63.3% of the apical one-third of the root and 37.6% of the palatal surfaces. There was mild root resorption in 55%, moderate in 10% and severe in 35%. There was no statistically significant difference between the gender, age, type of impaction, side of impaction, and the number, location, or degree of root resorption. Multiple logistic regression models showed significant association (p = 0.024) between gender, type of impaction, and root resorption. A significant correlation was found between the level and the surface of the root resorption (p = 0.018). Conclusion: In the Saudi population, apical one-third root levels and palatal surfaces were primarily involved in root resorption caused by impacted canines. The females with bilateral canine impaction were more likely affected by root resorption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Sciences in Oral Health and Clinical Dentistry)
Article
In Vivo Evaluation of Decellularized Human Tooth Scaffold for Dental Tissue Regeneration
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(18), 8472; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app11188472 - 13 Sep 2021
Viewed by 447
Abstract
Conventional root canal treatment may result in loss of tooth vitality, which can lead to unfavorable treatment outcomes. Notably, a ceased tooth development of immature permanent teeth with open apices, regeneration of periodontal ligaments (PDL), and pulp is highly expected healing process. For [...] Read more.
Conventional root canal treatment may result in loss of tooth vitality, which can lead to unfavorable treatment outcomes. Notably, a ceased tooth development of immature permanent teeth with open apices, regeneration of periodontal ligaments (PDL), and pulp is highly expected healing process. For regeneration, the scaffold is one of the critical components that carry biological benefits. Therefore, this study evaluated a decellularized human tooth as a scaffold for the PDL and pulp tissue regeneration. A tooth scaffold was fabricated using an effective decellularization method as reported in previous studies. PDL stem cells (PDLSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) obtained from human permanent teeth were inoculated onto decellularized scaffolds, then cultured to transplant into immunosuppressed mouse. After 9 weeks, PDLSCs and DPSCs that were inoculated onto decellularized tooth scaffolds and cultured in an in vivo demonstrated successful differentiation. In PDLSCs, a regeneration of the cementum/PDL complex could be expected. In DPSCs, the expression of genes related to revascularization and the hard tissue regeneration showed the possibility of pulp regeneration. This study suggested that the potential possible application of decellularized human tooth could be a scaffold in regeneration PDL and pulp tissue along with PDLSCs and DPSCs, respectively, as a novel treatment method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Sciences in Oral Health and Clinical Dentistry)
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Article
Doxycycline-Loaded Nitric Oxide-Releasing Nanomatrix Gel in Replanted Rat Molar on Pulp Regeneration
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(13), 6041; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app11136041 - 29 Jun 2021
Viewed by 441
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of doxycycline-loaded NO-releasing nanomatrix gel on pulp regeneration in replantation of avulsed rat teeth. A total of 28 maxillary first molars extracted from rats were replanted. The rats were divided into two [...] Read more.
The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of doxycycline-loaded NO-releasing nanomatrix gel on pulp regeneration in replantation of avulsed rat teeth. A total of 28 maxillary first molars extracted from rats were replanted. The rats were divided into two groups based on the use of root surface treatment: doxycycline-loaded NO-releasing nanomatrix group and no treatment. Eight weeks after replantation, the rats were sacrificed, and the teeth were evaluated using histomorphometric analysis. On histomorphometric analysis, the NO-releasing nanomatrix group demonstrated a significantly lower grade of pulp inflammation (1.00 ± 1.11, mean ± standard deviation) compared to the no treatment group (2.21 ± 1.25, p = 0.014). NO-releasing nanomatrix group showed a significantly higher grade of pulp regeneration (2.57 ± 0.85, p = 0.012) and significantly lower grade of pulp inflammation (1.00 ± 0.68, p = 0.025) compared to the no treatment group. In conclusion, NO-releasing nanomatrix gel improved pulp regeneration of replanted teeth, though the sample size of this study was rather small. Within the limits of this study, NO-releasing nanomatrix gel can provide more favorable pulpal regeneration despite replantation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Sciences in Oral Health and Clinical Dentistry)
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Article
In Vitro Characterization of Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells Derived from Supernumerary Teeth in Three-Dimensional Culture Method
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(13), 6040; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app11136040 - 29 Jun 2021
Viewed by 376
Abstract
Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the characteristics of periodontal ligament stem cells derived from supernumerary teeth (sPDLSCs), cultured using a three-dimensional (3D) method and a conventional two-dimensional (2D) method. Methods: The morphology, viability, and osteogenic differentiation of the cells [...] Read more.
Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the characteristics of periodontal ligament stem cells derived from supernumerary teeth (sPDLSCs), cultured using a three-dimensional (3D) method and a conventional two-dimensional (2D) method. Methods: The morphology, viability, and osteogenic differentiation of the cells were analyzed. In addition, gene expression was analyzed by RNA sequencing, to characterize the functional differences. Results: The diameter of the 3D-cultured sPDLSCs decreased over time, but the spheroid shape was maintained for 7 days. The osteogenic differentiation was similar in the 2D and 3D. The gene expression related to the extracellular matrix (7.3%), angiogenesis (5.6%), cell proliferation (4.6%), inflammatory response (3.7%), and cell migration (3.5%) differed (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, sPDLSCs varied in formation and function, depending on the culture method. In future, it is necessary to study tissue engineering using the advantages of 3D culture and the fewer ethical problems of supernumerary teeth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Sciences in Oral Health and Clinical Dentistry)
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