Special Issue "Applied Physiology and High-Performance Sport: Challenges, Solutions, and Future Directions"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 April 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Alan Ruddock
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Academy of Sport and Physical Activity, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S10 2BP, UK
Interests: sports science; exercise science; sport physiology; exercise performance; strength and conditioning; athletic performance; exercise testing; exercise physiology; resistance training
Prof. Dr. Matthew Driller
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Sport and Exercise Science, School of Allied Health, Human Services and Sport, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
Interests: sports science; exercise science; sport physiology; exercise performance; strength and conditioning; athletic performance; exercise testing; exercise physiology; resistance training
Dr. David Rogerson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Academy of Sport and Physical Activity, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S10 2BP, UK
Interests: sports science; exercise science; sport physiology; exercise performance; strength and conditioning; athletic performance; exercise testing; exercise physiology; resistance training
Dr. Lachlan James
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Sport and Exercise Science, School of Allied Health, Human Services and Sport, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
Interests: sports science; exercise science; sport physiology; exercise performance; strength and conditioning; athletic performance; exercise testing; exercise physiology; resistance training
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The physiology of sport and exercise is the study of how the body responds and adapts to exercise. Traditionally, scientific support programmes apply fundamental studies to change practice. In the last 20 years, our knowledge of high-performance sports physiology has improved considerably; however, practitioners still face challenges translating fundamental scientific concepts to applied practice, and vice versa, whereby applied practice influences basic research. Nevertheless, physiologists have solved specific challenges by creating novel frameworks, scientific methods, and innovative practices to enhance performance. This Special Issue aims to consolidate the knowledge, understanding, and experiences of applied physiologists working with high-performance athletes to form a platform for the next 20 years of applied physiological research and scientific support.

Therefore, the objectives of this Special Issue are to publish original research manuscripts and reviews that highlight challenges faced by applied physiologists in high-performance sport, propose solutions to specific physiological challenges in high-performance sport, and consider future directions to enhance the scientific support process from a physiological perspective.

Dr. Alan Ruddock
Prof. Dr. Matthew Driller
Dr. David Rogerson
Dr. Lachlan James
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sports science
  • elite athletes
  • physiological testing
  • scientific support
  • physiology of exercise
  • integration

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Global Position Analysis during Official Elite Female Beach Volleyball Competition: A Pilot Study
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(20), 9382; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app11209382 - 09 Oct 2021
Viewed by 225
Abstract
The aim of this study was to quantify the physical demands of female beach volleyball competition with reference to player position, set, and match outcome. Twelve professional players were equipped with a 10 Hz GPS device (Minimax S4, Catapult Sports, Australia). Data collection [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to quantify the physical demands of female beach volleyball competition with reference to player position, set, and match outcome. Twelve professional players were equipped with a 10 Hz GPS device (Minimax S4, Catapult Sports, Australia). Data collection occurred over 30 official matches, with a total of 50 sets. GPS output variables were related to position (e.g., Defenders and Blockers). Differences between players’ positions were found in Peak Player Load, the distance covered at different intensities, and acceleration and deceleration. Variations during the match were more pronounced for Defenders than for Blockers, with the former increasing the intensity of acceleration and deceleration, and decreasing the velocity of displacements and lower jumps. For Blockers, main variations occurred between the first and second set, with a reduction in velocity displacements and an increase in the intensity of jumps. Defender variables that contributed to victory were high deceleration, velocity, acceleration, and Peak Player Load. The characteristics of Blockers that contributed to victory were maximum velocity and high jumps. Female beach volleyball players seem to have different physiological requirements according to their position. The analysis of these variations throughout the game suggests that a specific player’s position output may be determined by proper and/or opponent tactical schemes. Full article

Review

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Review
The Wingate Anaerobic Test, a Narrative Review of the Protocol Variables That Affect the Results Obtained
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(16), 7417; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app11167417 - 12 Aug 2021
Viewed by 424
Abstract
The Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAT) has been widely used since its creation in 1974. The WAT involves performing a 30 s “all-out” cycling test. The test is currently applied with some modifications, partly due to the evolution of the material used to perform [...] Read more.
The Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAT) has been widely used since its creation in 1974. The WAT involves performing a 30 s “all-out” cycling test. The test is currently applied with some modifications, partly due to the evolution of the material used to perform it. The purpose of this text is to act as a guide for the correct use and application of the test, as well as to highlight the importance of controlling many of the variables that may influence its results. Methods: A literature search was conducted in PUBMED/MEDLINE and Web of Science with different combinations of keywords all related to the WAT to obtain a search of 113 papers. Results and discussion: It was observed that variables such as the duration of the test or the resistance used in the cycle ergometer must be adjusted according to the objective and the population evaluated, while others such as the warm-up or the supplementation of different substances can improve performance on the WAT. Conclusions: In order to apply the WAT correctly, variables such as duration, resistance used or warm-up time and intensity must be adjusted according to the evaluated subjects and the aim of the study. Other variables such as position on the bike or equipment used should also be controlled if we want to guarantee its replicability. Full article
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