Special Issue "Sustainable Environmental Restoration Technologies"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical and Molecular Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sabino De Gisi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil, Environmental, Land, Building Engineering and Chemistry, Polytechnic University of Bari, Via E. Orabona 4, 70125 Bari, Italy
Interests: environmental impact assessment; industrial and municipal wastewater treatment and reuse technologies; innovative materials for environmental applications; multidisciplinary approaches for complex problems; remediation of contaminated sites; thermal treatments; waste management
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Michele Notarnicola
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil, Environmental, Land, Building Engineering and Chemistry (DICATECh), Polytechnic University of Bari, Via E. Orabona n. 4, 70125 Bari, Italy
Interests: air monitoring; health and environmental risk analysis; innovative materials for environmental applications; remediation of contaminated sites; waste management; wastewater reuse
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Anthropogenic factors associated with industrial, urban, agricultural and recreational activities have increased the emission of many hazardous chemicals into the environment. Several decades of these emissions have led to the accumulation of pollutants in different environmental compartments such as soil, water and air. In particular, pollutants pose major concerns for human health and the environment, because these contaminants can migrate and become available to organisms, biota and humans. Among the new challenges there is the development of green and sustainable remediation approaches, able to create exciting interactions between engineers, chemists, biologists and ecologists. In particular, the management of contaminated sites presents a number of important challenges that span assessment, characterization, remedial action(s), and long-term monitoring to ensure the protection of the environment and human health.

This Special Issue is dedicated to discussing the new developments and challenges in remediation technologies for sustainable applications. The aim is to fill knowledge gaps and lead to the advancement of new knowledge on sustainable remediation technologies, by analysing different aspects such as:

  • Air pollution and treatment;
  • Emerging pollutants remediation;
  • Environmental pollution and remediation;
  • Environmental risk assessments;
  • Fate of contaminants in the environment;
  • Green technologies for remediation of contaminated sites;
  • Life cycle assessment (LCA) and environmental impact assessment (EIA);
  • Materials for remediation;
  • Planning aspects;
  • Pollution and health issues;
  • Reconversion of industrial areas;
  • Sediment pollution and treatment;
  • Social aspects of remediation;
  • Soil pollution and treatment;
  • Water pollution and treatment;
  • Toxicity of contaminants and remediation technologies.

Contributions to case studies of remediation actions, preferably with a multidisciplinary approach, are particularly welcome.

Dr. Sabino De Gisi
Prof. Dr. Michele Notarnicola
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Contaminants toxicity
  • environmental health risk assessment
  • green technologies
  • social management
  • total environment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Remediation of a Petroleum Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Site by Soil Vapor Extraction: A Full-Scale Case Study
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(12), 4261; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app10124261 - 22 Jun 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1434
Abstract
Spills, leaks, and other environmental aspects associated with petroleum products cause hazards to human health and ecosystems. Chemicals involved are total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), solvents, pesticides, and other heavy metals. Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is one of the main [...] Read more.
Spills, leaks, and other environmental aspects associated with petroleum products cause hazards to human health and ecosystems. Chemicals involved are total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), solvents, pesticides, and other heavy metals. Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is one of the main in-situ technologies currently employed for the remediation of groundwater and vadose zone contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The performance of an SVE remediation system was examined for a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated site with attention to remediation targets and final performance. The study assessed: (1) the efficiency of a full-scale remediation system and (2) the influence of parameters affecting the treatment system effectiveness. Results showed how VOC concentration in soil was highly reduced after four year treatment with a global effectiveness of 73%. Some soil samples did not reach the environmental threshold limits and, therefore, an extension of the remediation period was required. The soil texture, humidity, permeability, and the category of considered pollutants were found to influence the amount of total extracted VOCs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Environmental Restoration Technologies)
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Article
Washing Batch Test of Contaminated Sediment: The Case of Augusta Bay (SR, Italy)
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(2), 473; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app10020473 - 09 Jan 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 930
Abstract
Two experimental campaigns were conducted to optimize the applicability of the Sediment Washing treatment on the marine sediments of Augusta Bay contaminated with heavy metals and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). In the first campaign were used EDTA, citric acid, and acetic acid to [...] Read more.
Two experimental campaigns were conducted to optimize the applicability of the Sediment Washing treatment on the marine sediments of Augusta Bay contaminated with heavy metals and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). In the first campaign were used EDTA, citric acid, and acetic acid to removal only heavy metals (Ni, Cu, Zn, Cr, and Hg) from the sediments, while in the second campaign EDTA, citric acid, and EDDS were used to removal heavy metals (Ni, Cu, Cr, and Pb) and TPH. The tests were conducted at different pH values and contact times with 1:10 solid:liquid weight ratio. In the first experimental, at pH values 4, contact time 3 h, and citric acid, high removal efficiencies (78–82%) have been obtained for Ni, Cu, Zn, and Cr metals, while, in the second experimental campaign, at pH value 4, contact time 0.5 h, and citric acid, high removal efficiencies have been achieved especially for Pb and TPH. Finally, on the basis of the results obtained, a conceptual sediment washing treatment layout was proposed and the related costs estimated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Environmental Restoration Technologies)
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Article
An Integrated Approach Supporting Remediation of an Aquifer Contaminated with Chlorinated Solvents by a Combination of Adsorption and Biodegradation
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(20), 4318; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app9204318 - 14 Oct 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1071
Abstract
Hydrogeological uniqueness and chemical-physical peculiarities guide the contamination dynamics and decontamination mechanisms in the environmental arena. A single composite geodatabase, which integrates geological/hydrological, geophysical, and chemical data, acts as a “cockpit” in the definition of a conceptual model, design of a remediation strategy, [...] Read more.
Hydrogeological uniqueness and chemical-physical peculiarities guide the contamination dynamics and decontamination mechanisms in the environmental arena. A single composite geodatabase, which integrates geological/hydrological, geophysical, and chemical data, acts as a “cockpit” in the definition of a conceptual model, design of a remediation strategy, implementation, near-real-time monitoring, and validation/revision of a pilot test, and monitoring full-scale interventions. The selected remediation strategy involves the creation of "reactive" zones capable of reducing the concentration of chlorinated solvents in groundwater through the combined action of adsorption on micrometric activated carbon, which is injected into the aquifer, and degradation of organic contaminants, stimulating the dechlorinating biological activity by the addition of an electron donor. The technology is verified through a pilot test, to evaluate the possibility of scaling up the process. The results of post-treatment monitoring reveal abatement of the concentration of chlorinated solvents and intense biological dechlorination activity. Achieving the remediation objectives and project closure is based on the integration of multidisciplinary data using a multiscale approach. This research represents the first completed example in European territory of remediation of an aquifer contaminated with chlorinated solvents by a combination of adsorption and biodegradation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Environmental Restoration Technologies)
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Review

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Review
DPSIR Model Applied to the Remediation of Contaminated Sites. A Case Study: Mar Piccolo of Taranto
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(15), 5080; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app10155080 - 23 Jul 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1046
Abstract
The study critically analyses the complex situation of the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (South of Italy), considered one of the most polluted marine ecosystems in Europe. In order to investigate possible cause–effect relationships, useful to plan appropriate planning responses or remediation technologies to [...] Read more.
The study critically analyses the complex situation of the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (South of Italy), considered one of the most polluted marine ecosystems in Europe. In order to investigate possible cause–effect relationships, useful to plan appropriate planning responses or remediation technologies to be adopted, the Driver–Pressure–State–Impact–Response (DPSIR) model was applied. Methodologically, about 100 references have been considered, whose information was organized according to the logical scheme of the DPSIR. The results showed how the Mar Piccolo is the final receptor of pollutants coming from all industrial and agricultural activities, especially due to its natural hydrogeological network conformation. The anthropic activity represents a critical impact on the ecosystem due to the subsequent marine litter. The mobility of contaminants from sediments to the water column showed the potential risk related to the bioaccumulation of organisms from different trophic levels, posing a threat of unacceptable magnitude to human safety. The paper concludes by discussing the actions currently implemented by the authorities in response to the anthropogenic impacts as well as the need for new ones concerning both plans, programs, and remediation interventions. The case study shows how the DPSIR is a useful framework to organize extensive and heterogeneous information about a complex environmental system, such as the one investigated. This preliminary organization of the available data can represent the starting point for the development of a DPSIR-based Environmental Decision Support System (EDSS) with robust cause–effect relationships. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Environmental Restoration Technologies)
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