Special Issue "Promising Research and Strategies in Wastewater Treatment, Sludge Management and Valorization"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (21 January 2022).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Amanda Laca Pérez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Oviedo, C/ Julián Clavería s/n, 33071 Oviedo, Spain
Interests: biological treatment; wastewater treatment; LCA; fermentation processes; food wastes valorization, microplastics
Dr. Yolanda Patiño
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Oviedo, C/ Julián Clavería, s/n, 33071 Oviedo, Spain
Interests: emerging pollutants; adsorption process; electrochemical degradation; sludge valorization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rapid urbanization and industrialization, added to the presence of new pollutants, make it necessary to search for new wastewater treatment technologies that meet the high treatment capacity, as well as future water quality requirements.

Conventional WWTPs are designed primarily to remove organic matter and nutrients. For this reason, in same cases, these treatments are inefficient for the removal of some specific pollutants, with the consequent risk that this entails.  Furthermore, large amounts of sludge, derived from these processes, are produced every year, being considered the main residue from these plants. Their management requires important costs, both in economic and environmental terms, which makes it necessary to explore alternatives for their valorization. Waste reduction and reuse of wastewater seem to be an excellent option to meet the  concept of the circular economy in the wastewater treatment sector by reducing the environmental impacts. The topics of this Special Issue include but are not limited to the following:

  • Emerging pollutant removal by different technologies;
  • Microplastics as new emerging pollutants;
  • Novel technologies for wasterwater and sludge treatment;
  • Sludge valorization;
  • Wastewater reuse;
  • Environmental assessment of wastewater treatment.

Dr. Amanda Laca Pérez
Dr. Yolanda Patiño
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wastewater treatment
  • emerging pollutants
  • microplastics
  • sludge valorization
  • lifecycle assessment

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Biodegradation of Olive Mill Effluent by White-Rot Fungi
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(21), 9930; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app11219930 - 24 Oct 2021
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Abstract
The liquid fraction from the two-phase extraction process in the olive industry (alperujo), is a waste that contains lignocellulosic organic matter and phenolic compounds, difficult to treat by conventional biological methods. Lignocellulosic enzymes from white-rot fungi can be an interesting solution to break [...] Read more.
The liquid fraction from the two-phase extraction process in the olive industry (alperujo), is a waste that contains lignocellulosic organic matter and phenolic compounds, difficult to treat by conventional biological methods. Lignocellulosic enzymes from white-rot fungi can be an interesting solution to break down these recalcitrant compounds and advance the treatment of that waste. In the present work the ability of Phanerochaete chrysosporium to degrade the abovementioned liquid waste (AL) was studied. Experiments were carried out at 26 °C within the optimal pH range 4–6 for 10 days and with and without the addition of glucose, measuring the evolution of COD, BOD5, biodegradability index, reducing sugars, total phenolic compounds, and colour. The results obtained in this study revealed the interest of Phanerochaete chrysosporium for an economical and eco-friendly treatment of alperujo, achieving COD and colour removals around 60%, and 32% of total phenolic compounds degradation, regardless of glucose addition. Full article
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Article
Pharmaceutical and Antibiotic Pollutant Levels in Wastewater and the Waters of the Zarqa River, Jordan
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(18), 8638; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app11188638 - 17 Sep 2021
Viewed by 423
Abstract
Assamra wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) is the largest treatment facility in Jordan. Treated wastewater is discharged into the Zarqa River (ZR) and used to irrigate fodder and vegetables. ZR also includes surface runoff, stormwater, and raw wastewater illegally discharged into the river. This [...] Read more.
Assamra wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) is the largest treatment facility in Jordan. Treated wastewater is discharged into the Zarqa River (ZR) and used to irrigate fodder and vegetables. ZR also includes surface runoff, stormwater, and raw wastewater illegally discharged into the river. This study examined pharmaceutically active compounds (PhAC) in water resources in the ZR basin. Samples of WWTP influent and effluent and river water from four sites along ZR were collected. Concentrations of 18 target antibiotics, one stimulant, and 15 other PhACs were determined in the samples. Five antibiotics were detected in WWTP influent (510–860 ng L−1 for ∑Antibiotics) and six in the effluent (2300–2600 ng L−1 for ∑Antibiotics). Concentrations in the effluent of all antibiotics except clarithromycin increased by 2- to 5-fold compared with those in influent, while clarithromycin concentration decreased by around 4- fold (from 308 to 82 ng L−1). WWTP influent and effluent samples contained 14 non-antibiotic PhACs, one simulant, and six antibiotics at detectable concentrations. The dominant PhACs were paracetamol (74% of ∑PhACs) in the influent and carbamazepine (78% of ∑PhACs) in the effluent. At ZR sampling sites, carbamazepine was the dominant PhAC in all cases (800–2700 ng L−1). The antibiotics detected in WWTP effluent were also detected at the ZR sites. In summary, water in ZR is contaminated with PhACs, including antibiotics, and wastewater discharge seems to be the main pathway for this contamination. The occurrence of antibiotics and other PhACs in the irrigated soil requires investigation to assess their fate. Full article
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Review

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Review
Potential Use of Biochar in Pit Latrines as a Faecal Sludge Management Strategy to Reduce Water Resource Contaminations: A Review
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(24), 11772; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app112411772 - 13 Dec 2021
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Abstract
Faecal sludge management (FSM) in most developing countries is still insufficient. Sanitation challenges within the sub-Saharan region have led to recurring epidemics of water- and sanitation-related diseases. The use of pit latrines has been recognised as an option for on-site sanitation purposes. However, [...] Read more.
Faecal sludge management (FSM) in most developing countries is still insufficient. Sanitation challenges within the sub-Saharan region have led to recurring epidemics of water- and sanitation-related diseases. The use of pit latrines has been recognised as an option for on-site sanitation purposes. However, there is also concern that pit latrine leachates may cause harm to human and ecological health. Integrated approaches for improved access to water and sanitation through proper faecal sludge management are needed to address these issues. Biochar a carbon-rich adsorbent produced from any organic biomass when integrated with soil can potentially reduce contamination. The incorporation of biochar in FSM studies has numerous benefits in the control of prospective contaminants (i.e., heavy metals and inorganic and organic pollutants). This review paper evaluated the potential use of biochar in FSM. It was shown from the reviewed articles that biochar is a viable option for faecal sludge management because of its ability to bind contaminants. Challenges and possible sustainable ways to incorporate biochar in pit latrine sludge management were also illustrated. Biochar use as a low-cost adsorbent in wastewater contaminant mitigation can improve the quality of water resources. Biochar-amended sludge can also be repurposed as a useful economical by-product. Full article
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