Special Issue "Trends and Prospects in Environmental Geochemistry (Water, Soil, and Sediments)"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Gianluca Bianchini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy
Interests: environmental geochemistry; trace elements behavior; stable and radiogenic isotopes; water-air-rock interactions; weathering; soils and sediments; geo-biological reactions; natural and antropogenic anomalies; geo-resources and sustainable development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Claudio Natali
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
Interests: environmental geochemistry; trace elements behavior; stable and radiogenic isotopes; water-air-rock interactions; weathering; soils and sediments; geo-biological reactions; natural and antropogenic anomalies; geo-resources and sustainable development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Geochemical analyses of soils, sediment, and interacting water are important for understanding environmental systems and their evolution over the time.

They record both natural and anthropogenic factors, including fluxes of contaminants, and allow for the calculation of important geochemical budgets that measure interactions between the pedosphere–hydrosphere–atmosphere, as well as interactions with the biosphere.

New trends in geochemical investigations are currently facilitated by development of:

- portable instruments that allow for on-site analysis as an alternative to laboratory work;

- more performant elemental analysers that allow for lower detection limits;

- more performant mass spectrometers that allow for analysis investigations of a wide spectrum of isotopic tracers;

- remote-sensing geochemical prospection thanks to drone or satellite applications;

- geo-statistic applications that allow for the preparation of geochemical maps.

Despite the recent analytical developments, several types of data are still of difficult interpretation for the paucity of suitable geochemical archives, and have limited theoretical backgrounds.

Therefore, there is a need for studies that define geochemical backgrounds and anomalies in various frameworks.

Soil, sediment, and interacting water are essential georesources that provide nutrients for ecosystems and human populations, and thus have multiple applications. Therefore, soil, sediment and interacting water have to have sustainable approaches and be monitored carefully.

This Special Issue is open to a wide range of original research papers based on isotopic and elemental geochemistry, focused on geochemical processes occurring in the lithosphere, pedosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere that describe elemental occurrence, migration, and accumulation from different natural but also anthropogenic (e.g., agriculture and industry) sources. The aim is to publish articles dealing with innovative approaches and new perspectives, as well as practical applications, addressed at a broad geosciences audience. Publications dealing with interdisciplinary approaches are particularly welcome.

Dr. Gianluca Bianchini
Dr. Claudio Natali
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • geochemical backgrounds
  • geochemical anomalies
  • geochemical cycles
  • geogenic vs. anthropogenic sources
  • environmental monitoring
  • methodological developments
  • innovative approaches

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Exploring Methane Emission Drivers in Wetlands: The Cases of Massaciuccoli and Porta Lakes (Northern Tuscany, Italy)
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(24), 12156; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app112412156 - 20 Dec 2021
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Abstract
Wetlands are hotspots of CH4 emissions to the atmosphere, mainly sustained by microbial decomposition of organic matter in anoxic sediments. Several knowledge gaps exist on how environmental drivers shape CH4 emissions from these ecosystems, posing challenges in upscaling efforts to estimate [...] Read more.
Wetlands are hotspots of CH4 emissions to the atmosphere, mainly sustained by microbial decomposition of organic matter in anoxic sediments. Several knowledge gaps exist on how environmental drivers shape CH4 emissions from these ecosystems, posing challenges in upscaling efforts to estimate global emissions from waterbodies. In this work, CH4 and CO2 diffusive fluxes, along with chemical and isotopic composition of dissolved ionic and gaseous species, were determined from two wetlands of Tuscany (Italy): (i) Porta Lake, a small wetland largely invaded by Phragmites australis reeds experiencing reed die-back syndrome, and (ii) Massaciuccoli Lake, a wide marsh area including open-water basins and channels affected by seawater intrusion and eutrophication. Both wetlands were recognized as net sources of CH4 to the atmosphere. Our data show that the magnitude of CH4 diffusive emission was controlled by CH4 production and consumption rates, being mostly governed by (i) water temperature and availability of labile carbon substrates and (ii) water column depth, wind exposure and dissolved O2 contents, respectively. This evidence suggests that the highest CH4 diffusive fluxes were sustained by reed beds, providing a large availability of organic matter supporting acetoclastic methanogenesis, with relevant implications for global carbon budget and future climate models. Full article
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Article
Total and Leached Arsenic, Mercury and Antimony in the Mining Waste Dumping Area of Abbadia San Salvatore (Mt. Amiata, Central Italy)
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(17), 7893; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app11177893 - 26 Aug 2021
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Abstract
Total and leached Arsenic, Mercury and Antimony were determined in the topsoils developed on the mining waste dumping area of Le Lame (Mt. Amiata, central Italy) where the post-processing Hg-rich ore deposits from the mining area of Abbadia San Salvatore were stored. The [...] Read more.
Total and leached Arsenic, Mercury and Antimony were determined in the topsoils developed on the mining waste dumping area of Le Lame (Mt. Amiata, central Italy) where the post-processing Hg-rich ore deposits from the mining area of Abbadia San Salvatore were stored. The concentrations of As, Hg and Sb were up to 610, 1910 and 1610 mg kg−1, respectively, while those in the leachates (carried out with CO2-saturated MilliQ water to simulate the meteoric water conditions) were up to 102, 7 and 661 μg·L−1, respectively. Most aqueous solutions were characterized by Hg content <0.1 μg·L−1. This is likely suggesting that the mine wastes (locally named “rosticci”) were possibly resulting from an efficient roasting process that favored either the removal or inertization of Hg operated by the Gould furnaces and located in the southern sector of Le Lame. The highest values of total and leachate mercury were indeed mostly found in the northern portion where the “rosticci”, derived by the less efficient and older Spirek-Cermak furnaces, was accumulated. The saturation index was positive for the great majority of leachate samples in Fe-oxy-hydroxides, e.g., ferrihydrite, hematite, magnetite, goethite, and Al-hydroxides (boehmite and gibbsite). On the other hand, As- and Hg-compounds were shown to be systematically undersaturated, whereas oversaturation in tripuhyte (FeSbO4) and romeite (Ca2Sb2O7) was evidenced. The Eh-pH diagrams for the three chalcophile elements were also constructed and computed and updated according to the recent literature data. Full article
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