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Special Issue "Voltage Stability"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Tomonobu Senjyu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan
Interests: high-efficiency energy conversion system; renewable energy in small islands; optimization of power system operation and control
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Guest Editor is inviting submissions for a Special Issue of Applied Sciences on the subject area of “Voltage Stability”. Voltage stability is one of the most fundamental criteria for stable operation of power systems. The transmission system and distribution system deal with voltage stability and voltage control. In recent years, there have been many distributed generators in power systems, and, therefore, voltage stability is very complicated for large power systems. The voltage stability is largely related to voltage control in short-term, mid-term, and long-term. There are many voltage stability criterions; however, we need more accurate and comprehensive voltage stability criterions. Moreover, voltage control using power electronics equipment using optimal control is another interesting research topic in this Special Issue.

Prof. Tomonobu Senjyu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • steady state voltage stability
  • mid-term voltage stability
  • long-term voltage stability
  • short-term voltage stability
  • transient voltage stability
  • transmission line voltage control
  • distribution line voltage control
  • power supply reliability
  • renewable energy
  • optimal voltage control
  • energy storage system
  • power electronics for voltage stability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
A Contemporary Novel Classification of Voltage Stability Indices
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(5), 1639; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app10051639 - 29 Feb 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 775
Abstract
Within the framework of this study, the inductive analysis of voltage stability indices’ theoretical formulation, functionality, and overall performances are introduced. The prominence is given to investigate and compare the original indices from three main dimensions (formulation, assessment, and application) standpoints, which have [...] Read more.
Within the framework of this study, the inductive analysis of voltage stability indices’ theoretical formulation, functionality, and overall performances are introduced. The prominence is given to investigate and compare the original indices from three main dimensions (formulation, assessment, and application) standpoints, which have been frequently used and recently attracted. The generalizability of an exhaustive investigation on comparison of voltage stability indices seems problematic due to the multiplicity of the indices, and more importantly, their variety in theoretical foundation and performances. This study purports the first-ever framework for voltage stability indices classification for power system analysis. The test results found that indices in the same category are coherent to their theoretical foundation. The paper highlights the fact that each category of the indices is functional for a particular application irrespective of the drawback ranking, and negated the application of the Jacobian matrix-based indices for online application. Finally, the research efforts put forward a novel classification of voltage stability indices within the main three aspects of formulation, assessment, and behavior analysis in a synergistic manner as an exhaustive reference for students, researchers, scholars, and practitioners related to voltage stability analysis. The simulation tools used were MATLAB® and PowerWorld®. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Voltage Stability)
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Article
A Real Distribution Network Voltage Regulation Incorporating Auto-Tap-Changer Pole Transformer Multiobjective Optimization
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(14), 2813; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app9142813 - 14 Jul 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 976
Abstract
A number of studies realized operation of power systems are unstable in developing countries due to misconfiguration of distribution systems, limited power transfer capability, inconsistency of renewable resources integration, paucity of control and protection measures, timeworn technologies, and disproportionately topology. This study underlines [...] Read more.
A number of studies realized operation of power systems are unstable in developing countries due to misconfiguration of distribution systems, limited power transfer capability, inconsistency of renewable resources integration, paucity of control and protection measures, timeworn technologies, and disproportionately topology. This study underlines an Afghanistan case study with 40% power losses that is mainly pertinent from old distribution systems. The long length of distribution systems, low-power transfer capability, insufficient control and protection strategy, peak-demand elimination, and unstable operation (low energy quality and excessive voltage deviations) are perceived pre-eminent challenges of Afghanistan distribution systems. Some attainable solutions that fit challenges are remodeling (network reduction), networks reinforcement, optimum compensation strategy, reconfiguration options, improving, and transfer capability. This paper attempts to propose a viable solution using multiobjective optimization method of auto-tap-changer pole transformer (ATCTr). The proposed methodology in terms of optimal numbers and placement of ATCTr can be known as a novel two-dimensional solution. For this purpose, a real case of Kabul City distribution system is evaluated. Simulation results indicate the effectiveness of the proposed method in reducing system losses and improving system overall performance. This approach tends to regulate the voltage deviation in a proper and statutory range with minimum number and optimum placement of ATCTrs. The proposed method is simulated using MATLAB® environment to compare and evaluate performance of the proposed network under different situations and scenarios. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Voltage Stability)
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