Special Issue "Collective Atomic and Free-Electron Lasing"

A special issue of Atoms (ISSN 2218-2004).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. N. Piovella
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20133 Milano Italy
Interests: Collective effects; Atomic Physics; Quantum Optics; Opto-mechanical effects in cold atoms; Laser Physics
Dr. Gordon Robb
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G4 0LN, UK
Interests: BECs and Cold Atoms; Light-Matter Interactions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Collective or cooperative behaviors and interactions are abundant in nature. In physics, collective interactions mediated by light are of importance both for fundamental studies of phenomena such as spontaneous self-organization in classical and quantum systems as well as for their technological application. Recent examples of ground-breaking applications include new laser sources with extraordinary spectral capabilities, e.g., coherent X-ray generation by electron beams in free-electron lasers (FELs) and ultranarrow linewidth optical radiation generation by atoms in superradiant lasers. We invite contributions to this Special Issue on any topic relating to collective effects involving the interaction between light and matter, including, but not limited to:

  • Collective atomic recoil lasing1/collective Rayleigh scattering2
  • Free-electron lasing3
  • Cooperative emission or scattering of light4
  • Superradiant and subradiant emission or scattering of light5
  • Spontaneous self-organization mediated by light

This Special Issue is dedicated to the memory of Rodolfo Bonifacio, who was a pioneer in this field. A section of the Special Issue will be dedicated to contributions from the ESRs of the European Training Network “ColOpt” Collective effects and opto-mechanics in ultra-cold matter (H2020-MSCA-ITN-2016).

Dr. N. Piovella
Dr. Gordon Robb
Guest Editors

References

  1. Bonifacio and L. De Salvo Souza, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 341, 360 (1994).
  2. Inouye, A. P. Chikkatur, D. M. Stamper-Kurn, J. Stenger, D.E. Pritchard, and W. Ketterle, Science 285, 571 (1999).
  3. Bonifacio, C. Pellegrini, and L. M. Narducci, Opt. Commun. 50, 373 (1984).
  4. O. Scully, E.S. Fry, C.H.R. Ooi, K. Wodkiewicz, Phys.Rev. Lett. 96, 010501 (2006)
  5. H. Dicke, Phys. Rev. 93, 99 (1954)

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atoms is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • collective emissions in atomic systems
  • free-electron laser
  • superradiance
  • cooperative light scattering

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Few-Cycle Infrared Pulse Evolving in FEL Oscillators and Its Application to High-Harmonic Generation for Attosecond Ultraviolet and X-ray Pulses
Atoms 2021, 9(1), 15; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/atoms9010015 - 24 Feb 2021
Viewed by 452
Abstract
Generation of few-cycle optical pulses in free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators has been experimentally demonstrated in FEL facilities based on normal-conducting and superconducting linear accelerators. Analytical and numerical studies have revealed that the few-cycle FEL lasing can be explained in the frame of superradiance, [...] Read more.
Generation of few-cycle optical pulses in free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators has been experimentally demonstrated in FEL facilities based on normal-conducting and superconducting linear accelerators. Analytical and numerical studies have revealed that the few-cycle FEL lasing can be explained in the frame of superradiance, cooperative emission from self-bunched systems. In the present paper, we review historical remarks of superradiance FEL experiments in short-pulse FEL oscillators with emphasis on the few-cycle pulse generation and discuss the application of the few-cycle FEL pulses to the scheme of FEL-HHG, utilization of infrared FEL pulses to drive high-harmonic generation (HHG) from gas and solid targets. The FEL-HHG enables one to explore ultrafast science with attosecond ultraviolet and X-ray pulses with a MHz repetition rate, which is difficult with HHG driven by solid-state lasers. A research program has been launched to develop technologies for the FEL-HHG and to conduct a proof-of-concept experiment of FEL-HHG. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collective Atomic and Free-Electron Lasing)
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Open AccessArticle
“Amplified Spontaneous Emission” in Micro- and Nanolasers
Atoms 2021, 9(1), 6; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/atoms9010006 - 19 Jan 2021
Viewed by 473
Abstract
Amplified Spontaneous Emission is ubiquitous in systems with optical gain and is responsible for many opportunities and shortcomings. Its role in the progression from the simplest form of thermal radiation (single emitter spontaneous emission) all the way to coherent radiation from inverted systems [...] Read more.
Amplified Spontaneous Emission is ubiquitous in systems with optical gain and is responsible for many opportunities and shortcomings. Its role in the progression from the simplest form of thermal radiation (single emitter spontaneous emission) all the way to coherent radiation from inverted systems is still an open question. We critically review observations of photon bursts in micro- and nanolasers, in the perspective of currently used measurement techniques, in relation to threshold-related questions for small devices. Corresponding stochastic predictions are analyzed, and contrasted with burst absence in differential models, in light of general phase space properties. A brief discussion on perspectives is offered in the conclusions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collective Atomic and Free-Electron Lasing)
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Open AccessArticle
Multimode Collective Atomic Recoil Lasing in Free Space
Atoms 2020, 8(4), 93; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/atoms8040093 - 10 Dec 2020
Viewed by 631
Abstract
Cold atomic clouds in collective atomic recoil lasing are usually confined by an optical cavity, which forces the light-scattering to befall in the mode fixed by the resonator. Here we consider the system to be in free space, which leads into a vacuum [...] Read more.
Cold atomic clouds in collective atomic recoil lasing are usually confined by an optical cavity, which forces the light-scattering to befall in the mode fixed by the resonator. Here we consider the system to be in free space, which leads into a vacuum multimode collective scattering. We show that the presence of an optical cavity is not always necessary to achieve coherent collective emission by the atomic ensemble and that a preferred scattering path arises along the major axis of the atomic cloud. We derive a full vectorial model for multimode collective atomic recoil lasing in free space. Such a model consists of multi-particle equations capable of describing the motion of each atom in a 2D/3D cloud. These equations are numerically solved by means of molecular dynamic algorithms, usually employed in other scientific fields. The numerical results show that both atomic density and collective scattering patterns are applicable to the cloud’s orientation and shape and to the polarization of the incident light. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collective Atomic and Free-Electron Lasing)
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Open AccessArticle
Wave-Kinetic Approach to Collective Atomic Emission
Atoms 2020, 8(3), 42; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/atoms8030042 - 10 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 649
Abstract
We study the collective scattering of radiation by a large ensemble of Na1 atoms, in the presence of a pump field. We use the wave-kinetic approach where the center-of-mass position of the moving atoms is described by a microscopic discrete [...] Read more.
We study the collective scattering of radiation by a large ensemble of Na1 atoms, in the presence of a pump field. We use the wave-kinetic approach where the center-of-mass position of the moving atoms is described by a microscopic discrete distribution, or alternatively, by a Wigner distribution. This approach can include thermal effects and quantum recoil in a natural way, and even consider atomic ensembles out of equilibrium. We assume two-level atoms with atomic transition frequency ωa very different from the frequency ω0 of the pump field. We consider both the quasi-classical and quantum descriptions of the center-of-mass motion. In both cases, we establish the unstable regimes where coherent emission of radiation can take place. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collective Atomic and Free-Electron Lasing)
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