Special Issue "Healthy Even through Cancer—What Are the Assumptions and Outcomes for Psychological Intervention"

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Psychology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Eleonora Pinto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Esophageal and Digestive Tract Surgical Unit, Regional Centre for Esophageal Disease, Veneto Institute of Oncology (IOV-IRCCS), Padova, Italy
Interests: health; quality of life; oncological surgery; digestive tract neoplasms; research methodology; epistemology; narration

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cancer remains a highly fatal disease, a major cause of mortality, and a huge burden throughout the world, requiring increased primary prevention efforts, screenings, and treatments. When considering neoplasm disease, the side effects of treatments and iatrogenesis should also be taken into account in order to estimate the health of patients on a global scale.

In this sense, in current literature, quality of life has become one of the outcomes evaluated in oncological patients, and it is a self-reported outcome. This is a benchmark of the increasing need to “be healthy”, through experiencing the disease—before the achievement of oncological treatment goals or despite their failure. Therefore, health professionals should construct a treatment pathway for patients’ health, through the neoplasm. Research helps clinicians, in particular, by considering psychological perspectives, thus corroborating knowledge on cancer patient health.

We are pleased to invite you to contribute to this field.

This Special Issue aims to provide a picture of the state-of-art of psychological support in oncology. What are the objectives of psychological support? And what are the outcomes? What are psychological interventions specific for cancer patients based on? How are these psychological interventions carried out? Furthermore, what are the theoretical assumptions valid for psychological intervention in oncology? Moreover, where does the psychological intervention take place? Are caregivers considered? Are health professionals considered? When should these roles be considered and how? Last, but not least, how is psychological support evaluated in oncology?

These are some (of the many) questions, whose answers can suggest a direction towards the effective integration of psychological intervention in cancer patient care.

Thus, the collection of convergent contributions on the Special Issue, titled “Healthy Even through Cancer—What are the Assumptions and Outcomes for Psychological Intervention?”, may give rise to the identification of the first outlines for the identification of shared guidelines in the management of cancer patients.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome, as well as theoretical contributions that broaden the knowledge on this topic.

I look forward to receiving your contributions. 

Dr. Eleonora Pinto
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Behavioral Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • effectiveness
  • health
  • neoplasm
  • outcomes
  • psychological intervention
  • psychological techniques
  • quality of life

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Experiences of Female Breast Cancer Survivors Concerning Their Return to Work in Spain
Behav. Sci. 2021, 11(10), 135; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bs11100135 - 02 Oct 2021
Viewed by 323
Abstract
The objective of this study was to analyze the experiences of returning to work of women who had overcome breast cancer, identifying its physical and psychological consequences, the process they underwent, their motivations, and difficulties. A total of 19 female breast cancer survivors, [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to analyze the experiences of returning to work of women who had overcome breast cancer, identifying its physical and psychological consequences, the process they underwent, their motivations, and difficulties. A total of 19 female breast cancer survivors, with an age range of 30 to 57 years, participated in two focus groups. A semi-structured script was prepared about their experiences of returning to work. The results indicated that survivors’ self-perception was weakened by the physical and psychological consequences of the treatment of the disease; economic difficulties were one of the main reasons for going back to work; lastly, returning to work was a difficult process, mainly because of their physical/psychological limitations, the scarcity of job adaptation measures, and the limited support of the various public administrations. In addition, most of the women had to cope with seeking a new job without any guidance or job training. Significant difficulties related to the maintenance and return to work of female breast cancer survivors have been revealed. Findings highlighted the need to provide more and better information and guidance to cancer patients concerning their return to work or the search for a new job. Full article

Review

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Review
How to Intervene in the Health Management of the Oncological Patient and of Their Caregiver? A Narrative Review in the Psycho-Oncology Field
Behav. Sci. 2021, 11(7), 99; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bs11070099 - 09 Jul 2021
Viewed by 670
Abstract
Starting from statistical data derived from the oncological field, some articles have highlighted the importance of communication in the patient–caregiver dyad and have considered the various roles involved in a cancer diagnosis situation. Thus, the question of how to intervene in terms of [...] Read more.
Starting from statistical data derived from the oncological field, some articles have highlighted the importance of communication in the patient–caregiver dyad and have considered the various roles involved in a cancer diagnosis situation. Thus, the question of how to intervene in terms of “quality of life” from the time of diagnosis to the recovery or death of a cancer patient, beyond the sanitary and physical dimensions, has become relevant. Therefore, the present narrative review aims to offer an overview of the state of the art in terms of the psychological treatment modalities of cancer patients, from the diagnosis to the post-surgery period. A total of 67 articles were collected and analyzed, in relation to (1) psychological constructs employed in the oncological field, (2) intervention models and (3) quality of life and well-being measurement and evaluation tools. We described these articles, differentiating between those focusing on the role of (1) the patient, (2) the caregiver, (3) the patient–caregiver dyad and (4) healthcare professional roles. The oncological diagnosis and its repercussions in the lives of the patient and caregiver were explored and critical aspects that emerged from the literature were highlighted. In conclusion, the analysis allowed some considerations about the need to define research protocols and useful management strategies for increasing the overall health of patients with cancer diagnoses and the people who surround them. Full article
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