Special Issue "Road Crash Injury and Driver Behavior"

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Andrew Morris
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Transport Safety Research Centre, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK
Interests: traffic safety; crash-injury prevention; driver behavior; human factors in transport safety

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

In many countries with modern vehicle fleets, vehicle occupant protection technology is now effectively preventing serious injuries and saving lives. In addition, active safety systems are proving to be highly effective in preventing crashes. However, death and serious injuries are still commonly occurring in road crashes.  Globally, around 1.4 million people are killed in crashes each year, and this number is, if anything, increasing year on year.

In many highly motorised countries, the main challenges surrounding crash-injury prevention now involve the vulnerable road user (VRU) group. Some studies suggest that almost 70% of fatally injured road users in inner urban areas are VRUs and crashes involving pedestrians can exhibit unprediactable behaviours, and are especially problematic.

In many rapidly motorising countries, vulnerable road user crashes are still prevalent and are equally challenging, but there are also issues with many vehicle fleets having vehicles which do not offer adequate occupant protection, since they are not equipped with modern airbag and restraint systems. Furthermore, in many cases, many of these vehicles do not meet modern vehicle safety standards and would fail to comply with regulatory compliance testing requirements. Therefore, in crashes involving such vehicles, occupant safety is greatly compromised.

Furthermore, in both highly motorised and rapidly motorising countries, new challenges will become evident in the years ahead as connected and autonomous vehicles (CAVs) become a reality.  CAVs  will be capable of handling most of the manoeuvring and control functions of the vehicle in all traffic scenarios, but in urban settings, this will mean that CAVs will be required to interact with pedestrians, motorcyclists, and cyclists – and this could be problematic if the technology does not prove to be perfectly reliably. 

In this Special Edition, we welcome papers exploring issues relating to future road crash prevention, either through vehicle design, modification of driver behaviour and implementation of other traffic safety measures, including road infrastructure design. We also welcome studies relating to where current gaps in vehicle active and passive safety requirements are still evident, and how such gaps could be addressed.

We also welcome papers on the future prevention of vulnerable road user crashes and the likely impact of CAVs on these road user groups.

Prof. Dr. Andrew Morris
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Behavioral Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Safety
  • Injury causation
  • Driver behaviour
  • Human factors
  • Vulnerable road users
  • Connected and autonomous vehicles

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Saudi Women and Vision 2030: Bridging the Gap?
Behav. Sci. 2021, 11(10), 132; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bs11100132 - 27 Sep 2021
Viewed by 516
Abstract
(1) Background, Travel characteristics of Saudi women contrast significantly from those in the west. This is not only because they have different culture, attitudes and preferences but also until recently, Saudi women were not allowed to drive. In 2018, they were granted the [...] Read more.
(1) Background, Travel characteristics of Saudi women contrast significantly from those in the west. This is not only because they have different culture, attitudes and preferences but also until recently, Saudi women were not allowed to drive. In 2018, they were granted the right to drive. It has been anticipated that enabling women to drive will improve their mobility and employability. (2) Methods: This study presents a qualitative study into factors affecting Saudi women’s travel decisions “before” and “after” enabling women to drive in the Kingdom. Two six “before” and “after” focus groups have been carried out to investigate the decision-making process associated with Saudi women’s travel, available options of travel and perception of Saudi women towards private car driving. (3) Results: The results reveal that main travelling options for professional and high-income women is a private driver in the “before” scenario and a ride-share option with a family member. In the “after” scenario, high income professional women prefer “drive own car” option. Moreover, many of the participants indicated that it is likely that they might keep private drivers as well. (4) Conclusion. The results from this research indicate that there has been significant change in travel characteristics, attitudes and behaviour of Saudi women since they were granted the right to drive. This is likely to have significant implications for decision and policy makers. Further research into potential impacts of the current situation on car ownership and use, impacts on public transport system, environmental impacts and sustainability is needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Road Crash Injury and Driver Behavior)
Article
Autonomous Vehicles and Vulnerable Road-Users—Important Considerations and Requirements Based on Crash Data from Two Countries
Behav. Sci. 2021, 11(7), 101; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bs11070101 - 15 Jul 2021
Viewed by 899
Abstract
(1) Background: Passenger vehicles equipped with advanced driver-assistance system (ADAS) functionalities are becoming more prevalent within vehicle fleets. However, the full effects of offering such systems, which may allow for drivers to become less than 100% engaged with the task of driving, may [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Passenger vehicles equipped with advanced driver-assistance system (ADAS) functionalities are becoming more prevalent within vehicle fleets. However, the full effects of offering such systems, which may allow for drivers to become less than 100% engaged with the task of driving, may have detrimental impacts on other road-users, particularly vulnerable road-users, for a variety of reasons. (2) Crash data were analysed in two countries (Great Britain and Australia) to examine some challenging traffic scenarios that are prevalent in both countries and represent scenarios in which future connected and autonomous vehicles may be challenged in terms of safe manoeuvring. (3) Road intersections are currently very common locations for vulnerable road-user accidents; traffic flows and road-user behaviours at intersections can be unpredictable, with many vehicles behaving inconsistently (e.g., red-light running and failure to stop or give way), and many vulnerable road-users taking unforeseen risks. (4) Conclusions: The challenges of unpredictable vulnerable road-user behaviour at intersections (including road-users violating traffic or safe-crossing signals, or taking other risks) combined with the lack of knowledge of CAV responses to intersection rules, could be problematic. This could be further compounded by changes to nonverbal communication that currently exist between road-users, which could become more challenging once CAVs become more widespread. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Road Crash Injury and Driver Behavior)
Article
Motor Vehicle Collisions during Adolescence: The Role of Alexithymic Traits and Defense Strategies
Behav. Sci. 2021, 11(6), 79; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bs11060079 - 21 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 757
Abstract
International literature has shown that adolescents represent the population most at risk of fatal and nonfatal motor vehicle collisions (MVCs). Adolescents’ alexithymic traits and significant use of immature defense strategies have been seen to play a key role. This study aimed to investigate [...] Read more.
International literature has shown that adolescents represent the population most at risk of fatal and nonfatal motor vehicle collisions (MVCs). Adolescents’ alexithymic traits and significant use of immature defense strategies have been seen to play a key role. This study aimed to investigate the possible mediation role played by defense strategies use in the relationship between alexithymia and MVCs. Our sample consisted of 297 adolescents divided into four subgroups, based on the number of visits to the emergency department due to an MVC. We assessed adolescents’ alexithymic traits and defense strategies use through self-report instruments. Results showed that males reported a higher rate of MVCs than females. Higher rates of MVCs are associated with more alexithymic traits and maladaptive defense strategies use. Adolescents’ Acting Out and Omnipotence use significantly mediated the relationship between alexithymia and MVCs. Our findings suggest the recidivism of MVCs as an attempt to cope with emotional difficulties, with important clinical implications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Road Crash Injury and Driver Behavior)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop