Special Issue "Fostering Emotional and Social Well-Being at School and with Online Teaching: A Developmental Challenge for Educational Institutions"

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X). This special issue belongs to the section "Educational Psychology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Livia Taverna
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Education, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, 39042 Brixen-Bressanone, Italy
Interests: developmental and educational psychology; children's psychosocial wellbeing; learning developmental disabilities; adaptive behaviors; parenting; cultural psychology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Antonella Brighi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Education, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, 39042 Brixen-Bressanone, Italy
Interests: bullying; cyberbullying; mental health in childhood and in adolescence; psychological wellbeing
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We propose this Special Issue to collect scientific contributions, aimed primarily at research in an educational context, that seek to offer a further understanding of the mechanisms and factors that govern the construction of well-being in learning contexts. Ideally, this volume will be divided into three sections.

The first section will deal with studies and research that investigate the relationship between emotional wellbeing and learning in children and adolescents.

The second part of the volume will host studies dealing with the relationship between social wellbeing and academic learning or academic success.

Finally, the third section will be devoted to examples and case reports in which schools present their solutions addressing the educational challenges of building wellbeing.

All sections will be able to deal with both typical and atypical development trajectories, as well as face-to-face or online learning. 

Dr. Livia Taverna
Prof. Dr. Antonella Brighi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Behavioral Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • emotional well-being
  • social well-being
  • on-line teaching
  • in-presence teaching
  • learning and academic success
  • typical and atypical development

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Comparison on Well-Being, Engagement and Perceived School Climate in Secondary School Students with Learning Difficulties and Specific Learning Disorders: An Exploratory Study
Behav. Sci. 2021, 11(7), 103; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bs11070103 - 16 Jul 2021
Viewed by 721
Abstract
Reading and writing skills influence the social status of students, exerting effects not only on learning, but also on wellbeing. This study aimed to assess the impact of diagnosis of specific learning disorder on well-being in secondary-school students, comparing students with a diagnosis [...] Read more.
Reading and writing skills influence the social status of students, exerting effects not only on learning, but also on wellbeing. This study aimed to assess the impact of diagnosis of specific learning disorder on well-being in secondary-school students, comparing students with a diagnosis of specific learning disorder (SLD-group), students showing learning difficulties without diagnosis (LD-group) and students without learning difficulties (control-group). Students were tested with neuropsychological screening tests in order to identify learning difficulties and were further assessed by means of psychological and school well-being questionnaires. The results show that LD group perceive themselves as having a low sense of mastery and autonomy, less interest and engagement in daily activities and low peer social support than their schoolmates. This result highlights, for the LD group, a low well-being experience, which is not observed in the SLD and control groups. On the contrary, SLD group students do not differ from control group students in any dimensions except for the perceived parents’ support and involvement in school life, in which the SLD group show the highest scores. This work underlines the importance of having a diagnosis as it seems to work as a protective factor for both the psychological and school well-being of the student. Full article
Article
The Basic Psychological Needs in the Classroom Scale (BPN-CS)
Behav. Sci. 2021, 11(7), 96; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bs11070096 - 24 Jun 2021
Viewed by 792
Abstract
Recent experimental and theoretical studies have shown that the assessment of students’ satisfaction of their basic psychological needs (BPN) can be a powerful resource to identify different areas to improve their well-being, engagement, or learning achievement in school contexts. However, currently, [...] Read more.
Recent experimental and theoretical studies have shown that the assessment of students’ satisfaction of their basic psychological needs (BPN) can be a powerful resource to identify different areas to improve their well-being, engagement, or learning achievement in school contexts. However, currently, the number of validated tools to assess the satisfaction of the BPN is very low, hindering informed decision-making strategies at the educational level. The aim of this study was to develop and validate the Basic Psychological Needs in the Classroom Scale (BPN-CS) instrument, adapting existing instruments and putting the new tool to the test. The BPN-CS was developed to measure the level of satisfaction of autonomy, competence, relatedness, and novelty in the classroom. We tested the scale on a representative sample of 1344 Spanish elementary school students from 8 to 13 years old. A series of analyses were run in order to test the internal consistency of the main factors as well as to prove the convergent and divergent validity of the instrument. In summary, the BPN-CS is presented as a reliable and valid self-report instrument to measure basic psychological needs in a classroom context with elementary school pupils in the Spanish context. Full article
Article
Relationship between Emotional Intelligence, Educational Achievement and Academic Stress of Pre-Service Teachers
Behav. Sci. 2021, 11(7), 95; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bs11070095 - 23 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 893
Abstract
Emotional intelligence (EI) and stress are constructs that often characterize the teaching profession and are inversely related. There is evidence in the literature that suggests the importance of teachers working on EI in order to learn coping strategies and improve their teaching practices. [...] Read more.
Emotional intelligence (EI) and stress are constructs that often characterize the teaching profession and are inversely related. There is evidence in the literature that suggests the importance of teachers working on EI in order to learn coping strategies and improve their teaching practices. This descriptive and correlational study had the purpose of examining the social–emotional profile of future teachers based on their EI and academic stress levels in order to provide guidance for future stressful situations that will affect their future professional development. For this purpose, we used a random sampling for convenience in a university population enrolled in degrees of education at Andalusian universities (Spain), getting a sample of 1020 pre-service teachers. The results pointed to a superiority in EI, academic stress, and academic achievement in favor of females compared to males. The relationship among EI, academic stress, and student teachers’ achievement was demonstrated. Furthermore, some components of EI were positioned as important factors to improve student achievement and reduce academic stress. Once the high incidence of these constructs on academic achievement was confirmed, the importance of developing EI and coping and stress skills training programs, aimed at improving academic success and their subsequent professional development, was demonstrated. Full article
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