Special Issue "Chemical Contaminants and Residues in Beverages"

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 March 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. María Carmen Garrigós
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition & Food Sciences, University of Alicante, San Vicente del Raspeig, ES-03690 Alicante, Spain
Interests: innovative biodegradable polymers; valorisation of agro-food wastes and by-products; encapsulation systems for bioactive compounds; food active packaging; natural antioxidants/antimicrobials; sustainable extraction methods
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chemical contaminants and residues in the beverages industry can be present as a result of processing or storage; showing a final impact on the quality and safety of the food product and increasing consumer concern. Some examples of chemical contaminants could be those released from the manufacture of food contact materials, undeclared ingredients or impurities present on food additives, veterinary drugs and pesticide residues, heat-generated toxic residues, heavy metals, organic substances, natural toxins, among others. Risk assessment and analytical methods to monitor and control the presence of these substances are necessary.

Original and review papers dealing with all aspects of chemical contaminants and residues in beverages are welcome for inclusion in this Special Issue; including those related to the presence of main chemical contaminants and processes involved in this contamination, their implications on human health, and analytical methods used for their determination and control in beverages.

Prof. Mari Carmen Garrigós Selva
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chemical contaminants
  • residues
  • beverages
  • food contact materials
  • food additives
  • analytical methods

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Determination of Macroelements, Transition Elements, and Anionic Contents of Commercial Roasted Ground Coffee Available in Jordanian Markets
Beverages 2020, 6(1), 16; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages6010016 - 09 Mar 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1073
Abstract
Coffee is one of the most common drinks worldwide. Due to the variability of elements composition, coffee is important for human health. The aim of this study is to assess the concentration of certain selected elements of commercial samples of roasted ground coffee [...] Read more.
Coffee is one of the most common drinks worldwide. Due to the variability of elements composition, coffee is important for human health. The aim of this study is to assess the concentration of certain selected elements of commercial samples of roasted ground coffee available in Jordanian markets. The concentrations of macroelement components (sodium, potassium, and calcium), transition elements (lead, cadmium, iron, nickel, and copper), and anion contents (sulfate, nitrate, fluoride, chloride, and phosphate ions) have been determined in nine samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Obtained results showed that all tested samples contain macroelementscalcium, sodium, and potassium, in a concentration ranging from 6.18 to 162.6 μg/gram of dry weight (in detail: calcium, 6.96–9.81 μg/g; sodium, 121.54–162.60 μg/g; potassium, 6.18–10.23 μg/g). Regarding transition elements, all samples tested contained variable concentrations of iron and copper (1.26–2.07 and 0.24–0.66 μg/g, respectively), while they lacked lead, cadmium, and nickel (only one sample contained 0.1 μg/g for nickel). In addition, all tested samples contained variable anionic concentrations. The lack of toxic selected elements (lead, cadmium, and nickel) in these samples appears to indicate the significance of these coffee samples as a source of useful selected elements for human health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Contaminants and Residues in Beverages)

Review

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Review
Recent Trends in the Analysis of Chemical Contaminants in Beverages
Beverages 2020, 6(2), 32; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages6020032 - 17 May 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2323
Abstract
Chemical contaminants should not be present in beverages for human consumption, but could eventually be ingested by consumers as they may appear naturally from the environment or be produced by anthropogenic sources. These contaminants could belong to many different chemical sources, including heavy [...] Read more.
Chemical contaminants should not be present in beverages for human consumption, but could eventually be ingested by consumers as they may appear naturally from the environment or be produced by anthropogenic sources. These contaminants could belong to many different chemical sources, including heavy metals, amines, bisphenols, phthalates, pesticides, perfluorinated compounds, inks, ethyl carbamate, and others. It is well known that these hazardous chemicals in beverages can represent a severe threat by the potential risk of generating diseases to humans if no strict quality control is applied during beverages processing. This review compiles the most updated knowledge of the presence of potential contaminants in various types of beverages (both alcoholic and non-alcoholic), as well as in their containers, to prevent undesired migration. Special attention is given to the extraction and pre-concentration techniques applied to these samples, as well as to the analytical techniques necessary for the determination of chemicals with a potential contaminant effect. Finally, an overview of the current legislation is carried out, as well as future trends of research in this field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Contaminants and Residues in Beverages)
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Other

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Case Report
Compound Analysis of Jing Liqueur and nrf2 Activation by Jing Liqueur—One of the Most Popular Beverages in China
Beverages 2020, 6(1), 1; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages6010001 - 31 Dec 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1407
Abstract
The aim of this study is to identify the minor compounds in Jing liqueur, determine the concentration of metals, amino acids, and polysaccharides, and evaluate their Nrf2 activity and cytotoxicity. Jing liqueur that contains Chinese medicine is one of the best-selling liqueurs in [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to identify the minor compounds in Jing liqueur, determine the concentration of metals, amino acids, and polysaccharides, and evaluate their Nrf2 activity and cytotoxicity. Jing liqueur that contains Chinese medicine is one of the best-selling liqueurs in China, which is also marketed in the United States. Totally, we have isolated 189 minor compounds including one new molecule (7) from a concentrated Jing liqueur, with the concentrations of most isolated compounds at micromolar levels. The structures of all these compounds were determined by using MS and NMR (1D and 2D) or by comparison of their chemical and physical data with reported values in the literatures. Besides, the concentrations of iron (0.52 mg/L), zinc (0.21 mg/L), calcium (11.0 mg/L), L-proline (2.33 mg/L), L-arginine (1.73 mg/L), total amino acids (9.84 mg/L), and total polysaccharides (337.4 mg/L) were determined. Jing liqueur, the five fractions and most of the compounds isolated from Jing liqueur were screened for their activities in the Nrf2-ARE and MTT assays. At 5.2 mg/mL the crude enhanced the Nrf2 activity. At 80 μg/mL, fraction IV weakly but fraction V strongly activated Nrf2. Among the compounds screened in the Nrf2 assay, eighteen activated Nrf2 at 40 μg/mL and compounds 51 and 126 from fraction V were the most active. The crude, all the five fractions, and Nrf2 activators were not cytotoxic toward HepG2 cells. In conclusion, Jing liqueur contains different classes of compounds including flavonoids, terpenoids, alkaloids, coumarins, cinnamic acid or coumaric acid, and phenyl ethanol (or acetic acid) derivatives, benzoquinone, naphthoquinone, anthraquinones or phenanphrene derivatives, xanthones, chromone, and γ-pyrone derivatives, lignans, other aromatic compounds, and others. Jing liqueur and the eighteen compounds, which were isolated from Jing liqueur, could activate Nrf2 without any cytotoxicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Contaminants and Residues in Beverages)
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