Special Issue "Distilled Beverages: Science and Technology Across the Supply Chain"

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Paul Hughes
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Oregon State University, Oregon, USA
Interests: visual and taste performance of beers and spirits; distillation performance of spirits and botanical flavors; enhanced methods for sensory evaluation; low energy methods for ethanol-water separations; accelerated maturation of “brown” spirits

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Distilled beverages have been produced in most countries around the world for well over 1000 years, and today are enjoying a resurgence, not least because of product innovation and many new manufacturers entering the industry. This Special Issue focuses on the science and technology of the distilled beverages sector, and invites authors to submit reviews and original research papers to showcase their work on the scientific and technological aspects of the distilled beverages supply chain. Examples might include consideration of a specific distilled beverage category, with submissions addressing more localized beverages, such as mescal and Asian white spirits particularly welcome. Additionally, other aspects of the supply chain, such as barrel alternatives, wood sustainability and co-product processing are highly relevant to 21st century distilled beverage production.

Prof. Paul Hughes
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Boltzmann-Based Empirical Model to Calculate Volume Loss during Spirit Ageing
Beverages 2019, 5(4), 60; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages5040060 - 10 Oct 2019
Viewed by 884
Abstract
The Boltzmann equation is applied to fit data of volume loss for evaporation (in %) during spirit ageing in northern white oak (Quercus Alba) standard barrels of 205 L (+/− 10 L) using a temperature and humidity controlled cellar. The Boltzmann [...] Read more.
The Boltzmann equation is applied to fit data of volume loss for evaporation (in %) during spirit ageing in northern white oak (Quercus Alba) standard barrels of 205 L (+/− 10 L) using a temperature and humidity controlled cellar. The Boltzmann equation satisfactory fitted to the experimental data of the volume loss against temperature at constant humidity. Two parameters of the Boltzmann equation showed a linear dependency on the relative humidity of the air, while the other two parameters exhibited a constant value independently of the air humidity. The found empirical mathematical model can be used to calculate the volume loss for evaporation of spirits (40% v/v of ethanol) during ageing in terms of relative humidity (range: 40%–95%) and temperature (range: 10–30 °C) with significant accuracy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Distilled Beverages: Science and Technology Across the Supply Chain)
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Article
Preliminary Studies on the Use of Reactive Distillation in the Production of Beverage Spirits
Beverages 2019, 5(2), 29; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages5020029 - 02 Apr 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1480
Abstract
Distilled alcoholic beverages have been produced through fermentation and distillation for centuries but have not purposefully involved a chemical reaction to produce a flavoring. Introducing a microorganism to produce butyric acid along with the typical yeast ethanol fermentation sets up a reactive distillation [...] Read more.
Distilled alcoholic beverages have been produced through fermentation and distillation for centuries but have not purposefully involved a chemical reaction to produce a flavoring. Introducing a microorganism to produce butyric acid along with the typical yeast ethanol fermentation sets up a reactive distillation system to flavor a spirit with ethyl butyrate and butyric acid. The ternary interactions of water, ethanol, and butyric acid allow all three to vaporize in the stripping distillation, thus they are concentrated in the low wines and give a large excess of ethanol compared to butyric acid for better reaction completion. The stripping distillation has also been modeled on Aspen Plus® V9 software (by Aspen Technology, Inc. Bedford, MA, USA) and coincides well with a test stripping distillation at the bench scale. Amberlyst® 15 wet catalyst was added to a subsequent distillation, resulting in the production of the desired ethyl butyrate in the distillate, measured by gas chromatography. Primary sensory evaluation has determined that this process has a profound effect on the smell of the spirit with the main flavor being similar to fruity bubble gum. The current results will provide a pathway for creating spirits with a desired flavor on demand without acquiring a heavy capital cost if a beverage distillation column is already purchased. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Distilled Beverages: Science and Technology Across the Supply Chain)
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Article
Chemical Characterization of Craft Filuferru Spirit from Sardinia, Italy
Beverages 2018, 4(3), 62; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages4030062 - 20 Aug 2018
Viewed by 2094
Abstract
Traditional Filuferru is an ancient spirit from Sardinia, Italy, which is usually obtained from the distillation of wine or grape marc. In this contribution, the results of the first chemical characterization of a wide number of crafts Filuferru samples has been accomplished in [...] Read more.
Traditional Filuferru is an ancient spirit from Sardinia, Italy, which is usually obtained from the distillation of wine or grape marc. In this contribution, the results of the first chemical characterization of a wide number of crafts Filuferru samples has been accomplished in terms of an evaluation of the alcoholic strength, qualitative and quantitative gas-chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the volatile composition of the distillate, and its trace element composition by means an inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method. Both instrumental methods have been validated and applied on 21 craft samples of Filuferru, whereas one sample of commercial distillate has been analyzed for comparison purposes. Alcoholic strength ranged between 41.0 and 62.4% (v/v). Sixty volatile compounds were identified and ten of them have been quantified. Analogies and differences with Grappa (i.e., the Italian distilled spirit closer to Filuferru) have been highlighted in the qualitative and quantitative profile of this matrix. Often meaningful amounts of acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate, dietyl acetal, and acetic acid were measured. Elemental analysis, performed on toxic, non-toxic elements, and oligoelements, 18 in total, revealed a wide variability of concentrations in both analytes and samples. High concentrations of Cu are sometimes evidenced, which are likely caused by losses from the distillation apparatus. The principal components analysis (PCA) allowed the differentiation of the ten volatile compounds quantified in two groups: the former, as described mainly by PC1, constituted by acetic acid, ethyl acetate, dietyl acetal, and acetaldehyde, and the second, described by PC2, constituted by 1-propanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, the two coeluiting isomers 2-methyl-1-butanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol,1-hexanol, 2-phenylethanol, and 2,3-butanediol. Data obtained may be useful in order to establish a regulation for the production of high-quality traditional Filuferru from Sardinia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Distilled Beverages: Science and Technology Across the Supply Chain)
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