Special Issue "Energy Drinks"

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2015).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Juan Del Coso
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Sport Sciences (ICD), Rey Juan Carlos University, 28943 Fuenlabrada, Spain
Interests: exercise performance; sports nutrition; exercise physiology; anti-doping; genetics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Despite their relative novelty—most popular energy drinks were commercially launched around 1990—energy drinks have become one of the most consumed beverages worldwide. In fact, the energy drinks market has increased by 5000% since 2000, and today, it generates over $9 billion in sales. The massive use of these beverages requires exceptional scientific attention to determine the accuracy of the purported benefits associated to these drinks. Among the main ingredients of energy drinks, caffeine is considered the most active constituent and thus, previous findings related to the ingestion of caffeine/caffeinated products can be extrapolated to energy drinks consumption. However, the combination of caffeine with other substances present in energy drinks, such as taurine and vitamins, requires further investigation to determine the differences between caffeine from caffeinated energy drinks. On the other hand, several scientific reports have indicated that energy drinks consumption might be accompanied by several negative side effects, including insomnia, nervousness, gastric irritation, and hypertension. Although these effects are sometimes related to the consumption of high doses of energy drinks, it is necessary to have more objective information, so as to elucidate the prevalence of side effects when energy drinks are consumed at “social” doses.

Prof. Dr. Juan Del Coso Garrigós
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • Energy drinks
  • caffeine
  • amino acids
  • sports nutrition
  • physical performance
  • endurance capacity
  • taurine

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Communication
Consumption of Sports and Energy Drinks by High School Athletes in the United States: A Pilot Study
Beverages 2015, 1(3), 218-224; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages1030218 - 22 Sep 2015
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3764
Abstract
Sports and energy (S/E) drinks are commonly used by high school (HS) athletes, yet little is known about this population’s consumption patterns or the drinks’ side-effects. The objectives of this pilot study were to survey HS athletes about their use of S/E drinks [...] Read more.
Sports and energy (S/E) drinks are commonly used by high school (HS) athletes, yet little is known about this population’s consumption patterns or the drinks’ side-effects. The objectives of this pilot study were to survey HS athletes about their use of S/E drinks and assess potential side-effects. One hundred American HS athletes (72 were female; 27 were male; one did not identify gender) were part of a cross-sectional internet-based survey. The mean age of the athletes was 16.0 ± 1.1 years. The athletes self-reported S/E consumption patterns, motivations for consumption, and drink side-effects. Nearly two-thirds (59.5%) of athletes surveyed were at least occasional users of sports drinks, and more than one-third (37.3%) were at least occasional users of energy drinks. Of the athletes who had ever drunk an S/E drink, 49.5% drank their first sport drink at ≤ 8 years and 41.3% consumed their first energy drink ≤ 11–12 years of age. The most common motivation for consumption of sports drinks was to rehydrate (84.1%) and of energy drinks was to gain energy (61.8%). Side effects of S/E drinks were frequently reported; 25.3% of energy drink users reporting being nervous/jittery after consumption. Thus HS athletes should be cautioned about consumption of S/E drinks until more is understood about their short- and long-term side-effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Drinks)
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Review
Cardiovascular Complications of Energy Drinks
Beverages 2015, 1(2), 104-126; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages1020104 - 19 Jun 2015
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 8922
Abstract
Energy drinks (EDs) are gaining popularity every year with a broad consumer base including athletes, amateur competitors, and even those experiencing work-related fatigue. Evidence indicates that a significant number of individuals who consume EDs experience resultant morbidity and/or mortality, with a preponderance of [...] Read more.
Energy drinks (EDs) are gaining popularity every year with a broad consumer base including athletes, amateur competitors, and even those experiencing work-related fatigue. Evidence indicates that a significant number of individuals who consume EDs experience resultant morbidity and/or mortality, with a preponderance of cases involving teenagers and young adults. Adverse effects of ED consumption may occur in healthy persons, however certain individuals may be particularly susceptible to complications. At-risk populations include those of young age, the caffeine-naïve, or caffeine-sensitive, pregnant women, competitive athletes, and those with underlying cardiovascular disease. This paper summarizes the cardiovascular complications associated with ED use and provides suggestions on consumption of these drinks in various populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Drinks)
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