Special Issue "Fruit Juices: Technology, Chemistry, and Nutrition 2.0"

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Antonio Cilla
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Nutrition and Food Science Area, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Valencia, Avda. Vicente Andrés Estellés s/n, Burjassot, 46100 Valencia, Spain
Interests: functional foods; bioactive compounds; antioxidant capacity; sterols; phytochemicals; bioaccessibility; bioavailability; bioactivity; cell cultures; chemoprevention; oxidative stress; eryptosis.
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Alessandro Attanzio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biological, Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technologies (STEBICEF), University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy
Interests: biochemistry; Sicilian foods; bioactive compounds; phytochemicals; bioactivity; cell cultures (colon, breast, cervix, liver, neuroblastoma); chemoprevention; oxidative stress; eryptosis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Guadalupe Garcia-Llatas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Nutrition and Food Science Area, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Valencia, Avn. Vicente Andrés Estellés s/n, Burjassot, 46100 Valencia, Spain
Interests: human milk; infant foods; plant sterols; sterol oxidation products; lipid oxidation; functional fruit beverages; serum lipids; microbiota; clinical trials; chromatography; functional lipids; in vitro gastrointestinal digestion; bioaccessibility; storage; processing
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fruit juices can be considered to be natural functional foods as, beyond their nutritional value, they can provide other compounds with potential health benefits, such as fiber, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidant phytochemicals (polyphenols, carotenoids, tocopherols, and phytosterols, among others). These phytochemicals can either be naturally present or incorporated using extracts from, raw, or by-products of plant foods. Fruit juice manufacturing techniques range from traditional methods, such as blending, formulation, and fermentation, to advanced techniques, such as microencapsulation, edible films, coatings, and non-thermal processing technologies (high-pressure processing, pulsed electric fields, ultrasounds, etc.) designed to protect bioactive compounds against degradation and increase their bioaccessibility/bioavailability (and, hence, potentially, bioactivity) without compromising their sensory attributes.

This Special Issue aims to present a collection of original research and review articles that provide new insights into, and data on, the technology, chemistry, and nutrition of fruit juices. Potential topics include:

-evaluation of nutritional and bioactive compounds in conventional and newly designed functional fruit juices and blends that combine fruits and vegetables;

-determination of the impact of conventional and new non-thermal processing technologies on bioactive compounds present in fruit juices;

-assessment of the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of bioactive compounds in these beverages; and

-unraveling the potential health effects of fruit juices using in vitro, animal, and human studies.

Prof. Dr. Antonio Cilla
Dr. Alessandro Attanzio
Dr. Guadalupe Garcia-Llatas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fruit juices
  • blends of fruit and vegetable juices
  • functional foods
  • conventional and novel processing technologies
  • bioactive compounds
  • bioaccessibility/bioavailability
  • bioactivity

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Short Wave Ultraviolet Light (UV-C) Effectiveness in the Inactivation of Bacterial Spores Inoculated in Turbid Suspensions and in Cloudy Apple Juice
Beverages 2021, 7(1), 11; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages7010011 - 16 Feb 2021
Viewed by 407
Abstract
Liquid foods might present interferences in their optical properties that can reduce the effectiveness of short-wave ultraviolet radiation (UV-C) treatments used for sterilization purposes. The effect of turbidity as UV-C interference factor against the inactivation of bacterial spores was analysed by using phosphate-buffered [...] Read more.
Liquid foods might present interferences in their optical properties that can reduce the effectiveness of short-wave ultraviolet radiation (UV-C) treatments used for sterilization purposes. The effect of turbidity as UV-C interference factor against the inactivation of bacterial spores was analysed by using phosphate-buffered saline solutions (PBS) of different turbidity values (2000, 2500, and 3000 NTU) which were adjusted with the addition of apple fibre. These suspensions were inoculated with spores of Bacillus subtilis and Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris. While higher UV-C doses increased the inactivation rates of spores, these were reduced when turbidity values increased; a dose of 28.7 J/mL allowed inactivation rates of B. subtilis spores of 3.96 Log in a 2000-NTU suspension compared with 2.81 Log achieved in the 3000-NTU one. Spores of B. subtilis were more UV-C-resistant than A. acidoterrestris. Cloudy apple juice inoculated with A. acidoterrestris spores was processed by UV-C at different doses in a single pass and with recirculation of the matrix through the reactor. Inactivation increased significantly with recirculation, surpassing 5 Log after 125 J/mL compared with 0.13 Log inactivation after a single-pass treatment at the same UV-C dose. UV-C treatments with recirculation affected the optical properties (absorption coefficient at 254 nm and turbidity) of juice and increased browning as UV-C doses became higher. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fruit Juices: Technology, Chemistry, and Nutrition 2.0)
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Open AccessArticle
Degradation Kinetics of Betacyanins during the Pasteurization and Storage of Cactus Pear (Opuntia dillenii Haw.) Juice Using the Arrhenius, Eyring, and Ball Models
Beverages 2021, 7(1), 2; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages7010002 - 23 Dec 2020
Viewed by 625
Abstract
Betacyanin stability was assessed over temperatures ranging from 60 to 90 °C for cactus pear (Opuntia dillenii Haw.) juice. The juice showed a betacyanin content of 0.76 g/kg. The rate constants for the betacyanin degradation and isothermal kinetic parameters were calculated according [...] Read more.
Betacyanin stability was assessed over temperatures ranging from 60 to 90 °C for cactus pear (Opuntia dillenii Haw.) juice. The juice showed a betacyanin content of 0.76 g/kg. The rate constants for the betacyanin degradation and isothermal kinetic parameters were calculated according to the following three models: Arrhenius, Eyring, and Ball. The fittings of the models were found to be close to one other with SSE values of 0.0964, 0.0964, and 0.0974, respectively. However, because the estimated parameters for the Ball equation happened to be less correlated than the parameters of the other models, this equation was then used for the simulations. The parameters for z and D0 were 42.21 °C and 6.79 × 104 s, respectively. Betacyanins were found to resist typical heat treatment conditions (F70°C values between 100 and 200 min), with a maximum loss of 10% when the temperature was above 80 °C. The time/temperature combinations that could assure both the safety of the product and the preservation of the betacyanins were identified. With Enterococcus faecalis as the reference, when the temperature was 100 °C, the pasteurization time satisfying these two conditions was 0.6 min, whereas it was 180 min when the temperature was 62 °C. The degradation of betacynins during storage was positively correlated with temperature and was accompanied by the appearance of a brown shade. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fruit Juices: Technology, Chemistry, and Nutrition 2.0)
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Open AccessArticle
Degradation of Preservatives with the Formation of Off-Odor Volatile Compounds—The Case of Strawberry-Flavored Bottled Water
Beverages 2020, 6(4), 67; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages6040067 - 25 Nov 2020
Viewed by 647
Abstract
Foods preserved with sorbic acid or its salts can undergo spoilage with the formation of chemicals characterized by odors of plastic, hydrocarbons, or kerosene. 1,3-pentadiene, which is formed through the decarboxylation of sorbic acid or its salts, is one such compound. Numerous species [...] Read more.
Foods preserved with sorbic acid or its salts can undergo spoilage with the formation of chemicals characterized by odors of plastic, hydrocarbons, or kerosene. 1,3-pentadiene, which is formed through the decarboxylation of sorbic acid or its salts, is one such compound. Numerous species of molds and yeasts have been reported as capable of degrading sorbic acid. This work is aimed to identify the off-odor compounds in samples of strawberry-flavored water preserved with potassium sorbate and sodium benzoate. In addition, the mold isolated from this drink was evaluated for the ability to form undesirable compounds, and the results revealed the presence of 1,4-pentadiene and benzaldehyde in the tested samples. The mold isolated from the samples was identified as Penicillium corylophilum. During its 5-day incubation at 25 °C in a liquid medium, potassium sorbate added at a final concentration of 200 and 400 mg/L was completely assimilated by the growing mycelium and converted into 1,4-pentadiene. The concentration of the latter was determined as 46.5 and 92.6 mg/L, respectively. The decrease in the concentration of sodium benzoate exceeded 53% in the broth spiked at 200 mg/L and 23% at 400 mg/L, resulting in the formation of benzaldehyde. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fruit Juices: Technology, Chemistry, and Nutrition 2.0)
Open AccessArticle
Effect of 1-Methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) and Storage Atmosphere on the Volatile Aroma Composition of Cloudy and Clear Apple Juices
Beverages 2020, 6(4), 59; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages6040059 - 30 Sep 2020
Viewed by 678
Abstract
The effects of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), storage atmosphere (controlled (CA) or regular (RA)), and juice processing (clear or cloudy) on the volatile aroma compounds from McIntosh and Honeycrisp apples following 4-month storage were studied. All the major esters, aldehydes, and total volatile content from [...] Read more.
The effects of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), storage atmosphere (controlled (CA) or regular (RA)), and juice processing (clear or cloudy) on the volatile aroma compounds from McIntosh and Honeycrisp apples following 4-month storage were studied. All the major esters, aldehydes, and total volatile content from McIntosh juice were significantly affected by the two-way interaction between harvest maturity and 1-MCP treatment (p ≤ 0.01), as well as harvest maturity and storage atmosphere (p ≤ 0.001). In McIntosh juices, a remarkable reduction of all types of esters, aldehydes, most alcohols, and total volatile compounds was found when juices were prepared from 1-MCP-treated apples. In Honeycrisp, significant differences in the level of esters and the total volatile aroma was caused by storage atmosphere and juice processing techniques (p ≤ 0.001), but not by 1-MCP treatment. As compared to clear juices, cloudy juice samples from Honeycrisp had a considerably higher content of total volatiles, esters, and aldehydes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fruit Juices: Technology, Chemistry, and Nutrition 2.0)
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