Special Issue "Novel Beverages and Novel Technologies for Their Production"

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (9 January 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Konstantinos Papadimitriou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Technology, School of Agricultural Technology and Food Technology and Nutrition, Technological Educational Institute of Peloponnese, Greece
Interests: Dairy Microbiology and Technology; Fermented foods; Food metagenomics; Physiology and Genetics of lactic acid bacteria; Microbial Genomics
Dr. Marina Papadelli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture and Foods, University of Peloponnese, Greece
Interests: lactic acid bacteria; bacteriocins; probiotics; fermented foods microbiology; dairy products
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. John Kapolos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Technology, School of Agricultural Technology and Food Technology and Nutrition, Technological Educational Institute of Peloponnese, Greece
Interests: physicochemical aspects in food biotechnology; food quality and safety; kinetic study of alcoholic fermentation; physical chemistry of interfaces

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Beverages have been a part of human nutrition for millennia. There are several beverages that are imprinted in the mind of consumers around the world. Such beverages were invented in the past and their production was optimized over hundreds of years before spreading throughout the world. Beverages can be separated into four general categories: fermented, not fermented, alcoholic, and non-alcoholic. Today, there are plenty of novel beverages appearing in the market and many more that are described in the literature. This trend reflects the increasing demand of the consumer for beverages with new and improved flavors, enhanced nutrient value, and functional roles that often need to satisfy diverse dietary lifestyles such as vegetarian, vegan, allergen-free, low carbohydrate calories, etc. As a result, scientists and technologists turn towards new and sometimes exotic raw materials to be employed in both traditional and new schemes for the production of beverages. The application of new technologies is also essential to achieve the desired product.

The scope of this special issue concerns all topics related to the development of novel beverages and novel technologies required for their production. Studies related to the application of novel technologies in well-established beverages will be also considered. We aim for a collection of high-quality papers that will be useful for researchers and practitioners in the field.

Dr. Konstantinos Papadimitriou
Dr. Marina Papadelli
Dr. John Kapolos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Sugary Kefir: Microbial Identification and Biotechnological Properties
Beverages 2019, 5(4), 61; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages5040061 - 15 Oct 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1168
Abstract
Background: The aim of the present study was to assess the microecosystem composition of three different fruit kefir grains used for the fermentation of apple juice (NAJ), cherry juice (SCN), and a solution of sugary water, enriched with plums (BSS). Methods: Yeast and [...] Read more.
Background: The aim of the present study was to assess the microecosystem composition of three different fruit kefir grains used for the fermentation of apple juice (NAJ), cherry juice (SCN), and a solution of sugary water, enriched with plums (BSS). Methods: Yeast and bacterial populations were enumerated using classical microbiological techniques, clustered by RAPD-PCR genotyping, and identified by sequencing of the D1/D2 region of 26S-rRNA gene and the V1-V3 region of 16S-rRNA gene, respectively. The caseinolytic/lipolytic activities and the production of antimicrobial compounds were assessed by well diffusion assays. The proteolytic and lipolytic capacity were further assessed by SDS-PAGE and titrimetric assay, respectively. Results: Yeast and bacterial populations were enumerated at 6.28, 6.58, and 6.41 log CFU/g and at 4.32, 4.85, and 4.34 log CFU/g, regarding BSS, NAJ, and SCN, respectively. Saccharomyces cerevisiae dominated all three sugary kefir grains; Kluyveromyces marxianus formed a secondary microbiota in BSS and NAJ. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens dominated NAJ and SCN; Lactobacillus rhamnosus dominated BSS. Four bacteria and nine yeast isolates exhibited proteolytic activity. Forty bacteria and 45 yeast isolates possessed lipolytic activity. No antibacterial activity was detected. Conclusions: Prevalence of yeast over bacterial populations was evident in all samples assessed. Several bacterial and yeast strains exhibited proteolytic and lipolytic activities, making them suitable candidates for inclusion in starter cultures for milk and sugary kefir fermentation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Beverages and Novel Technologies for Their Production)
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Article
Perception of Bitter Taste through Time-Intensity Measurements as Influenced by Taste Modulation Compounds in Steviol Glycoside Sweetened Beverages
Beverages 2019, 5(3), 52; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages5030052 - 20 Aug 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1197
Abstract
To limit sugar consumption and maintain sweetness levels in the diet, food and beverage developers often use high potency sweeteners (HPSs) as alternatives. Steviol glycosides are considered a consumer-friendly alternative but they are perceived to have a bitter taste accompanied by sweet and [...] Read more.
To limit sugar consumption and maintain sweetness levels in the diet, food and beverage developers often use high potency sweeteners (HPSs) as alternatives. Steviol glycosides are considered a consumer-friendly alternative but they are perceived to have a bitter taste accompanied by sweet and bitter lingering. Recently, taste modulators have been discovered that help to alleviate negative attributes like bitterness of HPSs. To show that taste modulation compounds (TMCs) decrease perceived bitterness associated with steviol glycosides, a trained descriptive panel (n = 9) performed a single-attribute time-intensity (TI) assessment over 2 min. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze TI curves and curve parameters (AUC, Imax and Tmax). Principal components analysis (PCA) was also used to assess TI curves. Results showed that statistically significant results depended on the analysis method. Bitterness perception was shown to persist less over 2 min for steviol glycosides with TMCs when assessing raw scores and parameters. The same was not found using differences from control curves or weighted curves from PCA. These findings demonstrate that particular TMCs may subtly decrease perceived bitterness of steviol glycosides. However, business objectives of TMC use may dictate what kind of analysis method to use when analyzing perceived bitter perception of TMCs over time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Beverages and Novel Technologies for Their Production)
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Article
Biocatalyst Potential of Cellulose-Degrading Microorganisms Isolated from Orange Juice Processing Waste
Beverages 2019, 5(1), 21; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages5010021 - 02 Mar 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1282
Abstract
Cellulases can be applied as macerating and peeling enzymes in the orange juice processing industry. In this work, indigenous cellulose-degrading microorganisms were isolated from orange juice processing waste through successive enrichment procedures using carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as the sole carbon source. A total [...] Read more.
Cellulases can be applied as macerating and peeling enzymes in the orange juice processing industry. In this work, indigenous cellulose-degrading microorganisms were isolated from orange juice processing waste through successive enrichment procedures using carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as the sole carbon source. A total of 24 microbial isolates were screened for their ability to grow in CMC liquid medium, resulting in the selection of seven isolates. The latter were further assessed by determining their endo-1,4-β-d-glucanase, exo-1,4-β-d-glucanase, and β-1,4-d-glucosidase activities, of which their respective activities were as high as 3.89, 10.67, and 10.69 U/mg protein. All cellulose-degraders selected belonged to the genus Paenibacillus, although to distinct operational taxonomic units related to P. xylanexedens, P. tundrae, and P. pabuli (operational taxonomic unit—OTU#1) and to P. wynnii, P. odorifer, and P. donghaensis (OTU#2) spectrum. Regarding the cellulase activities of the orange juice processing waste, endo-1,4-β-d-glucanase activity (4.00 ± 0.11 U/g) was exerted only extracellularly, whereas exo-1,4-β-d-glucanase (2.60 ± 0.19 U/g) and β-1,4-d-glucosidase (5.69 ± 0.23 U/g) activities were exhibited both extracellularly and intracellularly. In conclusion, orange juice processing waste can be considered as a valuable source for the isolation of cellulose-degrading microbiota with potential uses in beverage industry, solid state fermentation and energy production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Beverages and Novel Technologies for Their Production)
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Communication
Antioxidant Properties of a Yogurt Beverage Enriched with Salal (Gaultheria shallon) Berries and Blackcurrant (Ribes nigrum) Pomace during Cold Storage
Beverages 2019, 5(1), 2; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages5010002 - 27 Dec 2018
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2005
Abstract
Aqueous extracts (20% w/w) of dried berry fruits and skins were used as sources of phenolic compounds to fortify yogurt beverages. The total phenol and anthocyanin content of the reformulated yogurts were determined, and the antioxidant properties were compared to plain yogurt (C) [...] Read more.
Aqueous extracts (20% w/w) of dried berry fruits and skins were used as sources of phenolic compounds to fortify yogurt beverages. The total phenol and anthocyanin content of the reformulated yogurts were determined, and the antioxidant properties were compared to plain yogurt (C) during storage at 4 °C for a total period of four weeks. Yogurt beverages fortified with salal berry (SB) extracts contained higher amounts of phenolic compounds (>69.9 μg GAE/mL) and anthocyanins (>19.12 mg C3G/L) compared to drinks supplemented with blackcurrant pomace (BC) extract (>50.13 μg GAE/mL and >10.80 mg C3G/L respectively). Storage affected the stability of anthocyanins, whereas total phenol content remained unaffected. Yogurts with SB displayed the highest antioxidant capacity followed by samples with BC, which is attributed to the radical scavenging effect of the bioactive compounds present with antioxidant properties. The antioxidant capacity of the yogurt beverages fortified with fruit extracts was maintained during cold storage. Findings of this study indicate that SB and BC pomace can be used as functional ingredients to increase the antioxidant potential of yogurt beverages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Beverages and Novel Technologies for Their Production)
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Article
Storage Stability of Novel Functional Drinks Based on Ricotta Cheese Whey and Fruit Juices
Beverages 2018, 4(3), 67; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages4030067 - 05 Sep 2018
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1791
Abstract
To study the storage stability of drinks produced by blending ricotta cheese whey (RCW) with fruit juices, apple-RCW and apple and blueberry mix (50:50)-RCW (juice/RCW ratio: 70/30, 14.5% soluble solids content) were prepared. Color, sugar and organic acid profiles, antioxidant composition, and sensory [...] Read more.
To study the storage stability of drinks produced by blending ricotta cheese whey (RCW) with fruit juices, apple-RCW and apple and blueberry mix (50:50)-RCW (juice/RCW ratio: 70/30, 14.5% soluble solids content) were prepared. Color, sugar and organic acid profiles, antioxidant composition, and sensory features were analyzed after 15 to 150 days of storage on an open shelf at room temperature. A browning phenomenon occurred in the apple-RCW-based drink, while no significant color changes occurred in the mix-based drink. Significant degradation of polyphenol compounds (TPC) occurred in both drinks, but more markedly in the mix-based one. Storage strongly influenced the stability of the total monomeric anthocyanins (MAP) due to their sensitivity to temperature and light. Antioxidant capacity was preserved in both drinks, suggesting that the antioxidant capacity of Maillard reaction products and/or polymeric anthocyanins formed during storage compensated for the TPC/MAP loss. Sugar and organic acid profiles changed without influencing the sensory characteristics. Except for the sourness intensity in the apple-based drink, which increased significantly, storage did not negatively influence the sensory parameters, so both RCW-based drinks obtained high acceptance scores at the end of the storage period. Despite the bioactive compound losses, both drinks provided interesting nutritional value at the end of the storage period, particularly the mix-based drink. The overall results showed that both products are stable enough to hypothesize their commercialization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Beverages and Novel Technologies for Their Production)
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