Special Issue "Improving Wine Quality and Safety"

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Matteo Marangon
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agronomy, Food, Natural Resources, Animals and Environment (DAFNAE), University of Padova, 35020 Legnaro, Italy
Interests: wine science and technology; wine stabilization; analytical chemistry; wine proteins; sensory analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Stamatina Kallithraka
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Agricultural University of Athens, Iera Odos 75, 11855 Athens, Greece
Interests: wine chemistry; polyphenolic compounds; astringency; sensory analysis; antioxidant activity
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The quality of food products is among the most important parameters that influence consumer choices. Today, there is an increasing demand for high-quality wines with excellent organoleptic properties. High-quality wines attract consumers’ attention, increasing at the same time their awareness and willingness to pay more.

Original and review papers dealing with improving wine quality are welcomed for inclusion in this Special Issue that will focus primarily on the following:

  • Compounds of technological importance (e.g., polyphenols, macromolecules, volatiles, etc.);
  • Development of analytical methods;
  • Microorganisms (e.g., yeast, bacteria);
  • Impact of processing techniques and additives;
  • Role of maturation and aging;
  • Sensory characteristics of the wine connected with quality;
  • Role of indigenous varieties;
  • Environmental factors that affect wine quality;
  • Impact of the climate change on wine quality parameters.

Dr. Matteo Marangon
Prof. Dr. Stamatina Kallithraka
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wine
  • processing
  • sensory
  • quality
  • Polyphenols
  • antioxidant activity
  • color
  • aroma
  • taste
  • stability
  • preservation
  • ageing
  • maturation
  • wine chemistry and analysis
  • flavor compounds

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Improving Wine Quality and Safety
Beverages 2021, 7(2), 19; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages7020019 - 16 Apr 2021
Viewed by 316
Abstract
Wine is a product that can be characterized both as a commodity but also as a luxury, depending on its price [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Wine Quality and Safety)

Research

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Open AccessArticle
Investigating How the Disclosure of Production Methods Influences Consumers’ Sensory Perceptions of Sparkling Wines
Beverages 2020, 6(4), 66; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages6040066 - 20 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 793
Abstract
The primary objective was to identify how the disclosure of production methods, including sustainable practices, would impact consumers’ sensory perceptions. The secondary objective was to identify the attributes consumers use to describe Nova Scotia (NS) sparkling wines. The first trial used projective mapping [...] Read more.
The primary objective was to identify how the disclosure of production methods, including sustainable practices, would impact consumers’ sensory perceptions. The secondary objective was to identify the attributes consumers use to describe Nova Scotia (NS) sparkling wines. The first trial used projective mapping (PM) and ultra-flash profiling (UFP) to describe eight sparkling wines (n = 77). In the second trial, a check-all-that-apply (CATA) questionnaire and 9-point hedonic scales were used (n = 101). Three sparkling wines, from the previous trial, were evaluated blinded and with a production claim. The first trial found that consumers separated the wines based on their fruit- or earth-like attributes. In the CATA trial, desirable attributes, such as sweet and smooth, were used more frequently to describe the wines with sustainable production methods. No significant differences were found in the overall liking scores after the disclosure of the production methods (α = 0.05). These findings indicate that disclosure of production methods did not impact participants’ sensory perceptions of sparkling wine. In addition, an evaluation among different generations should be considered, as millennials have been found to hold sustainable practices to greater value. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Wine Quality and Safety)
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Open AccessArticle
Authentication and Traceability Study on Barbera d’Asti and Nizza DOCG Wines: The Role of Trace- and Ultra-Trace Elements
Beverages 2020, 6(4), 63; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages6040063 - 31 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 999
Abstract
Barbera d’Asti—including Barbera d’Asti superiore—and Nizza are two DOCG (Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita) wines produced in Piemonte (Italy) from the Barbera grape variety. Differences among them arise in the production specifications in terms of purity, ageing, and zone of [...] Read more.
Barbera d’Asti—including Barbera d’Asti superiore—and Nizza are two DOCG (Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita) wines produced in Piemonte (Italy) from the Barbera grape variety. Differences among them arise in the production specifications in terms of purity, ageing, and zone of production, in particular with concern to Nizza, which follows the most stringent rules, sells at three times the average price, and is considered to have the highest market value. To guarantee producers and consumers, authentication methods must be developed in order to distinguish among the different wines. As the production zones totally overlap, it is important to verify whether the distinction is possible or not according to metals content, or whether chemical markers more linked to winemaking are needed. In this work, Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) elemental analysis and multivariate data analysis are used to study the authentication and traceability of samples from the three designations of 2015 vintage. The results show that, as far as elemental distribution in wine is concerned, work in the cellar, rather than geographic provenance, is crucial for the possibility of distinction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Wine Quality and Safety)
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Open AccessArticle
Cooling Shock for Bottled Wine. How Dramatic Is This before Tasting?
Beverages 2020, 6(4), 62; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages6040062 - 21 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 985
Abstract
Adjusting the wine temperature is a routine procedure before opening a wine bottle. In many situations wine requires quick cooling, which occasionally raises disturbing questions among consumers and wine professionals. In particular, there are certain concerns that too rapid cooling of wine for [...] Read more.
Adjusting the wine temperature is a routine procedure before opening a wine bottle. In many situations wine requires quick cooling, which occasionally raises disturbing questions among consumers and wine professionals. In particular, there are certain concerns that too rapid cooling of wine for some reasons may negatively affect its sensory characteristics and compromise the wine evaluation. To scientifically confirm of disprove this myth, we conducted a sensory analysis of six wines, cooled slowly in a refrigerator and quickly in an ice–water–salt mixture. Two sparkling wines, two white, and two red still wines with different aroma profiles were included in the research. Results of the triangle tests and 3-AFC tests demonstrated no perceivable differences between the quickly and slowly cooled wine samples. These outcomes may be useful for scientists, who perform wine sensory evaluations, as well as wine producers, experts, and the foodservice industry in general. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Wine Quality and Safety)
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Open AccessArticle
Liquid Chromatographic Approach for the Discrimination and Classification of Cava Samples Based on the Phenolic Composition Using Chemometric Methods
Beverages 2020, 6(3), 54; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages6030054 - 01 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 839
Abstract
Phenolic profiles obtained by liquid chromatography with UV/vis detection were here exploited to classify cava samples from the protected designation of origin Cava. Wine samples belonging to various classes which differed in grape varieties, blends and fermentation processes were studied based on profiling [...] Read more.
Phenolic profiles obtained by liquid chromatography with UV/vis detection were here exploited to classify cava samples from the protected designation of origin Cava. Wine samples belonging to various classes which differed in grape varieties, blends and fermentation processes were studied based on profiling and fingerprinting approaches. Hence, concentrations of relevant phenolic acids and chromatograms registered at 310 nm were preliminarily examined by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to extract information on cava classes. It was found that various hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acids such as gallic, gentisic, caffeic or caftaric acids were up- or down-expressed depending on the wine varieties. Additionally, Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) was applied to classify the cava samples according to varietal origins and blends. The classification models were established using well-known wines as the calibration standards. Subsequently, models were applied to assign unknown samples to their corresponding classes. Excellent classification rates were obtained thus proving the potentiality of the proposed approach for characterization and authentication purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Wine Quality and Safety)
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Open AccessArticle
A Digital Approach to Evaluate the Effect of Berry Cell Death on Pinot Noir Wines’ Quality Traits and Sensory Profiles Using Non-Destructive Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
Beverages 2020, 6(2), 39; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages6020039 - 09 Jun 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 820
Abstract
Berry cell death (BCD) is linked to the development of flavors and aromas in berries and wine. The BCD pattern and rate within a growing season start at around 90–100 days after anthesis (DAA), and the rate until harvest depends on environmental factors. [...] Read more.
Berry cell death (BCD) is linked to the development of flavors and aromas in berries and wine. The BCD pattern and rate within a growing season start at around 90–100 days after anthesis (DAA), and the rate until harvest depends on environmental factors. This study assessed the BCD effects on berry and wine composition from a boutique commercial vineyard in Victoria, Australia, using fluorescent imaging. Results showed differences in wine sensory profiles from the two blocks studied, mainly related to variations in BCD, due to differences in altitude between blocks. Furthermore, two machine learning (ML) models were constructed using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) measurements from full berries as inputs and living tissue (LT) and dead tissue (DT) from berries as targets (Model 1). Model 2 was developed using Brix, LT, DT from the east and west sides of canopies as inputs and using 19 sensory descriptors from wines as targets. High correlation and performances were achieved for both models without signs of overfitting (R = 0.94 and R = 0.80, respectively). These models could be used for decision-making purposes as an objective and comprehensive berry maturity assessment obtained in a non-destructive, accurate, and in a real-time fashion close to harvest, to secure specific wine styles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Wine Quality and Safety)
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Open AccessArticle
Preliminary Study of the Effects of Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) Treatments in Wines Obtained from Early-Harvested Sangiovese Grapes
Beverages 2020, 6(2), 34; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages6020034 - 18 May 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1041
Abstract
In this experiment, the effect of pulsed electric field (PEF) technology on the extractability of anthocyanins and polyphenols in early-harvested Sangiovese red grapes (16.9°Bx sugar, 3.26 pH, and 10.4 g/L titratable acidity) from Emilia Romagna (Italy) was investigated. Electric field strengths were in [...] Read more.
In this experiment, the effect of pulsed electric field (PEF) technology on the extractability of anthocyanins and polyphenols in early-harvested Sangiovese red grapes (16.9°Bx sugar, 3.26 pH, and 10.4 g/L titratable acidity) from Emilia Romagna (Italy) was investigated. Electric field strengths were in the range of 0.9–3 kV/cm, generated by the application of short, high-voltage pulses, and the grapes were subjected to specific energies from 10.4 to 32.5 kJ/kg immediately after crushing and destemming to produce a pre-fermentative pulsed electric field treatment on a pilot scale. Grape musts and wines were analyzed for color components and polyphenols content from pressing of juices up to 3 months from the end of the fermentation of wines. Furthermore, the freshly-fermented wines were subjected to accelerated aging conditions (i.e., warming under 40 °C for 32 days) to simulate the evolution of color parameters with time. The color intensity was generally higher in treated musts and wines compared to the control, further increased by raising the intensity of the electric field. Results suggested the potentialities of pulsed electric fields (PEFs) as a mild pre-fermentative process to assist maceration and to increase the polyphenolic content of musts obtained by early-harvested Sangiovese grapes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Wine Quality and Safety)
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Open AccessArticle
Copper(II) and Sulfur Dioxide in Chardonnay Juice and Shiraz Must: Impact on Volatile Aroma Compounds and Cu Forms in Wine
Beverages 2019, 5(4), 70; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages5040070 - 10 Dec 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 856
Abstract
This work outlines the influence of Cu(II) and SO2 concentrations in Chardonnay juice or Shiraz must on the respective wine composition. Analyses were conducted pre- and post-fermentation, after cold stabilization, after bentonite treatment (Chardonnay only), at bottling, and 15 months after bottling. [...] Read more.
This work outlines the influence of Cu(II) and SO2 concentrations in Chardonnay juice or Shiraz must on the respective wine composition. Analyses were conducted pre- and post-fermentation, after cold stabilization, after bentonite treatment (Chardonnay only), at bottling, and 15 months after bottling. The quantification of total Cu was conducted by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and free Cu by stripping potentiometry. Low molecular weight sulfur compounds, volatile aldehyde compounds, and general volatile compounds, including esters and terpenes, were quantified with gas-chromatography- or liquid-chromatography-QQQ-mass spectrometry. For Chardonnay, increased Cu concentration in the juice resulted in higher concentrations of Cu in the respective wine, while Shiraz wines showed no significant difference. Increased Cu addition to Chardonnay juice also produced significantly higher concentrations of H2S, 3-methylbutanal, and methional, but lower concentrations of methanethiol and phenylacetaldehyde, while SO2 addition increased 3-methylbutanal and phenylacetaldehyde, and decreased methanethiol production from post-fermentation to post-bottle aging. For the Shiraz, SO2 led to higher concentrations of H2S, and both SO2 and Cu addition increased the concentrations of hexanal, 3-methylbutanal, and phenylacetaldehyde in wine, but this effect diminished after cold stabilization. This study shows that SO2 and Cu in grape juice/must can have long-term implications for wine composition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Wine Quality and Safety)
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