Special Issue "Anti-SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 Drugs and Vaccines"

A special issue of Biologics (ISSN 2673-8449). This special issue belongs to the section "Biologics in Respiratory Diseases".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Majid Hassanzadeganroudsari
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Health and Sports, Victoria University, Melbourne, VIC 3011, Australia
Interests: vaccine development; conjugated vaccine; vaccine efficacy; drug addiction; drug delivery; nano drug delivery; nanotechnology; cancer treatment; nano-particles; nano-particulate drug delivery system

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A novel strain of coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) was first identified in late 2019 and triggered a pandemic which has been ongoing since March 2020. The pandemic has already had a serious impact on the global economy and has resulted thus far in over 2 million deaths and almost 100 million infections. The development of effective therapeutics is an urgent global priority to stop the spread of COVID-19 infections and prevent further fatalities. As such, a number of platforms such as drugs, vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, pharmacological therapy, plasma therapy, immune boosters, and alternative medicines have been explored. Researchers are fast-tracking this process, and there have already been significant developments during preclinical and clinical phases in a relatively short period. There are a number of drug candidates and vaccines developed for emergency use within a year, which is unprecedented in human history.

In this Special Issue of Biologics, the focus will be on the development of vaccines, pharmacological therapy, alternative medicines, monoclonal antibodies, plasma therapy, preclinical studies, clinical trials, replication, viral life cycle, and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2, as well as areas of identification of novel drug targets and any form of treatment models against COVID-19 infection. In vitro, in vivo, in silico, preclinical, and clinical trials are all welcome.

This Special Issue is for reviews or original research papers on biologics against the SARS-CoV-2 virus/COVID-19.

Prof. Dr. Vasso Apostolopoulos
Dr. Majid Hassanzadeganroudsari
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biologics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • vaccine
  • immunotherapies
  • novel drugs
  • pharmacological therapy
  • monoclonal antibodies
  • alternative medicine
  • naturaceuticals
  • pathogenesis

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Review

Review
Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Antiviral Drugs in the Extended Use against COVID-19: What We Know So Far
Biologics 2021, 1(2), 252-284; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biologics1020016 - 15 Sep 2021
Viewed by 535
Abstract
Human beings around the globe have been suffering from a devastating novel pandemic and public health emergency, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), for more than one and a half years due to the deadly and highly pathogenic severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection [...] Read more.
Human beings around the globe have been suffering from a devastating novel pandemic and public health emergency, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), for more than one and a half years due to the deadly and highly pathogenic severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection worldwide. Notably, no effective treatment strategy has been approved for the complete recovery of COVID-19 patients, though several vaccines have been rolled out around the world upon emergency use authorization. After the emergence of the COVID-19 outbreak globally, plenty of clinical investigations commenced to screen the safety and efficacy of several previously approved drugs to be repurposed against the SARS-CoV-2 pathogen. This concise review aims at exploring the current status of the clinical efficacy and safety profile of several antiviral medications for the treatment of patients with COVID-19 and other respiratory complications caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection. The paper covers all kinds of human studies (January 2020 to June 2021) except case reports/series to highlight the clear conclusion based on the current clinical evidence. Among the promising repositioned antivirals, remdesivir has been recommended in critical conditions to mitigate the fatality rate and improve clinical conditions. In addition, boosting the immune system is believed to be beneficial in treating COVID-19 patients, so interferon type I might exert immunomodulation through its antiviral effects by stimulating interferon-stimulated gene (ISG). However, more extensive clinical studies covering all ethnic groups globally are warranted based on current data to better understand the clinical efficacy of the currently proposed repurposed drugs against COVID-19. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 Drugs and Vaccines)
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Review
Computational Chemistry to Repurposing Drugs for the Control of COVID-19
Biologics 2021, 1(2), 111-128; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biologics1020007 - 15 Jul 2021
Viewed by 593
Abstract
Thus far, in 2021, 219 countries with over 175 million people have been infected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). SARS-CoV-2 is a positive sense, single-stranded RNA virus, and is the causal agent for coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Due to the urgency [...] Read more.
Thus far, in 2021, 219 countries with over 175 million people have been infected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). SARS-CoV-2 is a positive sense, single-stranded RNA virus, and is the causal agent for coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Due to the urgency of the situation, virtual screening as a computational modeling method offers a fast and effective modality of identifying drugs that may be effective against SARS-CoV-2. There has been an overwhelming abundance of molecular docking against SARS-CoV-2 in the last year. Due to the massive volume of computational studies, this systematic review has been created to evaluate and summarize the findings of existing studies. Herein, we report on computational articles of drugs which target, (1) viral protease, (2) Spike protein-ACE 2 interaction, (3) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and (4) other proteins and nonstructural proteins of SARS-CoV-2. Based on the studies presented, there are 55 identified natural or drug compounds with potential anti-viral activity. The next step is to show anti-viral activity in vitro and translation to determine effectiveness into human clinical trials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 Drugs and Vaccines)
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Review
Overview of COVID-19 Disease: Virology, Epidemiology, Prevention Diagnosis, Treatment, and Vaccines
Biologics 2021, 1(1), 2-40; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biologics1010002 - 12 May 2021
Viewed by 1468
Abstract
Coronaviruses belong to the “Coronaviridae family”, which causes various diseases, from the common cold to SARS and MERS. The coronavirus is naturally prevalent in mammals and birds. So far, six human-transmitted coronaviruses have been discovered. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was [...] Read more.
Coronaviruses belong to the “Coronaviridae family”, which causes various diseases, from the common cold to SARS and MERS. The coronavirus is naturally prevalent in mammals and birds. So far, six human-transmitted coronaviruses have been discovered. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was first reported in December 2019 in Wuhan, China. Common symptoms include fever, dry cough, and fatigue, but in acute cases, the disease can lead to severe shortness of breath, hypoxia, and death. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the three main transmission routes, such as droplet and contact routes, airborne transmission and fecal and oral for COVID-19, have been identified. So far, no definitive curative treatment has been discovered for COVID-19, and the available treatments are only to reduce the complications of the disease. According to the World Health Organization, preventive measures at the public health level such as quarantine of the infected person, identification and monitoring of contacts, disinfection of the environment, and personal protective equipment can significantly prevent the outbreak COVID-19. Currently, based on the urgent needs of the community to control this pandemic, the BNT162b2 (Pfizer), mRNA-1273 (Moderna), CoronaVac (Sinovac), Sputnik V (Gamaleya Research Institute, Acellena Contract Drug Research, and Development), BBIBP-CorV (Sinofarm), and AZD1222 (The University of Oxford; AstraZeneca) vaccines have received emergency vaccination licenses from health organizations in vaccine-producing countries. Vasso Apostolopoulos, Majid Hassanzadeganroudsari Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 Drugs and Vaccines)
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