Special Issue "Recent Advances in Plant Metabolomics: From Metabolic Pathways to Health Impact"

A special issue of Biology (ISSN 2079-7737).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Andreia Figueiredo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Grapevine Pathogen Systems Lab, Biosystems and Integrative Sciences Institute, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: systems biology; -omic technologies; plant–pathogen interaction; grapevine; proteases; metabolism; lipids
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Alessandra Durazzo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CREA-Research Centre for Food and Nutrition, Via Ardeatina 546, 00178 Rome, Italy
Interests: natural products; bioactive compounds; antioxidants; food quality; nutrition; food composition databases; dietary supplements; herbs; botanicals; natural substances databases; synthesis; bioavailability, metabolic pathways
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Philippe Hugueney
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Grapevine Health and Wine Quality, UMR 1131 INRAE-Université de Strasbourg, 28 rue de Herrlisheim 68000 Colmar, France
Interests: plant-specialized metabolism; plant volatiles; metabolomics; grapevine; functional genomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The current technological and analytical advances have allowed a better understanding of plant metabolism. With genomes of many plants being sequenced, functional genomics approaches demand has promoted the development of several -omic approaches, including metabolomics.

The integration of metabolomics with other -omics data, namely, transcriptomics and proteomics, through a systems biology approach provides us with a complete overview of metabolic network regulation and cellular functions. Advances in the field of metabolomics have contributed significantly toward an understanding of plant biology and identification of key processes and plant molecules that participate in several processes from plant development to plant responses to a myriad of environmental factors. These represent a promising approach for understanding plant metabolic pathways, food composition, and developing novel dietary markers. At the same time, the delination of chemistry and role and benefits of bioactive compounds in human health also should be taken into account.

This Special Issue focuses on cutting-edge knowledge on plants’ metabolism, genetic and biochemical mechanisms underlying plant growth, development, and stress responses, plant natural product chemistry and their benefits, focusing further on the contributions to this field of research. Studies of assessment of bioactive compounds and their interactions, bioavailability studies, toxicity evaluation, preclinical evaluation, and clinical are welcome. This Special Issue welcomes manuscripts addressing:

- Plant metabolomics;

- Plant natural products and bioactive compounds;

- Bioactivities and health functions;

- Biotechnology applied to metabolic pathways;

- Bioinformatic tools applied to plant metabolomics;

- Plant functional genomics applied to metabolism;

- Quality control and chemotaxonomy;

- Characterization of new metabolites and regulatory networks.

Plant-specific sample preparation, metabolomic databases, or other technical improvements are also welcome. 

Dr. Andreia Figueiredo
Dr. Alessandra Durazzo
Dr. Philippe Hugueney
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • metabolomics
  • plant metabolic pathways
  • bioactive compounds
  • natural products
  • food composition
  • bioactivities
  • health functions
  • dietary biomarkers

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Thiacloprid Induced Developmental Neurotoxicity via ROS-Oxidative Injury and Inflammation in Chicken Embryo: The Possible Attenuating Role of Chicoric and Rosmarinic Acids
Biology 2021, 10(11), 1100; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biology10111100 - 25 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 508
Abstract
Insecticides are widely employed in agriculture to control pests and as major factors for enhancing crop productivity. Thiacloprid (TH) is one of the most-used insecticides worldwide. In this study, the negative impact of TH on the brain tissue of developing chicken embryo models [...] Read more.
Insecticides are widely employed in agriculture to control pests and as major factors for enhancing crop productivity. Thiacloprid (TH) is one of the most-used insecticides worldwide. In this study, the negative impact of TH on the brain tissue of developing chicken embryo models and the modulatory effect of chicoric (CA) and rosmarinic (RA) acids were investigated. The eggs were injected in ovo with different doses of TH (0.1, 1, 10, and 100 μg/egg). TH significantly increased the oxidative damage in the brain of exposed embryos in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). TH significantly elevated the oxidative stress markers; protein carbonyl, malondialdehyde content, and DNA damage (p < 0.05). Myeloperoxidase activity and nitric oxide significantly increased with overexpression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines (interferon gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-1 beta) and stress-related and apoptotic genes (NF-KB, Caspase-3) in the brain tissue on both biochemical and molecular levels (p < 0.05), while downregulating the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2. Co-treatment of CA and RA with TH markedly decreased the insecticide-induced toxicity with a prominent synergistic effect (p < 0.05). In conclusion, TH is suggested to be a possible neurotoxic to embryos of vertebrates including human. The study also revealed the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, genoprotective, and antiapoptotic property of CA and RA against TH toxicity. Full article
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Article
Transcriptome and Metabolome Analysis Revealed the Freezing Resistance Mechanism in 60-Year-Old Overwintering Camellia sinensis
Biology 2021, 10(10), 996; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biology10100996 - 03 Oct 2021
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Abstract
Freezing stress in winter is the biggest obstacle to the survival of C. sinensis in mid-latitude and high-latitude areas, which has a great impact on the yield, quality, and even life of C. sinensis every year. In this study, transcriptome and metabolome were [...] Read more.
Freezing stress in winter is the biggest obstacle to the survival of C. sinensis in mid-latitude and high-latitude areas, which has a great impact on the yield, quality, and even life of C. sinensis every year. In this study, transcriptome and metabolome were used to clarify the freezing resistance mechanism of 60-year-old natural overwintering C. sinensis under freezing stress. Next, 3880 DEGs and 353 DAMs were obtained. The enrichment analysis showed that pathways of MAPK and ABA played a key role in the signal transduction of freezing stress, and Pyr/PYL-PP2C-SnRK2 in the ABA pathway promoted stomatal closure. Then, the water holding capacity and the freezing resistance of C. sinensis were improved. The pathway analysis showed that DEGs and DAMs were significantly enriched and up-regulated in the three-related pathways of phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, flavone and flavonol biosynthesis, and flavonoid biosynthesis. In addition, the carbohydrate and fatty acid synthesis pathways also had a significant enrichment, and the synthesis of these substances facilitated the freezing resistance. These results are of great significance to elucidate the freezing resistance mechanism and the freezing resistance breeding of C. sinensis. Full article
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Article
Metabolomic Profiling and Antioxidant Activity of Fruits Representing Diverse Apple and Pear Cultivars
Biology 2021, 10(5), 380; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biology10050380 - 28 Apr 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 772
Abstract
The false fruits of apple (Malus domestica) and pear (Pyrus communis) are consumed all over the world, contributing to the dietary intake of health-promoting antioxidant phytochemicals. For example, polyphenols confer many beneficial effects (according to their chemical structure, bioavailability, [...] Read more.
The false fruits of apple (Malus domestica) and pear (Pyrus communis) are consumed all over the world, contributing to the dietary intake of health-promoting antioxidant phytochemicals. For example, polyphenols confer many beneficial effects (according to their chemical structure, bioavailability, and absorption efficiency in the gut) and the consumption of polyphenol-rich apple and pear fruits may therefore reduce the risk of some diseases. However, the content of such molecules is highly dependent on the specific fruit cultivar. To examine this metabolic diversity in detail, we used metabolomic analysis (NMR and HPLC-DAD/MS) to profile the metabolome of six apple and five pear cultivars. We also determined the antioxidant capacity of the extracts (FRAP assay) and correlated this with the metabolomic composition and abundance of specific metabolites. We observed the cultivar-specific accumulation of sugars, amino acids, malic acid, and various polyphenols, which was also related to the growing season for some cultivars. We found that the ancient Italian apple Pom Prussian was enriched for chlorogenic acid as well as more characteristic polyphenols (phloretin derivatives), the pear cultivar Abate Fetel was low in sucrose, and both cultivars displayed high in vitro antioxidant activity. These cultivars may, therefore, be particularly attractive to health-conscious consumers. Full article
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Review

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Review
Promoting Human Nutrition and Health through Plant Metabolomics: Current Status and Challenges
Biology 2021, 10(1), 20; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biology10010020 - 31 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2971
Abstract
Plant metabolomics plays important roles in both basic and applied studies regarding all aspects of plant development and stress responses. With the improvement of living standards, people need high quality and safe food supplies. Thus, understanding the pathways involved in the biosynthesis of [...] Read more.
Plant metabolomics plays important roles in both basic and applied studies regarding all aspects of plant development and stress responses. With the improvement of living standards, people need high quality and safe food supplies. Thus, understanding the pathways involved in the biosynthesis of nutritionally and healthily associated metabolites in plants and the responses to plant-derived biohazards in humans is of equal importance to meet people’s needs. For each, metabolomics has a vital role to play, which is discussed in detail in this review. In addition, the core elements of plant metabolomics are highlighted, researches on metabolomics-based crop improvement for nutrition and safety are summarized, metabolomics studies on plant natural products including traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for health promotion are briefly presented. Challenges are discussed and future perspectives of metabolomics as one of the most important tools to promote human nutrition and health are proposed. Full article
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