Special Issue "Biomolecules and Cancer Prevention"

A special issue of Biomolecules (ISSN 2218-273X). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 October 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Shih-Min Hsia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan
Interests: effect of natural products on female disorders such as PCOS; leiomyoma; endometriosis; dysmenorrhea; breast cancer; endometrial cancer and ovary cancer
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cancer exhibits different hallmarks, such as anti-apoptosis, proliferation, resistance to cell death, angiogenesis, invasion, migration, and metastasis. Globally, cancer remains a major issue in human health. How to prevent or treat different cancers is very important. Increasing data highlight the role of biomolecules, including miRNA, long non-coding RNAs, peptides, polysaccharides (from marine systems or plants), and natural products (polyphenols, flavonoids, or anthocyanidins), in the prevention or treatment of different cancers.

This Special Issue of Biomolecules, titled “Biomolecules and Cancer Prevention”, welcomes the submission of manuscripts in the form of either original research or review articles on functional biomolecules, such as miRNA, long non-coding RNAs, peptides, polysaccharides, and natural products, to provide a better understanding of the effects of different kinds of biomolecules on the molecular mechanisms of cancer prevention and treatment, including preclinical and clinical studies.

Prof. Shih-Min Hsia
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Cancer prevention
  • miRNA
  • long non-coding RNAs
  • polysaccharide
  • natural products
  • peptide
  • polyphenol
  • flavonoid

Published Papers (13 papers)

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Research

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Article
Targeting the Id1-Kif11 Axis in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Using Combination Therapy
Biomolecules 2020, 10(9), 1295; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biom10091295 - 08 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1462
Abstract
The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors inhibitor of differentiation 1 (Id1) and inhibitor of differentiation 3 (Id3) (referred to as Id) have an important role in maintaining the cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotype in the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype. [...] Read more.
The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors inhibitor of differentiation 1 (Id1) and inhibitor of differentiation 3 (Id3) (referred to as Id) have an important role in maintaining the cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotype in the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype. In this study, we aimed to understand the molecular mechanism underlying Id control of CSC phenotype and exploit it for therapeutic purposes. We used two different TNBC tumor models marked by either Id depletion or Id1 expression in order to identify Id targets using a combinatorial analysis of RNA sequencing and microarray data. Phenotypically, Id protein depletion leads to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase, which we demonstrate is reversible. In order to understand the molecular underpinning of Id proteins on the cell cycle phenotype, we carried out a large-scale small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen of 61 putative targets identified by using genomic analysis of two Id TNBC tumor models. Kinesin Family Member 11 (Kif11) and Aurora Kinase A (Aurka), which are critical cell cycle regulators, were further validated as Id targets. Interestingly, unlike in Id depletion conditions, Kif11 and Aurka knockdown leads to a G2/M arrest, suggesting a novel Id cell cycle mechanism, which we will explore in further studies. Therapeutic targeting of Kif11 to block the Id1–Kif11 axis was carried out using small molecular inhibitor ispinesib. We finally leveraged our findings to target the Id/Kif11 pathway using the small molecule inhibitor ispinesib in the Id+ CSC results combined with chemotherapy for better response in TNBC subtypes. This work opens up exciting new possibilities of targeting Id targets such as Kif11 in the TNBC subtype, which is currently refractory to chemotherapy. Targeting the Id1–Kif11 molecular pathway in the Id1+ CSCs in combination with chemotherapy and small molecular inhibitor results in more effective debulking of TNBC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomolecules and Cancer Prevention)
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Article
The Phytochemical Indicaxanthin Synergistically Enhances Cisplatin-Induced Apoptosis in HeLa Cells via Oxidative Stress-Dependent p53/p21waf1 Axis
Biomolecules 2020, 10(7), 994; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biom10070994 - 02 Jul 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1269
Abstract
Combining phytochemicals with chemotherapics is an emerging strategy to treat cancer to overcome drug toxicity and resistance with natural compounds. We assessed the effects of indicaxanthin (Ind), a pigment obtained from Opuntia ficus-indica (L. Mill) fruit, combined with cisplatin (CDDP) against cervical cancer [...] Read more.
Combining phytochemicals with chemotherapics is an emerging strategy to treat cancer to overcome drug toxicity and resistance with natural compounds. We assessed the effects of indicaxanthin (Ind), a pigment obtained from Opuntia ficus-indica (L. Mill) fruit, combined with cisplatin (CDDP) against cervical cancer cells (HeLa). Measured cell viability via Trypan blue assay; cell morphology via fluorescence microscopy; apoptosis, cell cycle, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and cell redox balance via flow-cytometry; expression levels of apoptosis-related proteins via western blot. Cell viability assays and Chou-Talalay plot demonstrated that the combination of CDDP and Ind had synergistic cytotoxic effects. Combined treatment had significant effects (p < 0.05) on phosphatidylserine externalization, cell morphological changes, cell cycle arrest, fall in MMP, ROS production and GSH decay compared with the individual treatment groups. Bax, cytochrome c, p53 and p21waf1 were over-expressed, while Bcl-2 was downregulated. Pre-treatment with N-acetyl-l-cysteine abolished the observed synergistic effects. We also demonstrated potentiation of CDDP anticancer activity by nutritionally relevant concentrations of Ind. Oxidative stress-dependent mitochondrial cell death is the basis of the chemosensitizing effect of Ind combined with CDDP against HeLa cancer cells. ROS act as upstream signaling molecules to initiate apoptosis via p53/p21waf1 axis. Ind can be a phytochemical of interest in combo-therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomolecules and Cancer Prevention)
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Article
Pterostilbene Enhances Cytotoxicity and Chemosensitivity in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells
Biomolecules 2020, 10(5), 709; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biom10050709 - 04 May 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1295
Abstract
Gemcitabine (GEM) drug resistance causes high mortality rates and poor outcomes in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) involvement in the GEM resistance process has been demonstrated. Therefore, finding a safe and effective way to inhibit receptors [...] Read more.
Gemcitabine (GEM) drug resistance causes high mortality rates and poor outcomes in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) involvement in the GEM resistance process has been demonstrated. Therefore, finding a safe and effective way to inhibit receptors for RAGE-initiated GEM resistance is urgent. Pterostilbene (PTE), a natural methoxylated analogue derived from resveratrol and found in grapes and blueberries, has diverse bioactivities, such as antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer qualities. The overall research objective was to determine the potential of PTE to enhance tumor cytotoxicity and chemosensitivity in PDAC cells. Our results have demonstrated that PTE induced S-phase cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and autophagic cell death and inhibited multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1) expression by downregulating RAGE/PI3K/Akt signaling in both MIA PaCa-2 and MIA PaCa-2 GEMR cells (GEM-resistant cells). Remarkably, convincing evidence was established by RAGE small interfering RNA transfection. Taken together, our study demonstrated that PTE promoted chemosensitivity by inhibiting cell proliferation and MDR1 expression via the RAGE/PI3K/Akt axis in PDAC cells. The observations in these experiments indicate that PTE may play a crucial role in MDR1 modulation for PDAC treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomolecules and Cancer Prevention)
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Article
Beta-Tocotrienol Exhibits More Cytotoxic Effects than Gamma-Tocotrienol on Breast Cancer Cells by Promoting Apoptosis via a P53-Independent PI3-Kinase Dependent Pathway
Biomolecules 2020, 10(4), 577; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biom10040577 - 09 Apr 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1852
Abstract
Studies on tocotrienols have progressively revealed the benefits of these vitamin E isoforms on human health. Beta-tocotrienol (beta-T3) is known to be less available in nature compared to other vitamin E members, which may explain the restricted number of studies on beta-T3. In [...] Read more.
Studies on tocotrienols have progressively revealed the benefits of these vitamin E isoforms on human health. Beta-tocotrienol (beta-T3) is known to be less available in nature compared to other vitamin E members, which may explain the restricted number of studies on beta-T3. In the present study, we aim to investigate the anti-proliferative effects and the pro-apoptotic mechanisms of beta-T3 on two human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF7. To assess cell viability, both cell lines were incubated for 24 and 48 h, with different concentrations of beta-T3 and gamma-T3, the latter being a widely studied vitamin E isoform with potent anti-cancerous properties. Cell cycle progression and apoptosis induction upon treatment with various concentrations of the beta-T3 isoform were assessed. The effect of beta-T3 on the expression level of several apoptosis-related proteins p53, cytochrome C, cleaved-PARP-1, Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase-3, in addition to key cell survival proteins p-PI3K and p-GSK-3 α/β was determined using western blot analysis. Beta-tocotrienol exhibited a significantly more potent anti-proliferative effect than gamma-tocotrienol on both cell lines regardless of their hormonal receptor status. Beta-T3 induced a mild G1 arrest on both cell lines, and triggered a mitochondrial stress-mediated apoptotic response in MDA-MB-231 cells. Mechanistically, beta-T3′s anti-neoplastic activity involved the downregulation of phosphorylated PI3K and GSK-3 cell survival proteins. These findings suggest that vitamin E beta-T3 should be considered as a promising anti-cancer agent, more effective than gamma-T3 for treating human breast cancer and deserves to be further studied to investigate its effects in vitro and on other cancer types. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomolecules and Cancer Prevention)
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Article
Machilin D, a Lignin Derived from Saururus chinensis, Suppresses Breast Cancer Stem Cells and Inhibits NF-κB Signaling
Biomolecules 2020, 10(2), 245; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biom10020245 - 05 Feb 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1382
Abstract
Cancer stem cells are responsible for breast cancer initiation, metastasis, and relapse. Targeting breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) using phytochemicals is a good strategy for the treatment of cancer. A silica gel, a reversed-phase C18 column (ODS), a Sephadex LH-20 gel, thin layer [...] Read more.
Cancer stem cells are responsible for breast cancer initiation, metastasis, and relapse. Targeting breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) using phytochemicals is a good strategy for the treatment of cancer. A silica gel, a reversed-phase C18 column (ODS), a Sephadex LH-20 gel, thin layer chromatography, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were used for compound isolation from Saururus chinensis extracts. The isolated compound was identified as machilin D by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Machilin D inhibited the growth and mammosphere formation of breast cancer cells and inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model. Machilin D reduced the proportions of CD44+/CD24- and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1)-positive cells. Furthermore, this compound reduced the nuclear localization of the NF-κB protein and decreased the IL-6 and IL-8 secretion in mammospheres. These results suggest that machilin D blocks IL-6 and IL-8 signaling and induces CSC death and thus may be a potential agent targeting BCSCs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomolecules and Cancer Prevention)
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Article
Suppression of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Progression through FOXM1 and EMT Inhibition via Hydroxygenkwanin-Induced miR-320a Expression
Biomolecules 2020, 10(1), 20; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biom10010020 - 21 Dec 2019
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 1282
Abstract
Daphne genkwa, a Chinese medicinal herb, is used frequently in Southeast Asian countries to treat diseases; the flavonoid hydroxygenkwanin (HGK) is extracted from its flower buds. The bioactivity of HGK, particularly as an anti-liver cancer agent, has not been explored. In this [...] Read more.
Daphne genkwa, a Chinese medicinal herb, is used frequently in Southeast Asian countries to treat diseases; the flavonoid hydroxygenkwanin (HGK) is extracted from its flower buds. The bioactivity of HGK, particularly as an anti-liver cancer agent, has not been explored. In this study, human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines and an animal xenograft model were employed to investigate both the activity of HGK against liver cancer and its cellular signaling mechanisms. HCC cells treated with HGK were subjected to cell function assays. Whole transcriptome sequencing was used to identify genes whose expression was influenced by HGK, and the flavonoid’s cancer suppression mechanisms were further investigated through gain- and loss-of-function assays. Finally, in vitro findings were tested in a mouse xenograft model. The data showed that HGK induced the expression of the microRNA miR-320a, which in turn inhibited the expression of the transcription factor ‘forkhead box protein M1’ (FOXM1) and downstream FOXM1-regulated proteins related to epithelial–mesenchymal transition, thereby leading to the suppression of liver cancer cell growth and invasion. Significant inhibition of tumor growth was also observed in HGK-treated mice. Hence, the present study demonstrated the activity of HGK against liver cancer and validated its potential use as a therapeutic agent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomolecules and Cancer Prevention)
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Review

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Review
Mangiferin as New Potential Anti-Cancer Agent and Mangiferin-Integrated Polymer Systems—A Novel Research Direction
Biomolecules 2021, 11(1), 79; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biom11010079 - 09 Jan 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1347
Abstract
For a long time, the pharmaceutical industry focused on natural biologically active molecules due to their unique properties, availability and significantly less side-effects. Mangiferin is a naturally occurring C-glucosylxantone that has substantial potential for the treatment of various diseases thanks to its numerous [...] Read more.
For a long time, the pharmaceutical industry focused on natural biologically active molecules due to their unique properties, availability and significantly less side-effects. Mangiferin is a naturally occurring C-glucosylxantone that has substantial potential for the treatment of various diseases thanks to its numerous biological activities. Many research studies have proven that mangiferin possesses antioxidant, anti-infection, anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, cardiovascular, neuroprotective properties and it also increases immunity. It is especially important that it has no toxicity. However, mangiferin is not being currently applied to clinical use because its oral bioavailability as well as its absorption in the body are too low. To improve the solubility, enhance the biological action and bioavailability, mangiferin integrated polymer systems have been developed. In this paper, we review molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer action as well as a number of designed polymer-mangiferin systems. Taking together, mangiferin is a very promising anti-cancer molecule with excellent properties and the absence of toxicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomolecules and Cancer Prevention)
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Review
Curcumin against Prostate Cancer: Current Evidence
Biomolecules 2020, 10(11), 1536; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biom10111536 - 10 Nov 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1775
Abstract
Cancer is a condition characterized by remarkably enhanced rates of cell proliferation paired with evasion of cell death. These deregulated cellular processes take place following genetic mutations leading to the activation of oncogenes, the loss of tumor suppressor genes, and the disruption of [...] Read more.
Cancer is a condition characterized by remarkably enhanced rates of cell proliferation paired with evasion of cell death. These deregulated cellular processes take place following genetic mutations leading to the activation of oncogenes, the loss of tumor suppressor genes, and the disruption of key signaling pathways that control and promote homeostasis. Plant extracts and plant-derived compounds have historically been utilized as medicinal remedies in different cultures due to their anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial properties. Many chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of cancer are derived from plants, and the scientific interest in discovering plant-derived chemicals with anticancer potential continues today. Curcumin, a turmeric-derived polyphenol, has been reported to possess antiproliferative and proapoptotic properties. In the present review, we summarize all the in vitro and in vivo studies examining the effects of curcumin in prostate cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomolecules and Cancer Prevention)
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Review
Protective Effects of Epigallocatechin Gallate (EGCG) on Endometrial, Breast, and Ovarian Cancers
Biomolecules 2020, 10(11), 1481; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biom10111481 - 25 Oct 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1386
Abstract
Green tea and its major bioactive component, (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), possess diverse biological properties, particularly antiproliferation, antimetastasis, and apoptosis induction. Many studies have widely investigated the anticancer and synergistic effects of EGCG due to the side effects of conventional cytotoxic agents. This review [...] Read more.
Green tea and its major bioactive component, (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), possess diverse biological properties, particularly antiproliferation, antimetastasis, and apoptosis induction. Many studies have widely investigated the anticancer and synergistic effects of EGCG due to the side effects of conventional cytotoxic agents. This review summarizes recent knowledge of underlying mechanisms of EGCG on protective roles for endometrial, breast, and ovarian cancers based on both in vitro and in vivo animal studies. EGCG has the ability to regulate many pathways, including the activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and protection against epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). EGCG has also been found to interact with DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs), which affect epigenetic modifications. Finally, the action of EGCG may exert a suppressive effect on gynecological cancers and have beneficial effects on auxiliary therapies for known drugs. Thus, future clinical intervention studies with EGCG will be necessary to more and clear evidence for the benefit to these cancers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomolecules and Cancer Prevention)
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Review
Curcumin’s Beneficial Effects on Neuroblastoma: Mechanisms, Challenges, and Potential Solutions
Biomolecules 2020, 10(11), 1469; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biom10111469 - 22 Oct 2020
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 1279
Abstract
Curcumin, a natural polyphenolic compound derived from the South Asian turmeric plant (Curcuma longa), has well-characterized antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-protein-aggregate, and anticancer properties. Neuroblastoma (NB) is a cancer of the nervous system that arises primarily in pediatric patients. In order to reduce [...] Read more.
Curcumin, a natural polyphenolic compound derived from the South Asian turmeric plant (Curcuma longa), has well-characterized antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-protein-aggregate, and anticancer properties. Neuroblastoma (NB) is a cancer of the nervous system that arises primarily in pediatric patients. In order to reduce the multiple disadvantages and side effects of conventional oncologic modalities and to potentially overcome cancer drug resistance, natural substances such as curcumin are examined as complementary and supportive therapies against NB. In NB cell lines, curcumin by itself promotes apoptosis and cell cycle arrest through the suppression of serine–threonine kinase Akt and nuclear factor kappa of activated B-cells (NF-κB) signaling, induction of mitochondrial dysfunction, and upregulation of p53 and caspase signaling. While curcumin demonstrates anti-NB efficacy in vitro, cross-validation between NB cell types is currently lacking for many of its specific mechanistic activities. Furthermore, curcumin’s low bioavailability by oral administration, poor absorption, and relative insolubility in water pose challenges to its clinical introduction. Numerous curcumin formulations, including nanoparticles, nanocarriers, and microemulsions, have been developed, with these having some success in the treatment of NB. In the future, standardization and further basic and preclinical trials will be required to ensure the safety of curcumin formulations. While the administration of curcumin is clinically safe even at high doses, clinical trials are necessary to substantiate the practical efficacy of curcumin in the prevention and treatment of NB. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomolecules and Cancer Prevention)
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Review
The Cancer Chemopreventive and Therapeutic Potential of Tetrahydrocurcumin
Biomolecules 2020, 10(6), 831; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biom10060831 - 29 May 2020
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 1243
Abstract
In recent decades, cancer has been one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Despite advances in understanding the molecular basis of tumorigenesis, diagnosis, and clinical therapies, the discovery and development of effective drugs is an active and vital field in cancer research. [...] Read more.
In recent decades, cancer has been one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Despite advances in understanding the molecular basis of tumorigenesis, diagnosis, and clinical therapies, the discovery and development of effective drugs is an active and vital field in cancer research. Tetrahydrocurcumin is a major curcuminoid metabolite of curcumin, naturally occurring in turmeric. The interest in tetrahydrocurcumin research is increasing because it is superior to curcumin in its solubility in water, chemical stability, bioavailability, and anti-oxidative activity. Many in vitro and in vivo studies have revealed that tetrahydrocurcumin exerts anti-cancer effects through various mechanisms, including modulation of oxidative stress, xenobiotic detoxification, inflammation, proliferation, metastasis, programmed cell death, and immunity. Despite the pharmacological similarities between tetrahydrocurcumin and curcumin, the structure of tetrahydrocurcumin determines its distinct and specific molecular mechanism, thus making it a potential candidate for the prevention and treatment of cancers. However, the utility of tetrahydrocurcumin is yet to be evaluated as only limited pharmacokinetic and oral bioavailability studies have been performed. This review summarizes research on the anti-cancer properties of tetrahydrocurcumin and describes its mechanisms of action. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomolecules and Cancer Prevention)
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Review
Lactoferrin’s Anti-Cancer Properties: Safety, Selectivity, and Wide Range of Action
Biomolecules 2020, 10(3), 456; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biom10030456 - 15 Mar 2020
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 1896
Abstract
Despite recent advances in cancer therapy, current treatments, including radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy, although beneficial, present attendant side effects and long-term sequelae, usually more or less affecting quality of life of the patients. Indeed, except for most of the immunotherapeutic agents, the complete [...] Read more.
Despite recent advances in cancer therapy, current treatments, including radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy, although beneficial, present attendant side effects and long-term sequelae, usually more or less affecting quality of life of the patients. Indeed, except for most of the immunotherapeutic agents, the complete lack of selectivity between normal and cancer cells for radio- and chemotherapy can make them potential antagonists of the host anti-cancer self-defense over time. Recently, the use of nutraceuticals as natural compounds corroborating anti-cancer standard therapy is emerging as a promising tool for their relative abundance, bioavailability, safety, low-cost effectiveness, and immuno-compatibility with the host. In this review, we outlined the anti-cancer properties of Lactoferrin (Lf), an iron-binding glycoprotein of the innate immune defense. Lf shows high bioavailability after oral administration, high selectivity toward cancer cells, and a wide range of molecular targets controlling tumor proliferation, survival, migration, invasion, and metastasization. Of note, Lf is able to promote or inhibit cell proliferation and migration depending on whether it acts upon normal or cancerous cells, respectively. Importantly, Lf administration is highly tolerated and does not present significant adverse effects. Moreover, Lf can prevent development or inhibit cancer growth by boosting adaptive immune response. Finally, Lf was recently found to be an ideal carrier for chemotherapeutics, even for the treatment of brain tumors due to its ability to cross the blood–brain barrier, thus globally appearing as a promising tool for cancer prevention and treatment, especially in combination therapies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomolecules and Cancer Prevention)
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Review
Bioactive Compounds: Natural Defense Against Cancer?
Biomolecules 2019, 9(12), 758; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biom9120758 - 21 Nov 2019
Cited by 33 | Viewed by 2034
Abstract
Cancer is a devastating disease that has claimed many lives. Natural bioactive agents from plants are gaining wide attention for their anticancer activities. Several studies have found that natural plant-based bioactive compounds can enhance the efficacy of chemotherapy, and in some cases ameliorate [...] Read more.
Cancer is a devastating disease that has claimed many lives. Natural bioactive agents from plants are gaining wide attention for their anticancer activities. Several studies have found that natural plant-based bioactive compounds can enhance the efficacy of chemotherapy, and in some cases ameliorate some of the side-effects of drugs used as chemotherapeutic agents. In this paper, we have reviewed the literature on the anticancer effects of four plant-based bioactive compounds namely, curcumin, myricetin, geraniin and tocotrienols (T3) to provide an overview on some of the key findings that are related to this effect. The molecular mechanisms through which the active compounds may exert their anticancer properties in cell and animal-based studies also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomolecules and Cancer Prevention)
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