Special Issue "Biomolecules and Materials from Agro-Industrial Wastes"

A special issue of Biomolecules (ISSN 2218-273X). This special issue belongs to the section "Biological and Bio- Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Valdir Florencio Da Veiga Junior
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto Militar de Engenharia, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Interests: green extraction; alternative solvents; innovative technologies; original procedures; microwave; ultrasound; intensification
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Farid Chemat
grade E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Université d´Avignon et des Pays du Vaucluse, 84029 Avignon, France
Interests: green extraction; alternative solvents; innovative technologies; original procedures; microwave; ultrasound; intensification
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Tom Dugmore
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Lecturer at University of York Green Chemistry Centre of Excellence, York, UK
Interests: green extraction; alternative solvents; innovative technologies; original procedures; microwave; ultrasound; intensification
Dr. José Otávio Carréra Silva Júnior
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Associate Professor at Pará Federal University Research and Development of Innovative Cosmetic Formulations Using Vegetable Oils from the Amazon Region, Belém, Pará, Brazil
Interests: green extraction; alternative solvents; innovative technologies; original procedures; microwave; ultrasound; intensification
Dr. Jackson Guedes
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Associate Professor at Vale do São Francisco Federal University Phytochemistry Research from Brazilian Biomes of Cerrado and Caatinga, Petrolina, Pernambuco, Brazil
Interests: green extraction; alternative solvents; innovative technologies; original procedures; microwave; ultrasound; intensification

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Green and sustainable chemistry is a very hot topic for those that study biomass all over the world. Biomass-based resources are being increasingly seen, from a biorefinery perspective, to be required to utilise each plant part, rather than be grown for a single purpose. Extracting bioactive, functional or energy-dense molecules from the residues of agricultural processes allows for increased sustainability of the supply chain and enhances the bioeconomy.

This Special Issue aims to collect original papers and/or review papers dealing with complementary and alternative approaches to the study of molecules and materials from biomass and their application in several fields, from bioenergy to green extraction methodologies.

Dr. Valdir Florencio Da Veiga Junior
Prof. Dr. Farid Chemat
Dr. Tom Dugmore
Dr. José Otávio Carréra Silva Júnior
Dr. Jackson Guedes
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomolecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Bioactive molecules from discarded plant parts
  • New extraction methodologies
  • Green solvents
  • Green chemistry
  • Bioenergy
  • Biorefinery
  • Biofibres

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Amazonian Bacuri (Platonia insignis Mart.) Fruit Waste Valorisation Using Response Surface Methodology
Biomolecules 2021, 11(12), 1767; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biom11121767 - 25 Nov 2021
Viewed by 157
Abstract
Bacuri (Platonia insignis Mart) is a species from the Clusiaceae genus. Its fruit pulp is commonly used in South America in several food products, such as beverages, ice cream and candies. Only the pulp of the fruit is used, and the peels [...] Read more.
Bacuri (Platonia insignis Mart) is a species from the Clusiaceae genus. Its fruit pulp is commonly used in South America in several food products, such as beverages, ice cream and candies. Only the pulp of the fruit is used, and the peels and seeds are considered waste from these industries. As a trioxygenated xanthone source, this species is of high interest for bioproduct development. This work evaluated the mesocarp and epicarp of bacuri fruits through different extraction methods and experimental conditions (pH, temperature and solvent) in order to determine the most effective method for converting this agro-industrial waste in a value-added bioproduct. Open-column procedures and HPLC and NMR experiments were performed to evaluate the chemical composition of the extracts, along with total phenols, total flavonoids and antioxidant activities (sequestration of the DPPH and ABTS radicals). A factorial design and response surface methodology were used. The best extraction conditions of substances with antioxidant properties were maceration at 50 °C with 100% ethanol as solvent for mesocarp extracts, and acidic sonication in 100% ethanol for epicarp extracts, with an excellent phenolic profile and antioxidant capacities. The main compounds isolated were the prenylated benzophenones garcinielliptone FC (epicarp) and 30-epi-cambogin (mesocarp). This is the first study analysing the performance of extraction methods within bacuri agro-industrial waste. Results demonstrated that shells and seeds of bacuri can be used as phenolic-rich bioproducts obtained by a simple extraction method, increasing the value chain of this fruit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomolecules and Materials from Agro-Industrial Wastes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Skimmed Goat’s Milk Powder Enriched with Grape Pomace Seed Extract: Phenolics and Protein Characterization and Antioxidant Properties
Biomolecules 2021, 11(7), 965; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biom11070965 - 30 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 727
Abstract
The aim of this research was phenolics and protein characterization and antioxidant properties evaluation of skimmed thermally treated goat’s milk powder enriched with different concentration of grape pomace seed extract (SE). The dominant phenolics in SE were phenolic acids, flavan–3-ols and procyanidins. Different [...] Read more.
The aim of this research was phenolics and protein characterization and antioxidant properties evaluation of skimmed thermally treated goat’s milk powder enriched with different concentration of grape pomace seed extract (SE). The dominant phenolics in SE were phenolic acids, flavan–3-ols and procyanidins. Different electrophoretic techniques together with UHPLC-MS/MS analysis revealed the presence of phenolics-protein interactions in the samples, mainly procyanidins with whey protein/caseins complexes. Addition of SE into thermally treated goat’s milk significantly improved antioxidant properties of goat’s milk such as TAC, FRP, DPPH and ABTS•+ scavenging activity. Gallic acid, catechin, and procyanidins mostly contributed to these activities. The schematic representation of phenolics–casein micelles interactions in thermally treated goat’s milk enriched with SE was given. The addition of SE into thermally treated goat’s milk can be a promising strategy in food waste recovery and to enhance the beneficial health effects of goat’s milk-based functional foods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomolecules and Materials from Agro-Industrial Wastes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Green Extraction by Ultrasound, Microencapsulation by Spray Drying and Antioxidant Activity of the Tucuma Coproduct (Astrocaryum vulgare Mart.) Almonds
Biomolecules 2021, 11(4), 545; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biom11040545 - 08 Apr 2021
Viewed by 727
Abstract
The industrial processing amazon fruits, like tucuma, generates a large amount of coproducts with large nutritional potential. Thus, this work obtained the oily extract of the tucuma almonds coproducts by green extraction using palm oil by the ultrasound method and then microencapsulated by [...] Read more.
The industrial processing amazon fruits, like tucuma, generates a large amount of coproducts with large nutritional potential. Thus, this work obtained the oily extract of the tucuma almonds coproducts by green extraction using palm oil by the ultrasound method and then microencapsulated by atomization and verification of its antioxidant activity. Thermogravimetric techniques, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, moisture content, water activity were applied to characterize the microparticles. Total carotenoids were determined by UV spectroscopy and antioxidant activity was measured by 2,2′-azino-di-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline sulfonic acid and co-oxidation in the system β-carotene/linoleic acid. The oily extract and microparticle had total carotenoid contents of 3.305 mg/100 g ± 0.01 and 2.559 mg/100 g ± 0.01, respectively. The antioxidant activity assessed through the 2,2′-azino-di-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline sulfonic acid value was 584.75 μM/trolox ± 0.01 (oily extract) and 537.12 μM/trolox ± 0.01 (microparticle) were determined. In the system β-carotene/linoleic acid showed oxidation of 49.9% ± 1.8 lipophilic extract and 43.3% ± 2.3 microparticle. The results showed that the oily extract of the tucuma almond coproduct can be used as a carotenoid-rich source and microencapsuled with possible application for functional foods production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomolecules and Materials from Agro-Industrial Wastes)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Xylan Decomposition in Plant Cell Walls as an Inducer of Surfactin Synthesis by Bacillus subtilis
Biomolecules 2021, 11(2), 239; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biom11020239 - 08 Feb 2021
Viewed by 1134
Abstract
Hemicellulose is the second most abundant plant heterogenous biopolymer. Among products obtained from a wide range of agro-residues, biosurfactants, e.g., surfactin (SU), are gaining increasing interest. Our previous studies have shown that a Bacillus subtilis strain can successfully produce a significant amount of [...] Read more.
Hemicellulose is the second most abundant plant heterogenous biopolymer. Among products obtained from a wide range of agro-residues, biosurfactants, e.g., surfactin (SU), are gaining increasing interest. Our previous studies have shown that a Bacillus subtilis strain can successfully produce a significant amount of SU using a rapeseed cake. This work aimed to investigate plant hemicellulose components as substrates promoting SU’s efficient production by B. subtilis 87Y. Analyses of SU production, enzymatic activity and cell wall composition of hulled oat caryopses suggest that the main ingredients of plant hemicellulose, in particular xylan and its derivatives, may be responsible for an increased biosurfactant yield. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomolecules and Materials from Agro-Industrial Wastes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Chitosan as a Valuable Biomolecule from Seafood Industry Waste in the Design of Green Food Packaging
Biomolecules 2021, 11(11), 1599; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biom11111599 - 28 Oct 2021
Viewed by 504
Abstract
Chitosan is a versatile biomolecule with a broad range of applications in food and pharmaceutical products. It can be obtained by the alkaline deacetylation of chitin. This biomolecule can be extracted using conventional or green methods from seafood industry residues, e.g., shrimp shells. [...] Read more.
Chitosan is a versatile biomolecule with a broad range of applications in food and pharmaceutical products. It can be obtained by the alkaline deacetylation of chitin. This biomolecule can be extracted using conventional or green methods from seafood industry residues, e.g., shrimp shells. Chitin has limited applications because of its low solubility in organic solvents. Chitosan is soluble in acidified solutions allowing its application in the food industry. Furthermore, biological properties, such as antioxidant, antimicrobial, as well as its biodegradability, biocompatibility and nontoxicity have contributed to its increasing application as active food packaging. Nevertheless, some physical and mechanical features have limited a broader range of applications of chitosan-based films. Green approaches may be used to address these limitations, leading to well-designed chitosan-based food packaging, by employing principles of a circular and sustainable economy. In this review, we summarize the properties of chitosan and present a novel green technology as an alternative to conventional chitin extraction and to design environmentally friendly food packaging based on chitosan. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomolecules and Materials from Agro-Industrial Wastes)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review
Brewer’s Spent Grains—Valuable Beer Industry By-Product
Biomolecules 2020, 10(12), 1669; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biom10121669 - 13 Dec 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1579
Abstract
The brewing sector is a significant part of the global food industry. Breweries produce large quantities of wastes, including wastewater and brewer’s spent grains. Currently, upcycling of food industry by-products is one of the principles of the circular economy. The aim of this [...] Read more.
The brewing sector is a significant part of the global food industry. Breweries produce large quantities of wastes, including wastewater and brewer’s spent grains. Currently, upcycling of food industry by-products is one of the principles of the circular economy. The aim of this review is to present possible ways to utilize common solid by-product from the brewing sector. Brewer’s spent grains (BSG) is a good material for sorption and processing into activated carbon. Another way to utilize spent grains is to use them as a fuel in raw form, after hydrothermal carbonization or as a feedstock for anaerobic digestion. The mentioned by-products may also be utilized in animal and human nutrition. Moreover, BSG is a waste rich in various substances that may be extracted for further utilization. It is likely that, in upcoming years, brewer’s spent grains will not be considered as a by-product, but as a desirable raw material for various branches of industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomolecules and Materials from Agro-Industrial Wastes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop