Special Issue "State-of-the-Art Electrochemical Biosensors in Water and Environmental Monitoring"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensor and Bioelectronic Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Wei Zhang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea SA1 8EN, UK
Interests: biosensor; electrochemical; water quality; nanoelectronics; environment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Despina Moschou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering, Centre for Biosensors, Bioelectronics and Biodevices (C3Bio), Centre for Therapeutic Innovation Electronics Materials, Circuits & Systems Research Unit (EMaCS), University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, UK
Interests: Lab-on-Chip devices for biomedical diagnostics; bioMEMs low-cost integration technologies; electrochemical biosensors; printed bioelectronics; large area electronics
Dr. Changseok Han
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Engineering, INHA University, Incheon 22212, Korea
Interests: advanced oxidation processes; photocatalysis; toxins; contaminants of emerging concern; nutrients recovery; water treatment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, rapid research and development in device miniaturization and microfabrication technology has led to the sensitive and selective electrochemical sensor devices for in situ water and environmental monitoring. These sensor systems have attracted a great deal of attention and discussions in the scientific community, industry, and governmental agencies, since they can perform automated in situ analysis in complex matrices and provide rapid, reliable and inexpensive measurements of key chemical and physical parameters, including a variety of inorganic and organic contaminants. The continuous improvement of these sensors systems will significantly increase sensitivity and selectivity for specific pollutants with low concentration and reduce monitoring costs, as well as potentially transform the future of water and environmental monitoring practice around the world. This special issue seeks to address latest and important advances in design factors and development issues of electrochemical sensors for water and environmental monitoring purposes, including analytical improvements (e.g. detection limits), miniaturization, device/system microfabrication and potential for remote communication (e.g. wireless connection and user friendliness).

Dr. Changseok Han
Dr. Wei Zhang
Dr. Despina Moschou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Electrochemical
  • Miniaturization
  • Microfabrication
  • Rapid sensing
  • Nanosensors
  • Water monitoring
  • Environmental monitoring
  • Emergent pollutants
  • Remote sensing
  • Internet of things

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Simultaneous Detection of Dihydroxybenzene Isomers Using Electrochemically Reduced Graphene Oxide-Carboxylated Carbon Nanotubes/Gold Nanoparticles Nanocomposite
Biosensors 2021, 11(9), 321; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios11090321 - 07 Sep 2021
Viewed by 445
Abstract
An electrochemical sensor based on electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ErGO), carboxylated carbon nanotubes (cMWCNT), and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) (GCE/ErGO-cMWCNT/AuNPs) was developed for the simultaneous detection of dihidroxybenzen isomers (DHB) hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (CC), and resorcinol (RS) using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The fabrication [...] Read more.
An electrochemical sensor based on electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ErGO), carboxylated carbon nanotubes (cMWCNT), and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) (GCE/ErGO-cMWCNT/AuNPs) was developed for the simultaneous detection of dihidroxybenzen isomers (DHB) hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (CC), and resorcinol (RS) using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The fabrication and optimization of the system were evaluated with Raman Spectroscopy, SEM, cyclic voltammetry, and DPV. Under optimized conditions, the GCE/ErGO-cMWCNT/AuNPs sensor exhibited a linear concentration range of 1.2–170 μM for HQ and CC, and 2.4–400 μM for RS with a detection limit of 0.39 μM, 0.54 μM, and 0.61 μM, respectively. When evaluated in tap water and skin-lightening cream, DHB multianalyte detection showed an average recovery rate of 107.11% and 102.56%, respectively. The performance was attributed to the synergistic effects of the 3D network formed by the strong π–π stacking interaction between ErGO and cMWCNT, combined with the active catalytic sites of AuNPs. Additionally, the cMWCNT provided improved electrocatalytic properties associated with the carboxyl groups that facilitate the adsorption of the DHB and the greater amount of active edge planes. The proposed GCE/ErGO-cMWCNT/AuNPs sensor showed a great potential for the simultaneous, precise, and easy-to-handle detection of DHB in complex samples with high sensitivity. Full article
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Article
MoS2/PPy Nanocomposite as a Transducer for Electrochemical Aptasensor of Ampicillin in River Water
Biosensors 2021, 11(9), 311; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios11090311 - 01 Sep 2021
Viewed by 689
Abstract
We report the design of an electrochemical aptasensor for ampicillin detection, which is an antibiotic widely used in agriculture and considered to be a water contaminant. We studied the transducing potential of nanostructure composed of MoS2 nanosheets and conductive polypyrrole nanoparticles (PPyNPs) cast [...] Read more.
We report the design of an electrochemical aptasensor for ampicillin detection, which is an antibiotic widely used in agriculture and considered to be a water contaminant. We studied the transducing potential of nanostructure composed of MoS2 nanosheets and conductive polypyrrole nanoparticles (PPyNPs) cast on a screen-printed electrode. Fine chemistry is developed to build the biosensors entirely based on robust covalent immobilizations of naphthoquinone as a redox marker and the aptamer. The structural and morphological properties of the nanocomposite were studied by SEM, AFM, and FT-IR. High-resolution XPS measurements demonstrated the formation of a binding between the two nanomaterials and energy transfer affording the formation of heterostructure. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to analyze their electrocatalytic properties. We demonstrated that the nanocomposite formed with PPyNPs and MoS2 nanosheets has electro-catalytic properties and conductivity leading to a synergetic effect on the electrochemical redox process of the redox marker. Thus, a highly sensitive redox process was obtained that could follow the recognition process between the apatamer and the target. An amperometric variation of the naphthoquinone response was obtained regarding the ampicillin concentration with a limit of detection (LOD) of 10 pg/L (0.28 pM). A high selectivity towards other contaminants was demonstrated with this biosensor and the analysis of real river water samples without any treatment showed good recovery results thanks to the antifouling properties. This biosensor can be considered a promising device for the detection of antibiotics in the environment as a point-of-use system. Full article
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Article
Synthesis of Bamboo-like Multiwall Carbon Nanotube–Poly(Acrylic Acid-co-Itaconic Acid)/NaOH Composite Hydrogel and its Potential Application for Electrochemical Detection of Cadmium(II)
Biosensors 2020, 10(10), 147; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios10100147 - 19 Oct 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 985
Abstract
A poly(acrylic acid-co-itaconic acid) (PAA-co-IA)/NaOH hydrogel containing bamboo-type multiwall carbon nanotubes (B-MWCNTs) doped with nitrogen (PAA-co-IA/NaOH/B-MWCNTs) was synthesized and characterized by SEM, absorption of water, point of zero charges, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry. The possible use of the PAA-co-IA/NaOH/B-MWCNT [...] Read more.
A poly(acrylic acid-co-itaconic acid) (PAA-co-IA)/NaOH hydrogel containing bamboo-type multiwall carbon nanotubes (B-MWCNTs) doped with nitrogen (PAA-co-IA/NaOH/B-MWCNTs) was synthesized and characterized by SEM, absorption of water, point of zero charges, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry. The possible use of the PAA-co-IA/NaOH/B-MWCNT hydrogel as an electrode modifier and pre-concentrator agent for Cd(II) sensing purposes was then evaluated using carbon paste electrodes via differential pulse voltammetry. The presence of the B-MWCNTs in the hydrogel matrix decreased its degree of swelling, stabilized the structure of the swollen gel, and favored the detection of 3 ppb Cd(II), which is comparable to the World Health Organization’s allowable maximum value in drinking water. A calibration curve was obtained in the concentration range of 2.67 × 10−8 to 6.23 × 10−7 M (i.e., 3 and 70 ppb) to determine a limit of detection (LOD) of 19.24 μgL−1 and a sensitivity of 0.15 μC ppb−1. Also, the Zn(II), Hg(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions interfered moderately on the determination of Cd(II). Full article
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