Special Issue "Application of CRISPR Cas Systems for Biosensing"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensor and Bioelectronic Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Chung-Chiun Liu
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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Electronics Design Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
Interests: electrochemical-based chemical and bio-sensors; microfabrication technology; nano-catalysts and sensing meterials; CRISPR-related biosensing strategy; bio-conjugation technology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Yifan Dai
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
Interests: DNA biotechnology; electrochemical biosensing strategies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are announcing a Special Issue on “Application of CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) Cas Systems for Biosensing”. CRISPR, a powerful gene-editing tool, has demonstrated its capability as a powerful recognition element in biosensing. Owing to the high specificity and modularity of CRISPR Cas systems, CRISPR-based biosensing systems have shown promising accuracy and sensitivity for the detection of nucleic acids. The utilization of CRISPR for both electrochemical biosensors and optical biosensors highlights the importance of multi-disciplinary contributions to sensing science as an imminent biosensing area. For this Special Issue, we invite research with different modalities to describe different perspectives on CRISPR-based biosensing systems. Specifically, the following issues are of scientific interest to this Special Issue: the methods of integrating CRISPR into various biosensing systems; the role of CRISPR Cas systems in the design of biosensing strategies; and the difference between conventional nucleic acid probe-based recognition elements and CRISPR-based recognition elements. Contributed manuscripts will be peer-reviewed by well-qualified reviewers, and a rapid decision on the status of the manuscript will be made by the Editorial Board of Biosensors based on the results of the review.

We invite you to submit your manuscript(s) to this Special Issue on the Application of CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) Cas Systems for Biosensing. The deadline for submission to this Special Issue is December 31, 2020.

Prof. Dr. Chung Chiun Liu
Dr. Yifan Dai
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
CRISPR/Cas12a-Based Ultrasensitive and Rapid Detection of JAK2 V617F Somatic Mutation in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms
Biosensors 2021, 11(8), 247; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios11080247 - 24 Jul 2021
Viewed by 493
Abstract
The JAK2 V617F mutation is a major diagnostic, therapeutic, and monitoring molecular target of Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). To date, numerous methods of detecting the JAK2 V617F mutation have been reported, but there is no gold-standard diagnostic method for clinical applications. Here, [...] Read more.
The JAK2 V617F mutation is a major diagnostic, therapeutic, and monitoring molecular target of Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). To date, numerous methods of detecting the JAK2 V617F mutation have been reported, but there is no gold-standard diagnostic method for clinical applications. Here, we developed and validated an efficient Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR associated protein 12a (Cas12a)-based assay to detect the JAK2 V617F mutation. Our results showed that the sensitivity of the JAK2 V617F/Cas12a fluorescence detection system was as high as 0.01%, and the JAK2 V617F/Cas12a lateral flow strip assay could unambiguously detect as low as 0.5% of the JAK2 V617F mutation, which was much higher than the sensitivity required for clinical application. The minimum detectable concentration of genomic DNA achieved was 0.01 ng/μL (~5 aM, ~3 copies/μL). In addition, the whole process only took about 1.5 h, and the cost of an individual test was much lower than that of the current assays. Thus, our methods can be applied to detect the JAK2 V617F mutation, and they are highly sensitive, rapid, cost-effective, and convenient. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of CRISPR Cas Systems for Biosensing)
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Article
Cas12a and Lateral Flow Strip-Based Test for Rapid and Ultrasensitive Detection of Spinal Muscular Atrophy
Biosensors 2021, 11(5), 154; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios11050154 - 14 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 959
Abstract
Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by severe lethality and irreversible progression. Early diagnosis of SMA is of more practical significance with the emergence of effective therapy. However, existing techniques to identify SMA patients rely on cumbersome instruments, hindering their accessibility and application. [...] Read more.
Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by severe lethality and irreversible progression. Early diagnosis of SMA is of more practical significance with the emergence of effective therapy. However, existing techniques to identify SMA patients rely on cumbersome instruments, hindering their accessibility and application. An SMA-Cas12a-strip assay was developed with the integration of Cas12a-based nucleic acid detection, isothermal amplification, and lateral flow strip. The analytical performance of the assay was assessed with clinical samples. To explore its extensible utility, various specimens were tested. Validated with 168 clinical samples, the sensitivity and specificity of the SMA-Cas12a-strip assay were both 100%. The minimum detectable concentration of genomic DNA containing the target gene achieved 526 aM. The assay was compatible with specimens from several sources, and the turnaround time could be within 1.5 h. We developed a simple, cost-effective, and highly sensitive and specific assay to detect SMA patients. With little and field-portable equipment, the assay holds great promise in the detection of SMA patients, particularly in low-resource regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of CRISPR Cas Systems for Biosensing)
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Communication
Detection of CRISPR-Cas9-Mediated Mutations Using a Carbon Nanotube-Modified Electrochemical Genosensor
Biosensors 2021, 11(1), 17; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios11010017 - 08 Jan 2021
Viewed by 2042
Abstract
The CRISPR-Cas9 system has facilitated the genetic modification of various model organisms and cell lines. The outcomes of any CRISPR-Cas9 assay should be investigated to ensure/improve the precision of genome engineering. In this study, carbon nanotube-modified disposable pencil graphite electrodes (CNT/PGEs) were used [...] Read more.
The CRISPR-Cas9 system has facilitated the genetic modification of various model organisms and cell lines. The outcomes of any CRISPR-Cas9 assay should be investigated to ensure/improve the precision of genome engineering. In this study, carbon nanotube-modified disposable pencil graphite electrodes (CNT/PGEs) were used to develop a label-free electrochemical nanogenosensor for the detection of point mutations generated in the genome by using the CRISPR-Cas9 system. Carbodiimide chemistry was used to immobilize the 5′-aminohexyl-linked inosine-substituted probe on the surface of the sensor. After hybridization between the target sequence and probe at the sensor surface, guanine oxidation signals were monitored using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Optimization of the sensitivity of the nanogenoassay resulted in a lower detection limit of 213.7 nM. The nanogenosensor was highly specific for the detection of the precisely edited DNA sequence. This method allows for a rapid and easy investigation of the products of CRISPR-based gene editing and can be further developed to an array system for multiplex detection of different-gene editing outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of CRISPR Cas Systems for Biosensing)
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