Special Issue "The Application of Biosensors in Environmental Survey and Energy Production"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensor and Bioelectronic Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Ying-Chien Chung
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biological Science and Technology, China University of Science and Technology, Taipei 11581, Taiwan
Interests: environmental biotechnology; applied microbiology; biosensor; biological engineering; bioremediation; microbial fuel cell; waste conversion; environmental engineering with applications in wastewater treatment; wastegas treatment by biofilter; composting technique; the study in chitosan science; photocatalysis technique; the measurement and reduction of greenhouse gases; adsorption technique
Prof. Dr. Chih-Yu Chen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Tourism and Leisure, Hsing Wu University, Taipei 24452, Taiwan
Interests: bioenergy production; bioelectricity; environmental microorganisms; environmental biotechnology and biochemical engineering; wastewater treatment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The fast growth of world energy consumption, environmental pollution, and waste discharge require sustainable energy production and waste recovery technology. The molecular and bioelectrochemical techniques for quantitative detection of microorganisms or power generation have been available for environmental survey. In recent years, many new molecular techniques, e.g., quantitative PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), have been developed intensively. This Special Issue, entitled “The Application of Biosensors in Environmental Survey and Energy Production”, was proposed for the international journal Biosensors, which is an SCI journal (2019 IF = 3.240). This Special Issue mainly covers original research which relates to the above mentioned topic, including bioelectricity generation, microbial electrochemistry, environmental survey, and molecular techniques. Papers selected for this Special Issue are subject to a peer review procedure with the aim of rapid and wide dissemination of research results. The Special Issue aims to focus on the recent development of biosensing strategies applied to environmental survey and energy production research. Furthermore, the Special Issue provides an overview on recent achievements and stimulates ideas about the current and future research in the biosensors field. Both original papers and review articles are welcome. I look forward to receiving your outstanding research outcomes.

Prof. Dr. Ying-Chien Chung
Prof. Dr. Chih-Yu Chen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microbial fuel cell system
  • bioelectricity generation
  • environmental waste treatment
  • environmental survey
  • useful resource recovery
  • molecular techniques
  • fluorescence in situ hybridization
  • multiple applications

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Highly Sensitive Luminescent Bioassay Using Recombinant Escherichia coli Biosensor for Rapid Detection of Low Cr(VI) Concentration in Environmental Water
Biosensors 2021, 11(10), 357; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios11100357 - 27 Sep 2021
Viewed by 404
Abstract
In this study, we constructed a recombinant Escherichia coli strain with different promoters inserted between the chromate-sensing regulator chrB and the reporter gene luxAB to sense low hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) concentrations (<0.05 mg/L); subsequently, its biosensor characteristics (sensitivity, selectivity, and specificity) for measuring [...] Read more.
In this study, we constructed a recombinant Escherichia coli strain with different promoters inserted between the chromate-sensing regulator chrB and the reporter gene luxAB to sense low hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) concentrations (<0.05 mg/L); subsequently, its biosensor characteristics (sensitivity, selectivity, and specificity) for measuring Cr(VI) in various water bodies were evaluated. The luminescence intensity of each biosensor depended on pH, temperature, detection time, coexisting carbon source, coexisting ion, Cr(VI) oxyanion form, Cr(VI) concentration, cell type, and type of medium. Recombinant lux-expressing E. coli with the T7 promoter (T7-lux-E. coli, limit of detection (LOD) = 0.0005 mg/L) had the highest luminescence intensity or was the most sensitive for Cr(VI) detection, followed by E. coli with the T3 promoter (T3-lux-E. coli, LOD = 0.001 mg/L) and that with the SP6 promoter (SP6-lux-E. coli, LOD = 0.005 mg/L). All biosensors could be used to determine whether the Cr(VI) standard was met in terms of water quality, even when using thawing frozen cells as biosensors after 90-day cryogenic storage. The SP6-lux-E. coli biosensor had the shortest detection time (0.5 h) and the highest adaptability to environmental interference. The T7-lux-E. coli biosensor—with the optimal LOD, a wide measurement range (0.0005–0.5 mg/L), and low deviation (−5.0–7.9%) in detecting Cr(VI) from industrial effluents, domestic effluents, and surface water—is an efficient Cr(VI) biosensor. This unprecedented study is to evaluate recombinant lux E. coli with dissimilar promoters for their possible practice in Cr(VI) measurement in water bodies, and the biosensor performance is clearly superior to that of past systems in terms of detection time, LOD, and detection deviation for real water samples. Full article
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Article
Development of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization as a Rapid, Accurate Method for Detecting Coliforms in Water Samples
Biosensors 2021, 11(1), 8; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios11010008 - 24 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 984
Abstract
Coliform bacteria are indicators of water quality; however, most detection methods for coliform bacteria are time-consuming and nonspecific. Here, we developed a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) approach to detect four types of coliform bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter aerogenes [...] Read more.
Coliform bacteria are indicators of water quality; however, most detection methods for coliform bacteria are time-consuming and nonspecific. Here, we developed a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) approach to detect four types of coliform bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Citrobacter freundii, simultaneously in water samples using specific probes for 16S rRNA. This FISH method was applied to detect coliform bacteria in simulated water and domestic wastewater samples and compared with traditional detection methods (e.g., plate counting, multiple-tube fermentation (MTF) technique, and membrane filter (MF) technique). Optimal FISH conditions for detecting the four types of coliforms were found to be fixation in 3% paraformaldehyde at 4 °C for 2 h and hybridization at 50 °C for 1.5 h. By comparing FISH with plate counting, MTF, MF, and a commercial detection kit, we found that FISH had the shortest detection time and highest accuracy for the identification of coliform bacteria in simulated water and domestic wastewater samples. Moreover, the developed method could simultaneously detect individual species and concentrations of coliform bacteria. Overall, our findings indicated that FISH could be used as a rapid, accurate biosensor system for simultaneously detecting four types of coliform bacteria to ensure water safety. Full article
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