Special Issue "Biosensors for Body Fluid Analysis"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensor and Bioelectronic Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Esther Serrano-Pertierra
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Analytical and Physical Chemistry, University of Oviedo, 33003 Oviedo, Spain
Interests: extracellular vesicles; enrichment; ultracentrifugation; nanoparticle tracking analysis; lateral flow immunoassay
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am pleased to introduce this Special Issue focused on biosensors for the analysis of different body fluids.

Biosensors are becoming an important avenue of biomedical research. From a simple thermometer, aimed to detect changes in body temperature, to the development of the first glucometer in 1962, these fascinating devices have gradually been incorporated into clinical practice.

Biosensors are generally small, fast, selective, sensitive, and easy-to-use devices. Their use may speed up test results, allowing early clinical decisions to be taken and benefit the patient. A person’s health status can be continuously monitored (e.g., blood oxygen monitors). Other biosensors are so common that they are used at home, such as the pregnancy test or the aforementioned glucometer.

In places where health facilities are not easily accessible, the introduction of rapid tests becomes even more relevant. Simple tests to detect infectious diseases such as HIV or HVC can make a great difference. In addition, coupling new technologies to biosensors would make health tests more affordable and portable.

In this Special Issue, we aim to gather the most recent research in the field of biosensors that may directly be applied to biofluids (saliva, urine, synovial fluid, cerebrospinal fluid, etc.) without sample pretreatment.

Dr. Esther Serrano-Pertierra
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biosensors
  • body fluids
  • point of care
  • saliva
  • cerebrospinal fluid
  • plasma
  • serum
  • urine
  • synovial fluid

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Alginate Bead Biosystem for the Determination of Lactate in Sweat Using Image Analysis
Biosensors 2021, 11(10), 379; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios11100379 - 09 Oct 2021
Viewed by 214
Abstract
Lactate is present in sweat at high concentrations, being a metabolite of high interest in sport science and medicine. Therefore, the potential to determine lactate concentrations in physiological fluids, at the point of need with minimal invasiveness, is very valuable. In this work, [...] Read more.
Lactate is present in sweat at high concentrations, being a metabolite of high interest in sport science and medicine. Therefore, the potential to determine lactate concentrations in physiological fluids, at the point of need with minimal invasiveness, is very valuable. In this work, the synthesis and performance of an alginate bead biosystem was investigated. Artificial sweat with different lactate concentrations was used as a proof of concept. The lactate detection was based on a colorimetric assay and an image analysis method using lactate oxidase, horseradish peroxidase and tetramethyl benzidine as the reaction mix. Lactate in artificial sweat was detected with a R² = 0.9907 in a linear range from 10 mM to 100 mM, with a limit of detection of 6.4 mM and a limit of quantification of 21.2 mM. Real sweat samples were used as a proof of concept to test the performance of the biosystem, obtaining a lactate concentration of 48 ± 3 mM. This novel sensing configuration, using alginate beads, gives a fast and reliable method for lactate sensing, which could be integrated into more complex analytical systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors for Body Fluid Analysis)
Article
A CRISPR/Cas12a Based Universal Lateral Flow Biosensor for the Sensitive and Specific Detection of African Swine-Fever Viruses in Whole Blood
Biosensors 2020, 10(12), 203; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios10120203 - 10 Dec 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1270
Abstract
Cross-border pathogens such as the African swine fever virus (ASFV) still pose a socio-economic threat. Cheaper, faster, and accurate diagnostics are imperative for healthcare and food safety applications. Currently, the discovery of the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) has paved the [...] Read more.
Cross-border pathogens such as the African swine fever virus (ASFV) still pose a socio-economic threat. Cheaper, faster, and accurate diagnostics are imperative for healthcare and food safety applications. Currently, the discovery of the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) has paved the way for the diagnostics based on Cas13 and Cas12/14 that exhibit collateral cleavage of target and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) reporter. The reporter is fluorescently labeled to report the presence of a target. These methods are powerful; however, fluorescence-based approaches require expensive apparatuses, complicate results readout, and exhibit high-fluorescence background. Here, we present a new CRISPR–Cas-based approach that combines polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, Cas12a, and a probe-based lateral flow biosensor (LFB) for the simultaneous detection of seven types of ASFV. In the presence of ASFVs, the LFB responded to reporter trans-cleavage by naked eyes and achieved a sensitivity of 2.5 × 10−15 M within 2 h, and unambiguously identified ASFV from swine blood. This system uses less time for PCR pre-amplification and requires cheaper devices; thus, it can be applied to virus monitoring and food samples detection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors for Body Fluid Analysis)
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