Special Issue "Advance Nanomaterials for Biosensors"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensor Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 August 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Sadanand Pandey
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Science, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 38541, Korea
Interests: nanomaterials; nanosensors; chemical sensor; catalysts; wastewater treatment
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanotechnology has a significant impact on everything in our daily life. Nanomaterial-enabled sensors are being designed for highly sensitive and selective, fast response, inexpensive, and large-scale production with great reliability, multiplex-functionality, and high-flexibility sensing applications. High demand for the production of rapid sensors for a wide range of applications, namely health diagnostics, medical engineering, environmental analysis, food safety/quality control, and detection of toxic metabolites are of increasing interest for researchers worldwide. The use of nanomaterials in biosensors is very promising because they mediate current flow. Surface modification of the electrodes, based on various novel nanomaterials (such as carbon nanomaterials, metal nanoparticles, nanofibers, nanowires, and nanotubes, etc.), significantly increases the performance of the biosensors. Chemical stability, high current density, and complex surface chemistry result in desirable properties in nanomaterials for developing such sensors. Ultimately, this implementation will enhance the sensor sensitivity and stability.

We are initiating a "Call for Papers" for researchers who are interested in presenting new research work on advanced nanomaterial-based biosensors, particularly in the areas of new approaches of synthesizing, characterizing, and modifying nanomaterials for detecting analytes of interest in environmental and medical sciences. Such excellent works on Advanced Nanomaterials for Biosensors deserve high visibility and their presentation in open access journals, such as Biosensors, MDPI. This Special Issue will include high-quality articles by internationally recognized scholars.

We are inviting short communication, research, and review articles covering (but not limited to) the following topics:

  • New modification processes of nanomaterials in developing biosensors
  • Fabrication of carbon nanomaterial-based biosensors that include graphene, graphite, carbon nanotubes, quantum dots, diamond, and boron-doped diamond, dendrimers, polymers, and conducting polymers.
  • CNT-based biosensors
  • Graphene-based biosensors
  • Development of quantum dot-based biosensors
  • Current advances in semiconductor nanomaterial‐based biosensor
  • Characterization of sensing properties of biosensor
  • Designing new biosensing devices with improved performances for emerging applications
  • Techniques used to impart specificity of the various types of biosensors
  • DNA functionalization of gold and graphene nanomaterials
  • Nanomaterial-based sensors for environmental detection
  • Nanomaterial-based sensors for in vivo and in vitro applications
  • Viruses detection such as coronavirus using biosensor

Dr. Sadanand Pandey
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanotechnology
  • Advanced nanomaterials
  • Nanosensors
  • Gold nanoparticle
  • Carbon nanotubes
  • Graphene
  • Quantum dots
  • Magnetic nanoparticles
  • Molecular detection
  • Optical biosensors
  • Electrochemical biosensors
  • DNA biosensors
  • Immunosensors
  • Enzyme biosensors
  • Biomedical diagnostics
  • Real-time analysis
  • Environmental monitoring
  • Sensor performance
  • Sensitivity
  • Surface chemistry
  • Selectivity
  • Sensing mechanism
  • Challenges and future prospects

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Communication
An Exonuclease I-Aided Turn-Off Fluorescent Strategy for Alkaline Phosphatase Assay Based on Terminal Protection and Copper Nanoparticles
Biosensors 2021, 11(5), 139; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios11050139 - 29 Apr 2021
Viewed by 552
Abstract
As an important DNA 3′-phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase can repair damaged DNA caused by replication and recombination. It is essential to measure the level of alkaline phosphatase to indicate some potential diseases, such as cancer, related to alkaline phosphatase. Here, we designed a simple [...] Read more.
As an important DNA 3′-phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase can repair damaged DNA caused by replication and recombination. It is essential to measure the level of alkaline phosphatase to indicate some potential diseases, such as cancer, related to alkaline phosphatase. Here, we designed a simple and fast method to detect alkaline phosphatase quantitively. When alkaline phosphatase is present, the resulting poly T-DNA with a 3′-hydroxyl end was cleaved by exonuclease I, prohibiting the formation of fluorescent copper nanoparticles. However, the fluorescent copper nanoparticles can be monitored with the absence of alkaline phosphatase. Hence, we can detect alkaline phosphatase with this turn-off strategy. The proposed method is able to quantify the concentration of alkaline phosphatase with the LOD of 0.0098 U/L. Furthermore, we utilized this method to measure the effects of inhibitor Na3VO4 on alkaline phosphatase. In addition, it was successfully applied to quantify the level of alkaline phosphatase in human serum. The proposed strategy is sensitive, selective, cost effective, and timesaving, having a great potential to detect alkaline phosphatase quantitatively in clinical diagnosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance Nanomaterials for Biosensors)
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Review

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Review
Recent Advances in Electrochemical Biosensors: Applications, Challenges, and Future Scope
Biosensors 2021, 11(9), 336; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios11090336 - 14 Sep 2021
Viewed by 175
Abstract
The electrochemical biosensors are a class of biosensors which convert biological information such as analyte concentration that is a biological recognition element (biochemical receptor) into current or voltage. Electrochemical biosensors depict propitious diagnostic technology which can detect biomarkers in body fluids such as [...] Read more.
The electrochemical biosensors are a class of biosensors which convert biological information such as analyte concentration that is a biological recognition element (biochemical receptor) into current or voltage. Electrochemical biosensors depict propitious diagnostic technology which can detect biomarkers in body fluids such as sweat, blood, feces, or urine. Combinations of suitable immobilization techniques with effective transducers give rise to an efficient biosensor. They have been employed in the food industry, medical sciences, defense, studying plant biology, etc. While sensing complex structures and entities, a large data is obtained, and it becomes difficult to manually interpret all the data. Machine learning helps in interpreting large sensing data. In the case of biosensors, the presence of impurity affects the performance of the sensor and machine learning helps in removing signals obtained from the contaminants to obtain a high sensitivity. In this review, we discuss different types of biosensors along with their applications and the benefits of machine learning. This is followed by a discussion on the challenges, missing gaps in the knowledge, and solutions in the field of electrochemical biosensors. This review aims to serve as a valuable resource for scientists and engineers entering the interdisciplinary field of electrochemical biosensors. Furthermore, this review provides insight into the type of electrochemical biosensors, their applications, the importance of machine learning (ML) in biosensing, and challenges and future outlook. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance Nanomaterials for Biosensors)
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Review
Multi-Functionalized Nanomaterials and Nanoparticles for Diagnosis and Treatment of Retinoblastoma
Biosensors 2021, 11(4), 97; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios11040097 - 26 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1281
Abstract
Retinoblastoma is a rare type of cancer, and its treatment, as well as diagnosis, is challenging, owing to mutations in the tumor-suppressor genes and lack of targeted, efficient, cost-effective therapy, exhibiting a significant need for novel approaches to address these concerns. For this [...] Read more.
Retinoblastoma is a rare type of cancer, and its treatment, as well as diagnosis, is challenging, owing to mutations in the tumor-suppressor genes and lack of targeted, efficient, cost-effective therapy, exhibiting a significant need for novel approaches to address these concerns. For this purpose, nanotechnology has revolutionized the field of medicine with versatile potential capabilities for both the diagnosis, as well as the treatment, of retinoblastoma via the targeted and controlled delivery of anticancer drugs via binding to the overexpressed retinoblastoma gene. Nanotechnology has also generated massive advancements in the treatment of retinoblastoma based on the use of surface-tailored multi-functionalized nanocarriers; overexpressed receptor-based nanocarriers ligands (folate, galactose, and hyaluronic acid); lipid-based nanocarriers; and metallic nanocarriers. These nanocarriers seem to benchmark in mitigating a plethora of malignant retinoblastoma via targeted delivery at a specified site, resulting in programmed apoptosis in cancer cells. The effectiveness of these nanoplatforms in diagnosing and treating intraocular cancers such as retinoblastoma has not been properly discussed, despite the increasing significance of nanomedicine in cancer management. This article reviewed the recent milestones and future development areas in the field of intraocular drug delivery and diagnostic platforms focused on nanotechnology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance Nanomaterials for Biosensors)
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Review
Recent Advances in Nanotechnology-Based Diagnosis and Treatments of Human Osteosarcoma
Biosensors 2021, 11(2), 55; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios11020055 - 20 Feb 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1563
Abstract
Osteosarcoma (OSA) is a type of bone cancer that begins in the cells that form bones. OSA is a rare mesenchymal bone neoplasm derived from mesenchymal stem cells. Genome disorganization, chromosomal modifications, deregulation of tumor suppressor genes, and DNA repair defects are the [...] Read more.
Osteosarcoma (OSA) is a type of bone cancer that begins in the cells that form bones. OSA is a rare mesenchymal bone neoplasm derived from mesenchymal stem cells. Genome disorganization, chromosomal modifications, deregulation of tumor suppressor genes, and DNA repair defects are the factors most responsible for OSA development. Despite significant advances in the diagnosing and treatment of OSA, patients’ overall survival has not improved within the last twenty years. Lately, advances in modern nanotechnology have spurred development in OSA management and offered several advantages to overcome the drawbacks of conventional therapies. This technology has allowed the practical design of nanoscale devices combined with numerous functional molecules, including tumor-specific ligands, antibodies, anti-cancer drugs, and imaging probes. Thanks to their small sizes, desirable drug encapsulation efficiency, and good bioavailability, functionalized nanomaterials have found wide-spread applications for combating OSA progression. This review invokes the possible utility of engineered nanomaterials in OSA diagnosis and treatment, motivating the researchers to seek new strategies for tackling the challenges associated with it. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance Nanomaterials for Biosensors)
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Review
Progress of Advanced Nanomaterials in the Non-Enzymatic Electrochemical Sensing of Glucose and H2O2
Biosensors 2020, 10(11), 151; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios10110151 - 22 Oct 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1279
Abstract
Non-enzymatic sensing has been in the research limelight, and most sensors based on nanomaterials are designed to detect single analytes. The simultaneous detection of analytes that together exist in biological organisms necessitates the development of effective and efficient non-enzymatic electrodes in sensing. In [...] Read more.
Non-enzymatic sensing has been in the research limelight, and most sensors based on nanomaterials are designed to detect single analytes. The simultaneous detection of analytes that together exist in biological organisms necessitates the development of effective and efficient non-enzymatic electrodes in sensing. In this regard, the development of sensing elements for detecting glucose and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is significant. Non-enzymatic sensing is more economical and has a longer lifetime than enzymatic electrochemical sensing, but it has several drawbacks, such as high working potential, slow electrode kinetics, poisoning from intermediate species and weak sensing parameters. We comprehensively review the recent developments in non-enzymatic glucose and H2O2 (NEGH) sensing by focusing mainly on the sensing performance, electro catalytic mechanism, morphology and design of electrode materials. Various types of nanomaterials with metal/metal oxides and hybrid metallic nanocomposites are discussed. A comparison of glucose and H2O2 sensing parameters using the same electrode materials is outlined to predict the efficient sensing performance of advanced nanomaterials. Recent innovative approaches to improve the NEGH sensitivity, selectivity and stability in real-time applications are critically discussed, which have not been sufficiently addressed in the previous reviews. Finally, the challenges, future trends, and prospects associated with advanced nanomaterials for NEGH sensing are considered. We believe this article will help to understand the selection of advanced materials for dual/multi non-enzymatic sensing issues and will also be beneficial for researchers to make breakthrough progress in the area of non-enzymatic sensing of dual/multi biomolecules. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance Nanomaterials for Biosensors)
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