Special Issue "Microfluidic Bio-Sensors and Their Applications"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensor and Bioelectronic Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 June 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Krishna Kant
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centro De Investigaciones Biomédicas (CINBIO), Universidade de Vigo, 36310 Vigo, Spain
Interests: microfluidic sensing; electrochemical bio-sensing; point-of-care diagnostics; precision diagnostics; plasmonic sensing; microfluidic devices; lab-on-chip
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The integration of microfluidics and sensing technology is a rapidly developing field with major applications towards diagnostic devices, including rapid detection for food safety, chemical and biological research, medical diagnostics, and environmental monitoring. This Special Issue is dedicated to covering innovations over a variety of topics in this area, from sensing to manufacturing and integration methods to novel microfluidic-based sensors for biological application. Articles reporting on the latest developments in multiplexed sensors and other types of sensor integrated with microfluidics are of interest, including electrochemical, optical, magnetic, and other transduction types.

I am very pleased to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue on “Microfluidic Bio-Sensors and Their Applications”, which are emerging research subjects with various applications. The scope of the journal is wide on biosensing, including but not limited to the following areas:

  • Lab-on-a-chip and other biochips and microarray systems;
  • Novel microfluidic based biosensing concepts, mechanisms, and detection principles;
  • 3D printed microfluidic and biosensing devices;
  • Development of biosensor methodologies and applications;
  • Fabrication technology of chip-based detection devices;
  • Scaffold based biomimetic systems and microfluidic devices for biosensing application;
  • Biological and chemical actuators, including smart materials and microfluidic components;
  • Biophotonic sensors and chemical sensing systems.

Research articles and detailed comprehensive review reports on recent development in the field as well as achievements and new fabrication technologies claimed to be relevant to biosensing and actuation will be considered for publication. This Special Issue is addressed at biologists, microfluidic experts, 3D bio printing and cell culture experts, etc.

Dr. Krishna Kant
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Point-of-care (PoC)
  • Diagnostics
  • Molecular imprinted polymer biosensing
  • Multiplexed biosensing
  • Bio-inspired materials
  • Cell and tissue sensors
  • 3D printing
  • Microfluidic devices
  • Lab-on-chip

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Sequence-Independent DNA Adsorption on Few-Layered Oxygen-Functionalized Graphene Electrodes: An Electrochemical Study for Biosensing Application
Biosensors 2021, 11(8), 273; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios11080273 - 14 Aug 2021
Viewed by 598
Abstract
DNA is strongly adsorbed on oxidized graphene surfaces in the presence of divalent cations. Here, we studied the effect of DNA adsorption on electrochemical charge transfer at few-layered, oxygen-functionalized graphene (GOx) electrodes. DNA adsorption on the inkjet-printed GOx electrodes caused [...] Read more.
DNA is strongly adsorbed on oxidized graphene surfaces in the presence of divalent cations. Here, we studied the effect of DNA adsorption on electrochemical charge transfer at few-layered, oxygen-functionalized graphene (GOx) electrodes. DNA adsorption on the inkjet-printed GOx electrodes caused amplified current response from ferro/ferricyanide redox probe at concentration range 1 aM–10 nM in differential pulse voltammetry. We studied a number of variables that may affect the current response of the interface: sequence type, conformation, concentration, length, and ionic strength. Later, we showed a proof-of-concept DNA biosensing application, which is free from chemical immobilization of the probe and sensitive at attomolar concentration regime. We propose that GOx electrodes promise a low-cost solution to fabricate a highly sensitive platform for label-free and chemisorption-free DNA biosensing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microfluidic Bio-Sensors and Their Applications)
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Article
Rapid Multianalyte Microfluidic Homogeneous Immunoassay on Electrokinetically Driven Beads
Biosensors 2020, 10(12), 212; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios10120212 - 21 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1251
Abstract
The simplicity of homogeneous immunoassays makes them suitable for diagnostics of acute conditions. Indeed, the absence of washing steps reduces the binding reaction duration and favors a rapid and compact device, a critical asset for patients experiencing life-threatening diseases. In order to maximize [...] Read more.
The simplicity of homogeneous immunoassays makes them suitable for diagnostics of acute conditions. Indeed, the absence of washing steps reduces the binding reaction duration and favors a rapid and compact device, a critical asset for patients experiencing life-threatening diseases. In order to maximize analytical performance, standard systems employed in clinical laboratories rely largely on the use of high surface-to-volume ratio suspended moieties, such as microbeads, which provide at the same time a fast and efficient collection of analytes from the sample and controlled aggregation of collected material for improved readout. Here, we introduce an integrated microfluidic system that can perform analyte detection on antibody-decorated beads and their accumulation in confined regions within 15 min. We employed the system to the concomitant analysis of clinical concentrations of Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin (NGAL) and Cystatin C in serum, two acute kidney injury (AKI) biomarkers. To this end, high-aspect-ratio, three-dimensional electrodes were integrated within a microfluidic channel to impart a controlled trajectory to antibody-decorated microbeads through the application of dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces. Beads were efficiently retained against the fluid flow of reagents, granting an efficient on-chip analyte-to-bead binding. Electrokinetic forces specific to the beads’ size were generated in the same channel, leading differently decorated beads to different readout regions of the chip. Therefore, this microfluidic multianalyte immunoassay was demonstrated as a powerful tool for the rapid detection of acute life-threatening conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microfluidic Bio-Sensors and Their Applications)
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Article
Development of a Pharmacogenetic Lab-on-Chip Assay Based on the In-Check Technology to Screen for Genetic Variations Associated to Adverse Drug Reactions to Common Chemotherapeutic Agents
Biosensors 2020, 10(12), 202; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios10120202 - 09 Dec 2020
Viewed by 934
Abstract
Background: Antineoplastic agents represent the most common class of drugs causing Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs). Mutant alleles of genes coding for drug-metabolizing enzymes are the best studied individual risk factors for these ADRs. Although the correlation between genetic polymorphisms and ADRs is well-known, [...] Read more.
Background: Antineoplastic agents represent the most common class of drugs causing Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs). Mutant alleles of genes coding for drug-metabolizing enzymes are the best studied individual risk factors for these ADRs. Although the correlation between genetic polymorphisms and ADRs is well-known, pharmacogenetic tests are limited to centralized laboratories with expensive or dedicated instrumentation used by specialized personnel. Nowadays, DNA chips have overcome the major limitations in terms of sensibility, specificity or small molecular detection, allowing the simultaneous detection of several genetic polymorphisms with time and costs-effective advantages. In this work, we describe the design of a novel silicon-based lab-on-chip assay able to perform low-density and high-resolution multi-assay analysis (amplification and hybridization reactions) on the In-Check platform. Methods: The novel lab-on-chip was used to screen 17 allelic variants of three genes associated with adverse reactions to common chemotherapeutic agents: DPYD (Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase), MTHFR (5,10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) and TPMT (Thiopurine S-methyltransferase). Results: Inter- and intra assay variability were performed to assess the specificity and sensibility of the chip. Linear regression was used to assess the optimal hybridization temperature set at 52 °C (R2 ≈ 0.97). Limit of detection was 50 nM. Conclusions: The high performance in terms of sensibility and specificity of this lab-on-chip supports its further translation to clinical diagnostics, where it may effectively promote precision medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microfluidic Bio-Sensors and Their Applications)
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Article
Gas Crosstalk between PFPE–PEG–PFPE Triblock Copolymer Surfactant-Based Microdroplets and Monitoring Bacterial Gas Metabolism with Droplet-Based Microfluidics
Biosensors 2020, 10(11), 172; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios10110172 - 11 Nov 2020
Viewed by 1199
Abstract
The PFPE–PEG–PFPE (Perfluoropolyether-polyethylene glycol-perfluoropolyether) surfactant has been used in droplet-based microfluidics and is known to provide high droplet stability and biocompatibility. Since this surfactant ensures the stability of droplets, droplet-based microfluidic systems have been widely used to encapsulate and analyze various biological components [...] Read more.
The PFPE–PEG–PFPE (Perfluoropolyether-polyethylene glycol-perfluoropolyether) surfactant has been used in droplet-based microfluidics and is known to provide high droplet stability and biocompatibility. Since this surfactant ensures the stability of droplets, droplet-based microfluidic systems have been widely used to encapsulate and analyze various biological components at the single-molecule scale, including viruses, bacteria, nucleic acids and proteins. In this study, we experimentally confirmed that gas crosstalk occurred between droplets formed by fluorinated oil and the PFPE–PEG–PFPE surfactant. E. coli K-12 bacterial cells were encapsulated with Luria–Bertani broth within droplets for the cultivation, and gas crosstalk was identified with neighboring droplets that contain phenol red. Since bacteria produce ammonia gas during its metabolism, penetration of ammonia gas initiates a color change of phenol red-containing droplets. Ammonia gas exchange was also confirmed by reacting ammonium chloride and sodium hydroxide within droplets that encapsulated. Herein, we demonstrate the gas crosstalk issue between droplets when it is formed using the PFPE–PEG–PFPE surfactant and also confirm that the density of droplet barrier has effects on gas crosstalk. Our results also suggest that droplet-based microfluidics can be used for the monitoring of living bacteria by the determination of bacterial metabolites during cultivation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microfluidic Bio-Sensors and Their Applications)
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Article
The Effect of Optically Induced Dielectrophoresis (ODEP)-Based Cell Manipulation in a Microfluidic System on the Properties of Biological Cells
Biosensors 2020, 10(6), 65; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios10060065 - 16 Jun 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1880
Abstract
Cell manipulation using optically induced dielectrophoresis (ODEP) in microfluidic systems has attracted the interest of scientists due to its simplicity. Although this technique has been successfully demonstrated for various applications, one fundamental issue has to be addressed—Whether, the ODEP field affects the native [...] Read more.
Cell manipulation using optically induced dielectrophoresis (ODEP) in microfluidic systems has attracted the interest of scientists due to its simplicity. Although this technique has been successfully demonstrated for various applications, one fundamental issue has to be addressed—Whether, the ODEP field affects the native properties of cells. To address this issue, we explored the effect of ODEP electrical conditions on cellular properties. Within the experimental conditions tested, the ODEP-based cell manipulation with the largest velocity occurred at 10 Vpp and 1 MHz, for the two cancer cell types explored. Under this operating condition, however, the cell viability of cancer cells was significantly affected (e.g., 70.5 ± 10.0% and 50.6 ± 9.2% reduction for the PC-3 and SK-BR-3 cancer cells, respectively). Conversely, the exposure of cancer cells to the ODEP electrical conditions of 7–10 Vpp and 3–5 MHz did not significantly alter the cell viability, cell metabolic activity, and the EpCAM, VIM, and ABCC1 gene expression of cancer cells. Overall, this study fundamentally investigated the effect of ODEP electrical conditions on the cellular properties of cancer cells. The information obtained is crucially important for the utilization of ODEP-based cell manipulation in a microscale system for various applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microfluidic Bio-Sensors and Their Applications)
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