Special Issue "Bioprocess Monitoring, Measurement, and Control by Biosensor-Based Technologies"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensor and Bioelectronic Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Yinlan Ruan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Physical Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia
Interests: online monitoring of bioprocesses including fermentation, cell culture, and biofuel production using optical spectral analysis technologies; micro- and nano-structured fibers based on silica and soft glasses; fast detection of raw materials and agriculture food; fiber-based surface plasmon resonance protein sensors; petrol/oil sensing; gas sensing; detection of environmental pollutants and food safety; fiber-based single-photon sources; fiber magnetometry based on nitrogen-vacancy centers; fiber/cavity-based biosensing; surface-enhanced Raman scattering and field enhanced fluorescence
Dr. Robert Horvath
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Nanobiosensorics Laboratory, Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1120 Budapest, Hungary
Interests: label-free biosensors; optics; waveguides; cell-based sensors; tissue on a chip; cell adhesion; protein adsorption; single cell; sensor coatings; kinetics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Online analysis of bioprocesses is of increasing interest because it helps to reduce the time delay for offline sample preparation and following analyses via conventional methods. Continuous monitoring of reaction components is a prerequisite for the direct control of biotransformations. An ideal analytical system should ensure that each individual process can be monitored separately without interfering with the process itself and with minimized risk of contamination. Well established liquid chromatography and mass spectrometer are being used to for online analysis. The optical spectral analysis technologies are very attractive to perform this task because of the advantages of being non-invasive, non-destructive, and capable of taking measurements both offline and inline, and enabling quantitative analysis of multiple components in real-time. This Special Issue encompasses a broad range of optical spectral sensors including UV/NIR/MIR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, optical waveguide sensing and surface plasmon resonance, and their at-line and online applications. Novel optics or fiber/waveguide probes with improved collection efficiency are welcome. Further topics that will be covered include any novel methods suitable for online bioprocess analysis with minimum interference. The application scenarios include but are not limited to the production of pharmaceuticals, chemicals, fuels, and food.

Dr. Yinlan Ruan
Dr. Robert Horvath
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • online monitoring
  • bioprocessing
  • ultraviolet spectroscopy
  • near-infrared spectroscopy
  • Mid-IR infrared spectroscopy
  • raman spectroscopy
  • surface plasmon resonance
  • optical waveguide resonances
  • data analysis
  • chemometrics
  • machine learning

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Fibre-Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor for Monoclonal Antibody Titer Quantification
Biosensors 2021, 11(10), 383; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios11100383 - 10 Oct 2021
Viewed by 352
Abstract
An extraordinary optical transmission fibre-optic surface plasmon resonance biosensing platform was engineered to improve its portability and sensitivity, and was applied to monitor the concentrations of monoclonal antibodies (Mabs). By refining the fabricating procedure and changing the material of the flow cell and [...] Read more.
An extraordinary optical transmission fibre-optic surface plasmon resonance biosensing platform was engineered to improve its portability and sensitivity, and was applied to monitor the concentrations of monoclonal antibodies (Mabs). By refining the fabricating procedure and changing the material of the flow cell and the components of the optical fibre, the biosensor is portable and robust to external interference. After the implementation of an effective template cleaning procedure and precise control during the fabrication process, a consistent sensitivity of 509 ± 5 nm per refractive index unit (nm/RIU) was achieved. The biosensor can detect the Mab with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.44 µg/mL. The results show that the biosensor is a potential tool for the rapid quantification of Mab titers. The biosensor can be regenerated at least 10 times with 10 mM glycine (pH = 2.5), and consistent signal changes were obtained after regeneration. Moreover, the employment of a spacer arm SM(PEG)2, used for immobilising protein A onto the gold film, was demonstrated to be unable to improve the detecting sensitivity; thus, a simple procedure without the spacer arm could be used to prepare the protein A-based biosensor. Our results demonstrate that the fibre-optic surface plasmon resonance biosensor is competent for the real-time and on-line monitoring of antibody titers in the future as a process analytical technologies (PATs) tool for bioprocess developments and the manufacture of therapeutic antibodies. Full article
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Article
Dissociation Constant of Integrin-RGD Binding in Live Cells from Automated Micropipette and Label-Free Optical Data
Biosensors 2021, 11(2), 32; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios11020032 - 24 Jan 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1040
Abstract
The binding of integrin proteins to peptide sequences such as arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) is a crucial step in the adhesion process of mammalian cells. While these bonds can be examined between purified proteins and their ligands, live-cell assays are better suited to gain [...] Read more.
The binding of integrin proteins to peptide sequences such as arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) is a crucial step in the adhesion process of mammalian cells. While these bonds can be examined between purified proteins and their ligands, live-cell assays are better suited to gain biologically relevant information. Here we apply a computer-controlled micropipette (CCMP) to measure the dissociation constant (Kd) of integrin-RGD-binding. Surface coatings with varying RGD densities were prepared, and the detachment of single cells from these surfaces was measured by applying a local flow inducing hydrodynamic lifting force on the targeted cells in discrete steps. The average behavior of the populations was then fit according to the chemical law of mass action. To verify the resulting value of Kd2d = (4503 ± 1673) 1/µm2, a resonant waveguide grating based biosensor was used, characterizing and fitting the adhesion kinetics of the cell populations. Both methods yielded a Kd within the same range. Furthermore, an analysis of subpopulations was presented, confirming the ability of CCMP to characterize cell adhesion both on single cell and whole population levels. The introduced methodologies offer convenient and automated routes to quantify the adhesivity of living cells before their further processing. Full article
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Article
A Self-Referenced Diffraction-Based Optical Leaky Waveguide Biosensor Using Photofunctionalised Hydrogels
Biosensors 2020, 10(10), 134; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios10100134 - 24 Sep 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1186
Abstract
We report a novel self-referenced diffraction-based leaky waveguide (LW) comprising a thin (~2 µm) film of a photofunctionalisable hydrogel created by covalent attachment of a biotinylated photocleavable linker to chitosan. Streptavidin attached to the chitosan via the photocleavable linker was selectively removed by [...] Read more.
We report a novel self-referenced diffraction-based leaky waveguide (LW) comprising a thin (~2 µm) film of a photofunctionalisable hydrogel created by covalent attachment of a biotinylated photocleavable linker to chitosan. Streptavidin attached to the chitosan via the photocleavable linker was selectively removed by shining 365 nm light through a photomask to create an array of strips with high and low loading of the protein, which served as sensor and reference regions respectively. The differential measurements between sensor and reference regions were used for measuring analytes (i.e., biotin protein A and IgG) while reducing environmental and non-specific effects. These include changes in temperature and sample composition caused by non-adsorbing and adsorbing species, leading to reduction in effects by ~98%, ~99%, and ~97% respectively compared to the absolute measurements. The novelty of this work lies in combining photofunctionalisable hydrogels with diffraction-based LWs for referencing. This is needed to realise the full potential of label-free optical biosensors to measure analyte concentrations in real samples that are complex mixtures, and to allow for sample analysis outside of laboratories where drifts and fluctuations in temperature are observed. Full article
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