Special Issue "Portable Technologies toward ASSURED Biosensing and Diagnostics"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensor and Bioelectronic Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Cuong Cao
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Advanced Micro- and Nanodiagnostics (AMINO), Institute for Global Food Security, School of Biological Sciences, QUB, 19 Chlorine Gardens, Belfast BT9 5DL, UK
Interests: optical-active nanomaterials for biosensing; nanoplasmonics-based biosensing platforms; point-of-care diagnostics
Prof. Dr. Christopher Elliott, OBE
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Global Food Security, School of Biological Sciences, Queen’s University, Belfast BT9 5DL, UK
Interests: food safety; food fraud and food integrity
Prof. Dr. Moon Il Kim
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of BioNano Technology, Gachon University, 1342 Seongnamdae-ro, Sujeong-gu, Seongnam, Gyeonggi 13120, Korea
Interests: nanozyme engineering; biosensor and nano-biomedical engineering; nanoflower engineering, etc

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The last decade has witnessed significant progress on the development of sensing platforms to provide highly sensitive, minimally invasive, label-free, multiplexing and real-time detection capabilities. With the emergence of powerful digital infrastructures, wireless networks and mobile devices, medical diagnosis and clinical evaluation have been now shifting from in-lab to online paradigm. The use of a variety of handheld devices such as smartphones, tablet PCs, digital cameras, satellite navigation, etc., has opened new opportunities for the developments of interactive and remote detection, personalized medicine, online monitoring and surveillance. This special issue of Biosensors will be devoted to bringing together review and original research articles discussing about innovative research and development on analytical sensing platforms that exploit ubiquitous devices to advance capabilities such as portability and automation. In addition, the special issue is also devoted to realizing potential applicability of the new concept in the area of ASSURED biosensing and diagnostics as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) where the diagnosis system must be: Affordable, Specific, Sensitive, User-friendly, Rapid and robust, Equipment-free, and Delivered to the end-users. Our focus will be at the interface of molecular diagnostics, micro- and nanotechnologies, system integration, and internet of things (IoT) that facilitate improved performance of the smartphone-based analytical sensors. We cordially invite scientists working on different disciplines such as material science, nanotechnology, microengineering, analytical science, computer science, etc. to submit their work for the special issues. All type of application areas is welcome.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Materials and their transducing capabilities that enable portable biosensing technologies: Nanomaterials, Plasmonics, Nanocatalysis, Colorimetry, Densitometry, Scannometry, Electrochemistry, SERS, etc.
  • Molecular diagnostic approaches compatible with portable biosensing technologies: PCR, ELISA, Isothermal amplification of nucleic acids, Immunological assays, etc.
  • Data processing, system integration and development of devices for portable biosensing: Lab-on-a-chip, Microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (µPAD), Lateral flow device, App development, Internet-of-things, Data storage, Smart algorithm, etc.

Dr. Cuong Cao
Prof. Christopher Elliott, OBE
Prof. Dr. Moon Il Kim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
A Cationic Surfactant-Decorated Liquid Crystal-Based Aptasensor for Label-Free Detection of Malathion Pesticides in Environmental Samples
Biosensors 2021, 11(3), 92; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios11030092 - 23 Mar 2021
Viewed by 820
Abstract
We report a liquid crystal (LC)-based aptasensor for the detection of malathion using a cationic surfactant-decorated LC interface. In this method, LCs displayed dark optical images when in contact with aqueous cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) solution due to the formation of a self-assembled CTAB [...] Read more.
We report a liquid crystal (LC)-based aptasensor for the detection of malathion using a cationic surfactant-decorated LC interface. In this method, LCs displayed dark optical images when in contact with aqueous cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) solution due to the formation of a self-assembled CTAB monolayer at the aqueous/LC interface, which induced the homeotropic orientation of LCs. With the addition of malathion aptamer, the homeotropic orientation of LCs changed to a planar one due to the interactions between CTAB and the aptamer, resulting in a bright optical image. In the presence of malathion, the formation of aptamer-malathion complexes caused a conformational change of the aptamers, thereby weakening the interactions between CTAB and the aptamers. Therefore, CTAB is free to induce a homeotropic ordering of the LCs, which corresponds to a dark optical image. The developed sensor exhibited high specificity for malathion determination and a low detection limit of 0.465 nM was achieved. Moreover, the proposed biosensor was successfully applied to detect malathion in tap water, river water, and apple samples. The proposed LC-based aptasensor is a simple, rapid, and convenient platform for label-free monitoring of malathion in environmental samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Portable Technologies toward ASSURED Biosensing and Diagnostics)
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Communication
Urinalysis Using a Diaper-Based Testing Device
Biosensors 2020, 10(8), 94; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios10080094 - 10 Aug 2020
Viewed by 2033
Abstract
Urinary tract infections (UTI), one of the most common bacterial infections, annually affect 150 million people worldwide. Infants and the elderly are likely to have missed or delayed diagnosis of UTI due to difficulty clearly describing their symptoms. A rapid screening method for [...] Read more.
Urinary tract infections (UTI), one of the most common bacterial infections, annually affect 150 million people worldwide. Infants and the elderly are likely to have missed or delayed diagnosis of UTI due to difficulty clearly describing their symptoms. A rapid screening method for UTI is a critical and urgent need for these populations. The aim of our study is to develop a diaper-based testing device to assay urine biomarkers including pH, leukocyte, and nitrite level. This all-in-one device assists in urine collection and testing using a colorimetric approach to provide easily read visual results on the outside surface of a test strip-integrated diaper. In this study, we tested samples from 46 patients using testing strips and examined the results from 7 patients recruited to validate the strip-integrated diaper. In conclusion, this new diaper-based testing device is easy to use, rapid, and inexpensive, all of which imbue it with tremendous potential for development into a commercially viable UTI screening system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Portable Technologies toward ASSURED Biosensing and Diagnostics)
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Article
Instrumentation-Free Semiquantitative Immunoanalysis Using a Specially Patterned Lateral Flow Assay Device
Biosensors 2020, 10(8), 87; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios10080087 - 31 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1710
Abstract
In traditional colorimetric lateral flow immunoassay (LFI) using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as a probe, additional optical transducers are required to quantify the signal intensity of the test line because it presents as a single red-colored line. In order to eliminate external equipment, the [...] Read more.
In traditional colorimetric lateral flow immunoassay (LFI) using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as a probe, additional optical transducers are required to quantify the signal intensity of the test line because it presents as a single red-colored line. In order to eliminate external equipment, the LFI signal should be quantifiable by the naked eye without the involvement of optical instruments. Given this objective, the single line test zone of conventional LFI was converted to several spots that formed herringbone patterns. When the sandwich immunoassay was performed on a newly developed semi-quantitative (SQ)-LFI system using AuNPs as an optical probe, the spots were colorized and the number of colored spots increased proportionally with the analyte concentration. By counting the number of colored spots, the analyte concentration can be easily estimated with the naked eye. To demonstrate the applicability of the SQ-LFI system in practical immunoanalysis, microalbumin, which is a diagnostic marker for renal failure, was analyzed using microalbumin-spiked artificial urine samples. Using the SQ-LFI system, the calibration results for artificial urine-based microalbumin were studied, ranging from 0 to 500 μg/mL, covering the required clinical detection range, and the limit of detection (LOD) value was calculated to be 15.5 μg/mL. Thus, the SQ-LFI system provides an avenue for the realization of an efficient quantification diagnostic device in resource-limited conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Portable Technologies toward ASSURED Biosensing and Diagnostics)
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Article
Development of Novel Magneto-Biosensor for Sulfapyridine Detection
Biosensors 2020, 10(4), 43; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bios10040043 - 21 Apr 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2736
Abstract
In this work, we report the development of a highly sensitive biosensor for sulfapyridine detection based on an integrated bio micro-electromechanical system (Bio-MEMS) containing four gold working electrodes (WEs), a platinum counter electrode (CE), and a reference electrode (RE). Firstly, the cleaned WEs [...] Read more.
In this work, we report the development of a highly sensitive biosensor for sulfapyridine detection based on an integrated bio micro-electromechanical system (Bio-MEMS) containing four gold working electrodes (WEs), a platinum counter electrode (CE), and a reference electrode (RE). Firstly, the cleaned WEs were modified with 4-aminophenylacetic acid (CMA). Then, (5-[4-(amino)phenylsulfonamide]-5-oxopentanoic acid (SA2BSA) was immobilized onto the transducers surface by carbodiimide chemistry. The analyte was quantified by competitive detection with SA2BSA immobilized on the WE toward a mixture of Ab155 antibody (with fixed concentration) and sulfapyridine. In order to obtain a highly sensitive biosensor, Ab155 was immobilized onto magnetic latex nanoparticles surface to create a 3D architecture (Ab-MLNp). Using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), we investigated the influence of the Ab-MLNp on the sensitivity of our approach. The optimized system was analyzed, as competitive assay, with different concentrations of sulfapyridine (40 µM, 4 µM, and 2 nM) and with phosphate buffer solution. From data fitting calculations and graphs, it was observed that the EIS showed more linearity when Ab-MLNp was used. This result indicates that the magnetic latex nanoparticles increased the sensitivity of the biosensor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Portable Technologies toward ASSURED Biosensing and Diagnostics)
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