Special Issue "Profiles of Dysarthria: Clinical Assessment and Treatment"

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Neurolinguistics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Wolfram Ziegler
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Phonetics and Speech Processing, University of Munich, Munich 80539, Germany
Interests: neurophonetics; motor speech disorders; dysarthria; apraxia of speech; aphasia; childhood dysarthria; clinical assessment; phonological impairment
Dr. Anja Staiger
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Phonetics and Speech Processing, University of Munich, Munich 80539, Germany
Interests: neurophonetics; motor speech disorders; apraxia of speech; dysarthria; primary progressive aphasia; primary progressive apraxia of speech; clinical assessment
Dr. Theresa Schölderle
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Phonetics and Speech Processing, University of Munich, Munich 80539, Germany
Interests: neurophonetics; motor speech disorders; dysarthria; childhood dysarthria; cerebral palsy; clinical assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent decades have seen a wealth of theoretical and proof-of-principle works on dysarthria, including descriptions of dysarthric speech patterns and their classification, new assessment methods, and intervention trials.

This Special Issue looks at where we are today in terms of translating this knowledge into clinical practice. Since the 1930s, when the first oscillograms displaying “phonetic disintegration” symptoms were published, a vast number of papers presenting acoustic patterns of dysarthria appeared, but it is has not been sufficiently clear until today how their promise can be realized in daily clinical practice. Since the 1970s, increasingly sophisticated electronic devices have been introduced to study the speech movement characteristics of dysarthria, but the “physiologic approach” that has been promoted is still not firmly established in clinical care. Equally long ago, Darley’s group provided us with an inventory of auditory-perceptual descriptors of dysarthric speech, but little work has yet been done to compensate for the psychometric downsides of this approach and implement it as a reliable standard in clinical assessment.

This Issue aims to bring together the threads of these developments, with a perspective to discuss their potentials and their specific roles in the daily clinical work of speech-language pathologists or neurologists.

We invite original translational works as well as review papers on the following areas:

  • Auditory-perceptual, acoustic, or physiologic parameters in the assessment of dysarthria profiles and the measurement of severity, monitoring of change, or classification;
  • Implementation issues and the role of digital health technologies, including machine learning advancements;
  • Validity and standardization issues, with particular consideration of physiologic, communication, and participation aspects;
  • The role of cutting-edge technologies like virtual-reality-based interactive speech training systems.

Dr. Wolfram Ziegler
Dr. Anja Staiger
Dr. Theresa Schölderle
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dysarthria
  • assessment
  • therapy
  • methods
  • clinical
  • translational

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Utility of the Intelligibility in Context Scale for Predicting Speech Intelligibility of Children with Cerebral Palsy
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(11), 1540; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/brainsci11111540 - 20 Nov 2021
Viewed by 550
Abstract
The Intelligibility in Context Scale (ICS) is a widely used, efficient tool for describing a child’s speech intelligibility. Few studies have explored the relationship between ICS scores and transcription intelligibility scores, which are the gold standard for clinical measurement. This study examined how [...] Read more.
The Intelligibility in Context Scale (ICS) is a widely used, efficient tool for describing a child’s speech intelligibility. Few studies have explored the relationship between ICS scores and transcription intelligibility scores, which are the gold standard for clinical measurement. This study examined how well ICS composite scores predicted transcription intelligibility scores among children with cerebral palsy (CP), how well individual questions from the ICS differentially predicted transcription intelligibility scores, and how well the ICS composite scores differentiated between children with and without speech motor impairment. Parents of 48 children with CP, who were approximately 13 years of age, completed the ICS. Ninety-six adult naïve listeners provided orthographic transcriptions of children’s speech. Transcription intelligibility scores were regressed on ICS composite scores and individual item scores. Dysarthria status was regressed on ICS composite scores. Results indicated that ICS composite scores were moderately strong predictors of transcription intelligibility scores. One individual ICS item differentially predicted transcription intelligibility scores, and dysarthria severity influenced how well ICS composite scores differentiated between children with and without speech motor impairment. Findings suggest that the ICS has potential clinical utility for children with CP, especially when used with other objective measures of speech intelligibility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Profiles of Dysarthria: Clinical Assessment and Treatment)
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