Special Issue "Environmental Comfort in Hospitals"

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Energy, Physics, Environment, and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2022) | Viewed by 861

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Simone Secchi
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Guest Editor
Department of Architecture, University of Florence, 50121 Firenze, Italy
Interests: building acoustics; room acoustics; daylighting; architecture technologies
Prof. Dr. Nicoletta Setola
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Guest Editor
Department of Architecture, University of Florence, 50121 Firenze, Italy
Interests: hospital design; healthy spaces; layout configuration analysis
Prof. Dr. Luca Marzi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Architecture, University of Florence, 50121 Firenze, Italy
Interests: healthy spaces; tools and methods for hospital management; accessibility and design for all

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hospitals include a variety of different spaces with different sensitivity and environmental requirements both for patients and for personnel. Thermal, lighting, and acoustic comfort is very important for patients as well as visual comfort and humanized environment: they can facilitate or make patients’ rehabilitation more complex. Hospital staff, who often spend many hours continuously in closed hospital environments, is usually very sensitive to environmental conditions.

The layout configuration inside a hospital must be planned with regard to the potential conflict between different requirements. Indeed, environmental requirements can be very different in indoor spaces close to each other. The need for doctors and nurses to monitor patients’ health often conflicts with patients’ need for rest. The use of medical equipment often requires conditions that cannot be waived but which are not comfortable for the patients. For example, concerning acoustic comfort, in hospitals, there are different activities and equipment that can cause high noise levels.

Aspects relating to the relationship between space design and work activities also contribute to increasing the level of environmental comfort. In this context, ergonomics and environmental control and management methods can be examined in relation to both the design and the space management phases.

Despite the number of regulations that refer to hospitals, environmental comfort for patients and medical staff is not an easy task.

The need to create healthy spaces suitable for various types of use entails difficulties in identifying where and how to apply the limits set by the legislation while there are situations in which, regardless of the legislation, it would be opportune to consider a more adequate environmental control.

Sensory environments, where light and sound can be controlled, help to reduce stress in patients and staff.

In this Special Issue, articles are expected on environmental design, sensory environment, layout configuration, management parameters and methods, aspects related to human factors and legislation, and the results of physical parameter measurements in hospitals.

Prof. Dr. Simone Secchi
Prof. Dr. Nicoletta Setola
Prof. Dr. Luca Marzi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hospitals
  • environmental comfort
  • acoustic quality
  • lighting
  • thermal comfort
  • digital space control
  • digital healthcare systems (DHS)
  • human factors
  • ergonomics
  • path

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Facilitating Patient-Centric Thinking in Hospital Facility Management: A Case of Pharmaceutical Inventory
Buildings 2022, 12(7), 888; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/buildings12070888 - 23 Jun 2022
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Abstract
Conventional hospital facility management (FM) focuses on reasonably allocating various resources to support core healthcare services from the perspectives of the FM department and hospital. However, since patients are the main service targets of hospitals, the patients’ demographic and hospitalization information can be [...] Read more.
Conventional hospital facility management (FM) focuses on reasonably allocating various resources to support core healthcare services from the perspectives of the FM department and hospital. However, since patients are the main service targets of hospitals, the patients’ demographic and hospitalization information can be integrated to support the patient-centric facility management, aiming at a higher level of patient satisfaction with respect to the hospital environment and services. Taking the pharmaceutical services in hospital inpatient departments as the case, forecasting the pharmaceutical demands based on the admitted patients’ information contributes to not only better logistics management and cost containment, but also to securing the medical requirements of individual patients. In patient-centric facility management, the pharmacy inventory is regarded as the combination of medical resources that are reserved and allocated to each admitted patient. Two forecasting models are trained to predict the inpatients’ total medical requirement at the beginning of the hospitalization and rectify the patients’ length of stay after early treatment. Specifically, once a patient is admitted to the hospital, certain amounts of medical resources are reserved, according to the inpatient’s gender, age, diagnosis, and their preliminary expected days in the hospital. The allocated inventory is updated after the early treatment by rectifying the inpatient’s estimated length of stay. The proposed procedure is validated using medical data from eighteen hospitals in a Chinese city. This study facilitates the integration of patient-related information with the conventional FM processes and demonstrates the potential improvement in patients’ satisfaction with better hospital logistics and pharmaceutical services. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Comfort in Hospitals)
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