Special Issue "Environmental Carcinogenesis"

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694). This special issue belongs to the section "Cancer Pathophysiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sonika Patial
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
Interests: environmental carcinogenesis; RNA binding proteins; inflammation; macrophages; immunopathology; alcohol-induced liver injury; toxicogenomics
Prof. Dr. Sonja M. Kessler
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Experimental Pharmacology for Natural Sciences, Institute of Pharmacy, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, 06120 Halle, Germany
Interests: non-alcoholic steatohepatitis; gastrointestinal cancers; RNA-binding proteins

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Environmental and occupational exposures to a wide range of physical, chemical, or biological agents have been associated with an increased risk of cancer. Exposure to these agents can occur through the air that we breathe, the water that we drink, the food that we eat, or our lifestyle choices. Common examples from the environment include ultraviolet radiation, aflatoxins, arsenic, and radon. Similarly, several industrial chemicals such as asbestos, wood dust, coal tar products, vinyl chloride, formaldehyde, benzene, and cadmium are potential carcinogens. Based on scientific evidence, a list of potential such human carcinogens have been developed by the National Toxicology Program (NTP) and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). These agents possess the ability to interact with our genome in multiple ways and can affect cancer initiation, progression, and aggression. For instance, these agents can induce genetic and epigenetic alternations in host tissues, resulting in aberrant expression and function of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. These cellular and molecular events can cause alteration of cellular functions, including cellular proliferation, stress responses, and DNA repair mechanisms, thus promoting tumorigenesis.

This Special Issue invites review and original research articles on environmental carcinogenesis particularly focused on the mechanisms of interaction of environmental carcinogens with the host genome, novel biomarkers to assess these exposures, methods for prevention and early detection, cancer disparities, and determining how cumulative exposures to environmental carcinogens during one’s lifetime can affect cancer risk.

Dr. Sonika Patial
Prof. Dr. Sonja M. Kessler
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • environmental carcinogen
  • occupational chemicals, air pollution
  • radiation
  • cancer pathogenesis
  • carcinogenic risk
  • polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon
  • radon, arsenic
  • asbestos
  • vinyl chloride
  • metals

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Article
Rare Occurrence of Aristolochic Acid Mutational Signatures in Oro-Gastrointestinal Tract Cancers
Cancers 2022, 14(3), 576; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/cancers14030576 (registering DOI) - 24 Jan 2022
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Abstract
Background: Aristolochic acids (AAs) are potent mutagens commonly found in herbal plant-based remedies widely used throughout Asian countries. Patients and Methods: To understand whether AA is involved in the tumorigenesis of the oro-gastrointestinal tract, we used whole-exome sequencing to profile 54 cases of [...] Read more.
Background: Aristolochic acids (AAs) are potent mutagens commonly found in herbal plant-based remedies widely used throughout Asian countries. Patients and Methods: To understand whether AA is involved in the tumorigenesis of the oro-gastrointestinal tract, we used whole-exome sequencing to profile 54 cases of four distinct types of oro-gastrointestinal tract cancer (OGITC) from Taiwan. Results: A diverse landscape of mutational signatures including those from DNA mismatch repair and reactive oxygen species was observed. APOBEC mutational signatures were observed in 60% of oral squamous cell carcinomas. Only one sample harbored AA mutational signatures, contradictory to prior reports of cancers from Taiwan. The metabolism of AA in the liver and urinary tract, transient exposure time, and high cell turnover rates at OGITC sites may explain our findings. Conclusion: AA signatures in OGITCs are rare and unlikely to be a major contributing factor in oro-gastrointestinal tract tumorigenesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Carcinogenesis)
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Systematic Review
Oral Microbiota—A New Frontier in the Pathogenesis and Management of Head and Neck Cancers
Cancers 2022, 14(1), 46; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/cancers14010046 - 23 Dec 2021
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Abstract
Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) comprises the majority of tumors in head and neck tissues. The prognosis of HNSCC has not significantly improved for decades, signifying the need for new diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Recent evidence suggests that oral microbiota is [...] Read more.
Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) comprises the majority of tumors in head and neck tissues. The prognosis of HNSCC has not significantly improved for decades, signifying the need for new diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Recent evidence suggests that oral microbiota is associated with carcinogenesis. Thus, we conducted a comprehensive systematic review to evaluate the current evidence regarding the role of oral microbiota in HNSCC and whether their targeting may confer diagnostic, prognostic or therapeutic utility. Following the screening of 233 publications retrieved from multiple databases, 34 eligible studies comprising 2469 patients were compiled and critically appraised. Importantly, many oral pathogens, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were linked to certain oral potentially malignant lesions and various types of HNSCC. Furthermore, we summarized the association between the expression profiles of different oral bacterial species and their tumorigenic and prognostic effects in cancer patients. We also discussed the current limitations of this newly emerging area and the potential microbiota-related strategies for preventing and treating HNSCC. Whilst many clinical studies are underway to unravel the role of oral microbiota in cancer, the limited available data and experimental approaches reflect the newness of this promising yet challenging field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Carcinogenesis)
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