Special Issue "Functional Carbons and Carbides: Bioapplications and Beyond"

A special issue of C (ISSN 2311-5629). This special issue belongs to the section "Carbon Materials and Carbon Allotropes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Noelia Rubio Carrero
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, UK
Interests: organic chemistry; nano materials; composites; drug delivery; graphene

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of C-Journal of Carbon Research aims to bring together original research articles focusing on the biomedical applications of functionalized carbon-related materials and carbides. The morphology and functionalities of carbon-related materials dictate their final biomedical application. Thus, understanding the properties of the different allotropic phases (carbon nanotubes, graphene, amorphous carbon, quantum dots, etc.) will enable the use of each material in the most appropriate biomedical application including drug delivery, tissue engineering, imaging, and biosensing, among others. Two-dimensional transition metal carbides and silicon carbides constitute a new family of carbon-related materials with fascinating physicochemical properties that can be tuned using surface modification techniques. New opportunities for using these new materials in biomedicine will also be explored in this Special Issue. We welcome submissions from all disciplines involved in these interesting topics.

Dr. Noelia Rubio Carrero
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. C is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • 2D materials
  • Carbon-related materials
  • Biomedical applications
  • Nanomaterials
  • Drug delivery systems
  • Imaging systems
  • Tissue engineering
  • Silicon carbide materials
  • Transition metal carbides

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Carbon-Based Nanomaterials for Delivery of Biologicals and Therapeutics: A Cutting-Edge Technology
C 2021, 7(1), 19; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/c7010019 - 05 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 576
Abstract
After hydrogen and oxygen, carbon is the third most abundant component present in the cosmos with excellent characteristic features of binding to itself and nearly all elements. Since ancient times, carbon-based materials such as graphite, charcoal, and carbon black have been utilized for [...] Read more.
After hydrogen and oxygen, carbon is the third most abundant component present in the cosmos with excellent characteristic features of binding to itself and nearly all elements. Since ancient times, carbon-based materials such as graphite, charcoal, and carbon black have been utilized for writing and drawing materials. As these materials possess excellent chemical, mechanical, electrical, and thermal features, they have been readily engineered into carbon-based nanomaterials (CNMs) such as carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, graphene quantum dots, nanodiamonds, fullerenes, carbon nano-onions, and so forth. These materials are now widely explored in biomedical applications. Thus, the emergence of CNMs has opened up a gateway for the detection, delivery, and treatment of a multitude of diseases. They are being actively researched for applications within tissue engineering, as vaccine vectors, and for the delivery of therapeutics to the immune system. This review focuses on the recent advances in various types of CNMs, their fabrication techniques, and their application in the delivery of therapeutics both in vitro and in vivo. The review also focuses on the toxicity concern of the CNMs and the possible remedies to tackle the toxicity issues. Concluding remarks emphasize all the CNMs discussed in the review over their possible biomedical applications, while the future perspectives section discusses the approaches to bring CNMs into the mainstream of clinical trials and their therapeutic applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Carbons and Carbides: Bioapplications and Beyond)
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Open AccessReview
Carbon Nanohorns as Effective Nanotherapeutics in Cancer Therapy Viewed by 693
Abstract
Different carbon nanostructures have been explored as functional materials for the development of effective nanomaterials in cancer treatment applications. This review mainly aims to discuss the features, either strength or weakness, of carbon nanohorn (CNH), carbon conical horn-shaped nanostructures of sp2 carbon atoms. [...] Read more.
Different carbon nanostructures have been explored as functional materials for the development of effective nanomaterials in cancer treatment applications. This review mainly aims to discuss the features, either strength or weakness, of carbon nanohorn (CNH), carbon conical horn-shaped nanostructures of sp2 carbon atoms. The interest for these materials arises from their ability to couple the clinically relevant properties of carbon nanomaterials as drug carriers with the negligible toxicity described in vivo. Here, we offer a comprehensive overview of the recent advances in the use of CNH in cancer treatments, underlining the benefits of each functionalization route and approach, as well as the biological performances of either loaded and unloaded materials, while discussing the importance of delivery devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Carbons and Carbides: Bioapplications and Beyond)
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