Special Issue "Nanocarbon-Based Composites and Their Thermal, Electrical, and Mechanical Properties"

A special issue of C (ISSN 2311-5629). This special issue belongs to the section "Carbon Materials and Carbon Allotropes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Gil Goncalves
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Universidade de Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: graphene-based porous structures for heterogeneous catalysis (catalysis) and water purification (environmental applications); three-dimensional graphene foam as a biocompatible and conductive scaffold for biomedical applications (biomaterials); SERS active nanostructured substrates based on graphene for selective biomolecules detection (sensors); graphene oxide nanoplatforms development for detection and therapy of cancer cells and tumors (therapeutic agent)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is committed to exploring novel nanocomposite materials reinforced with carbon nanostructures for improved mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties. This Issue will cover the development of metallic, ceramic, and polymeric multifunctional nanocomposites through the incorporation of graphene-based materials, carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, nanodiamonds, and nanohorns.

Carbon nanomaterials with different dimensions are characterized by excellent mechanical resistance, electrical and thermal conductivity, and high versatility for chemical surface functionalization. This is a critical feature for modulating their interfaces at the atomic level for improved dispersibility and compatibility with several matrices. Within this context, this Issue will be dedicated to manufacturing processes, simulation prediction and analysis, and structural characterization of the carbon-based nanocomposite.

The manuscripts should explore the outstanding mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties that arise from the synergistic effect between carbon nanostructures and diverse matrices, with strong scientific and technological relevance in the energy, biomedical, environment, sensors, and structural materials fields.

Dr. Gil Goncalves
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. C is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Graphene
  • Carbon dots
  • Carbon nanotubes
  • Nanodiamonds
  • Carbon nanohorns
  • Graphene-based materials
  • Polymeric nanocomposites
  • Metallic nanocomposites
  • Ceramic nanocomposites
  • Biomaterials
  • Energy
  • Environment
  • Mechanical properties
  • Electrical properties
  • Thermal properties
  • Structural characterization

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Energy Absorption in Carbon Fiber Composites with Holes under Quasi-Static Loading
C 2021, 7(1), 16; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/c7010016 - 01 Feb 2021
Viewed by 367
Abstract
Composite tubular structures have shown promise as energy absorbers in the automobile industry. This paper investigates the energy absorption characteristics of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) tubes with pre-existing holes. Holes may represent an extreme case of impact damage that perforates the tube, [...] Read more.
Composite tubular structures have shown promise as energy absorbers in the automobile industry. This paper investigates the energy absorption characteristics of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) tubes with pre-existing holes. Holes may represent an extreme case of impact damage that perforates the tube, e.g., stones from road surface impacting the tubes. Tubes with holes represent more conservative performance characteristics, since impact damage of the same size will have residual material, which may carry some load. Tubes with holes can provide the lower limit of CFRP tube performance under axial crushing relative to impact damaged tubes with perforation diameter close to the hole diameter. In this study, tubes with lay-up of [05/902/04] with one and two holes in defined locations and different diameters are experimentally studied under quasi-static loading. It was found that specific energy absorption (SEA) reduces by 50% with one or two holes of 15 mm size, 100 mm from top of the tube. The SEA reduction is about 60% lower than the regular tube when the diameter of the hole is 20 mm located at 100 mm from top. The most severe reduction occurs if the location of single or double holes are 75 mm from the top. In this case, a SEA reduction of 75% can be expected. Results indicate that holes can significantly alter the energy absorption capability of the tubes. It is also clear that in axial crushing of composite tubes, the location of the hole (100 to 75 mm) appears to create more pronounced effect than the size of the hole itself (15 vs. 20 mm) for the cases investigated. The failure modes for tubes with holes seem to preserve similar damage modes with delamination, frond creation, and brittle fracture, which is typically observed in regular composite tubes under axial crushing load. This is due to primarily front end crushing, which dominates the failure modes, while hole induced damage occurs later. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of the Stacking Faults on the Electrical Resistance of Highly Ordered Graphite Bulk Samples
C 2020, 6(3), 49; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/c6030049 - 25 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 797
Abstract
High anisotropy and the existence of two-dimensional highly conducting interfaces at stacking faults parallel to the graphene planes of the graphite structure influence, in a non-simple way, the transport properties of highly oriented graphite. We report two related effects on the electrical resistance [...] Read more.
High anisotropy and the existence of two-dimensional highly conducting interfaces at stacking faults parallel to the graphene planes of the graphite structure influence, in a non-simple way, the transport properties of highly oriented graphite. We report two related effects on the electrical resistance of highly oriented pyrolytic as well as of natural graphite bulk samples, measured with the four points method in the temperature range 300 K T 410 K. A qualitative and quantitative change in the temperature dependence of the resistance was obtained by simply enlarging the electrodes and contacting the edges of the internal interfaces on the same sample. Additionally, at temperatures T350 K the resistance can change with time. We show that this temperature-dependent annealing effect is related to the stacking faults and can irreversibly change the absolute value of the resistance and its temperature dependence. A partial recovery is obtained after leaving the sample at normal conditions for several days. The overall results stress the importance of the electrodes location on a bulk graphite sample, the contribution of the stacking faults in the interpretation of the measured transport properties and the need of systematic studies on the influence of high temperature annealing on the interfaces properties. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Expendable Graphite as an Efficient Flame-Retardant for Novel Partial Bio-Based Rigid Polyurethane Foams
C 2020, 6(2), 27; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/c6020027 - 01 May 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 894
Abstract
The rigid polyurethane foam (PU) is a versatile material, used especially for construction and household applications. The current situation demands a facile, cost-efficient, and greener approach for developing the polyurethanes from bio-derived materials. In this study, we present a novel bio-polyol synthesized using [...] Read more.
The rigid polyurethane foam (PU) is a versatile material, used especially for construction and household applications. The current situation demands a facile, cost-efficient, and greener approach for developing the polyurethanes from bio-derived materials. In this study, we present a novel bio-polyol synthesized using carvone, an extract from caraway, spearmint, or dill seeds via facile thiol-ene reaction. Our one-step reaction uses a UV irradiation to allow the room temperature conversion of the carvone to a high purity bio-polyol, as confirmed from the standard analytical characterizations. The hydroxyl number of 365 mg KOH/g close to its theoretical limit confirms the high conversion yield of the polyol for rigid PU synthesis. To overcome the flammability issues in PU, expandable graphite (EG) powder was used as an additive flame-retardant during the synthesis step. The resulting foams with EG maintained the uniform closed cell structure (>95%) with a high compression strength of 175 kPa. The addition of EG in PU results in the formation of a protective char layer during the flammability test and reduces the weight loss from 40.70% to 3.55% and burning time from 87 to 11 s. Our results confirm that the carvone-based polyol can be a novel alternative to the petroleum polyols for an industrial-scale application. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Power Cycling and Reliability Testing of Epoxy-Based Graphene Thermal Interface Materials
C 2020, 6(2), 26; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/c6020026 - 25 Apr 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1147
Abstract
We report on the lifespan evolution of thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity in curing epoxy-based thermal interface materials with graphene fillers. The performance and reliability of graphene composites have been investigated in up to 500 power cycling measurements. The tested composites were prepared [...] Read more.
We report on the lifespan evolution of thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity in curing epoxy-based thermal interface materials with graphene fillers. The performance and reliability of graphene composites have been investigated in up to 500 power cycling measurements. The tested composites were prepared with an epoxy resin base and randomly oriented fillers consisting of a mixture of few-layer and single-layer graphene. The power cycling treatment procedure was conducted with a custom-built setup, while the thermal characteristics were determined using the “laser flash” method. The thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of these composites do not degrade but instead improve with power cycling. Among all tested filled samples with different graphene loading fractions, an enhancement in the thermal conductivity values of 15% to 25% has been observed. The obtained results suggest that epoxy-based thermal interface materials with graphene fillers undergo an interesting and little-studied intrinsic performance enhancement, which can have important implications for the development of next-generation thermal interface materials. Full article
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